Sunday, June 18, 2017

From: Tom Maiorano
E-Mail: tmaiorano1@verizon.net
Shop: 38 Shop

HAPPY FATHER'S DAY TO ALL.

Wednesday, May 17, 2017

On May 16, 2017 at 11:25 PM Dennis Kaiser Sr <Dennis_Kaiser@outlook.com> wrote:

Here is a link that will let you enjoy Giff’s appearance on QVC tonight.  It will be up for 1 week.  If you want to keep it then download the video to your PC. : Mike Gifford on QVC

Tuesday, May 16, 2017

From: Dennis Kaiser
E-Mail: dennis_kaiser@outlook.com
Shop: Code 911

Vince Agostino Former PNSY Rigger General Forman, passed away Saturday morning, May 13th 2017 after fighting pancreatic cancer, arrangements are below:
Our Lady of Peace Parish
32 Carroll Ave
Williamstown, NJ 08094
Viewing Friday May 19, 2017 at 11 AM, Mass at 12 PM
Church phone # 856-629-6142

Saturday, May 6, 2017

From: Brooks
E-Mail: sebrooks3@yahoo.com
Shop:

Laird 'Lad' Doctor was a Navy pilot during the Vietnam war. I believe he went through flight training around '67. I am hoping to visit with the five who trained with him on, I believe to be the T-2 Buckeye? And any pilot who worked with Lad during his Naval career.

Thank you

Wednesday, May 3, 2017

From: Wayne C. Johnson
E-Mail: friedajohnson8@gmail.com
Shop: 56

Hi, I have been on this site before and I think I asked the same question. My husband Wayne Johnson passed away on May 30, 2005. He worked as an insulator in Shop 56. I have been trying to find out if my husband had a pension plan at the old Philadelphia Naval Shipyard or not. Does anyone happen to know who I can contact. I was told to contact the OPM. They did not help me. I don't think it is fair for the state to keep his pension if he had one.

Thank you for any help you may know about.

Frieda Johnson
(Wayne's wife)

April 18, 2017

I'm looking for some help. There is a US Veterans Memorial , all privately funded of course in a little town in Ohio called Clinton, OHio. In this memorial are the names of all Ohio U.S. service men killed in Vietnam, Iraq war, Afganistan, Gulf War, etc… there are memeorial granite benches, bricks with supporters. There is an Army Patton tank that saw battle in Iraq, a U.S. Marine Apache Attack Helicopter, Army Trucks but nothing for my beloved U.S. Navy. What the facility is looking for is a U.S. Navy Ship Anchor. Would you know of anyone who could help us find one? One that someone would be willing to donate?
Thanks,
 
RM3 (SS) Keith W. Davis
USS Andrew Jackson
SSBN 619 Blue 1973- 1977
 

Tuesday, April 4, 2017

From: Bill Murray
E-Mail: ladybugjoan@comcast.net
Shop: QA, Planning & Design

Fantastic lawyer for Asbestos cases:

Mike Cancelliere and Casey Coburn at Nass, Cancelliere and Brenner.
They are located at 1515 Market Street Suite 200 Phila. Pa. 19102 215-546-8200. They are outstanding council and I highly suggest contacting them if you or anyone else has an issue.

Tuesday, April 4, 2017

From: Billy Reil
E-Mail: billyreil1999@gmail.com
Shop: 160

I had google searched my grandfathers name, and saw that guys/girls had been asking about him. It's my pleasure to let you know that he is alive and well at age 87. Bill stills lives in south philadelphia, enjoying his retirement. Please feel free to send me an email if you want to say hello.

Tuesday, March 28, 2017

From: G EVANS
E-Mail: GEVANS1054@VERIZON.NET
Shop: SHOP 26

Carrier Valley Forge built at PNSY with money from the citizens of Phila. and the surround area. Seventy six million in War Bonds (1 Billion today) About 8 million from School children (103 million today).
There was a large model of the ship on back of a trailer with a space around the hull. Sailors from the Navy Yard would bring the ship to parades and large social affairs. People would through money into the space around the ship to help pay for the building of the carrier.

Tuesday, March 28, 2017

From: G EVANS
E-Mail: GEVANS1054@VERIZON.NET
Shop: SHOP 26

During WW2 there were mock air raids drills around the city of Phila. A plane would fly over an area of the city and drop paper shaped like bombs. If you picked up a bombs, on the back list the type of injury you might have. You were to take the bomb to the nearest Hospital, Police Station, Rec Centers for treatment. Some of those were moved to Hospitals.
I once chased a bomb for 4 blocks before it went on a roof. I then went to the Police Station and watch the Medical Staff at work.

Wednesday, March 15, 2017

From: billy d
E-Mail: rigger072@yahoo.com
Shop: 072

Bill Adair X51 shop is still alive and kicking I see him often and yes he is still Rotten Ralph

Sunday, March 12, 2017

From: G EVANS
E-Mail: GEVANS1054@VERIZON.NET
Shop: SHOP 26

My father in law, Charlie, was gassed in France and again in Belgium during WW-1. He spent most of his early years in VA hospitals and clinics. WW-2 came and he volunteered as a Fire Watch at Cramp's (no pay). A few months in, the volunteers received pay. The shipyard was charging the Navy a full man days of work for these volunteers. Charlie had to quit Cramps, too much smoke. He then took up that Noble Profession, NUMBER WRITER.

Friday, March 10, 2017
 
From: Bob Daley
E-Mail: hogdale@hotmail.com
Shop: 51

What ever happened to Bill Adair AKA Rotten Ralph ? Foreman 51 Shop.

Sunday, March 5, 2017

From: Jerry Kane
E-Mail: Zuri29@Cox.net
Shop: 67, 273, 235, PERA

During WWI my grandfather, Tom Kane, worked at Cramp's as a shipfitter helper. When the war ended so did his job. Sometime in the mid 30's he got hired at PNSY as a shipfitter helper. In the late 30's, after graduating from high school, my uncle Jim Kane started as an apprentice shipfitter. When WWII started, Uncle Jim tried to enlist but failed the physical due to his eye sight. My grandfather helped build the New Jersey while Uncle Jim helped build the Wisconsin. Sometime in late 43, Uncle Jim finally passed the eye test and was able to join 3 of his brothers in the Navy. Once the war ended, my grandfather again lost his job, Uncle Jim was mustered out of the navy and rejoined PNSY. When Uncle Bob Kane got out of the navy he also started at PNSY, eventually joining the newly formed electronics shop.

Friday, March 3, 2017

From: Jim Walker
E-Mail: jw06693@gmail.com
Shop: Type Desk, 41

Prior to WW I , Cramp was the leading builder of iron hull ships in the world.When they built up for WW II, The shipyard lent them experienced workers to provide leadership McKenna a boiler forman when I was an apprentice was a quarterman at Cramp. My Father -in- law Fred Sheppard attended a school in an old hosery mill in Kensington and led a shipfitter gang that did the noses of the subs.

Wednesday, March 1, 2017

From: george kepner
E-Mail: gek1986@yahoo.com
Shop: 051-62435

yes keep posting about the history of the Delaware . I look everyday for your stories and others . will never forget the family we made there . thank for sharing dan

Tuesday, February 28, 2017

From: Danny O'Kane
E-Mail: dannyboydpo@rcn.com
Shop: 11 Shop

Here's a little more on the Shipbuilding on the Delaware from 1940 to 1947 . At New York Ship in Camden ,which employed 32,000 at it's peak,light cruisers were the specialty early on . Later,it was carriers. At Sun Ship in Chester, 34,000 workers turned out tankers and transport ships for the U.S.Maritime Commission. Cramps with 17,000 workers ,specialized in submarines ,turning out 22 of them .
The Dravo Corp. , at Wilmingtonyards,built destroyer-escorts and landing ships . John Trumpy , of Gloucester City, launched 30 PT boats . On and on it went ,at Penn-Jersey , Mathis ,American Car and yards with names mostly now forgotten .
It was once said that the Delaware River was the River Clyde of America.
Must have been something to have been a part of what is now gone forever !!
Let me know if anyone is interested in more history of the Delaware River .
God Bless Our Troops !!
Danny O'Kane USN.

Sunday, February 26, 2017

From: RICHARD BEGGS
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

Dan: Thanks for your informative post. I am glad to see there's someone else still alive willing to keep this web site alive.

Sunday, February 26, 2017

From: Danny O'Kane
E-Mail: dannyboydpo@rcn.com
Shop: 11 Shop

More History of Shipbuilding on The Delaware .
From 1940 to 1947,the period of war-era shipbuilding contracts,217 naval vessels were built along the Delaware River.The Philadelphia Navy Yard alone employed 50,000 people in the construction of the battleships WISCONSIN and the NEW JERSEY,the aircraft carrier ANTIETAM and the heavy cruiser CHICAGO,together with a long list of destroyers and other ships of war.
More history of shipbuilding on the Delaware to follow .
Danny O'Kane USN
11 Shop

Tuesday, February 21, 2017

Julio ,  Here's a little something to get the site going again .
 
During WWII the Philadelphia area was one of the greatest shipbuilding regions in the world . The Delaware River was lined with shipyards that employed around 150,000 workers .
On July 8 , 1945 , three shipyards simultaneously launched war vessels . The Philadelphia Navy Yard splashed into the river the cruiser PRINCETON . Upriver , Cramps Shipyard in Kensington , floated the submarine TUSK . Over in Camden , New York Ship launched the carrier , SAIPAN .
 
Watch this site for more history on shipbuilding on the Delaware River .
 
Thank you ,
Danny O'Kane
11 Shop

Tuesday, February 21, 2017

From: Rick Rinderer
E-Mail: rrinderer@comcast.net
Shop: 31 shop ReUnion

Shop 31 2017 Re Union

31 shop will be having a reunion on Saturday May 13, 2017, 12 noon until ?? at Chickie's and Pete's 1526 Packer Ave in South Philadelphia. All are welcomed (including spouses) There will be no need to purchase tickets for this reunion. We will have an area at the Piano bar where food and drink can be purchased individually. Please contact as many 31 shop people you may still be in contact with and spread the word. If you think you will be attending please email Rick Rinderer at rrinderer@comcast.net so we can get an idea of how many people will be interested in attending. Hope to see as many former 31 shop people as possible. at Chickie and Pete's on May 13

Sunday, February 19, 2017

From: Ron Miller
E-Mail: ronfish2002@yahoo.com
Shop: 31

"Russian spy ship spotted 30 miles off America's coast." Reminds me of the first sea trial for the USS Independence, 1986, maybe? We were somewhere off the coast of Virginia when the captain announced that an East German "fishing trawler" had been following us for the last two days. We could see the small ship off the starboard bow. I heard later that one of our helicopters flew over to take a closer look, but I didn't see that. A front row seat for Yardbirds to see a little Cold War action.
 

Wednesday, February 15, 2017

From: Dennis Kaiser
E-Mail: dennis_kaiser@outlook.com
Shop: Code 911

New e-mail address: dennis_kaiser@outlook.com

Monday, January 9, 2017

From: Cliff Nash
E-Mail: pnsycliff@aol.com
Shop: 06

Pleae list Obituary
06 shop Toolmaker

John F. Portscheller, Sr.

AGE: 90 • Blackwood

John F. Portscheller, Sr., passed away on January 5, 2017 at the age of 90 years. Devoted husband of the late Dorothy, who predeceased him in 2009 after 64 years of marriage. Beloved father of Joan Puglia (Russell) of Washington Twp., NJ, John F. Portscheller, Jr. of FL, and David E. Portscheller
(Lois) of Gloucester Twp., NJ. John was also predeceased by his two brothers, Frank and Joseph Portscheller.

John and Dorothy met as children. They married and almost immediately, John was shipped out to serve our Nation during WWII with the U.S. Army Air Corps. Dorothy accompanied him, lived on base, and worked odd jobs so that she could be close to John. John was a long time employee of the U.S. Naval Shipyard in Phila., where he retired as a foreman in 1985. He was an avid bowler, and an active member of numerous senior citizen clubs in Gloucester Twp. over the years, serving as President of several of them. He and his late wife traveled together extensively during their marriage, and enjoyed spending time at the casinos in Atlantic City.

Viewing will be Wednesday, Jan. 11th, 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM at Earle Funeral Home, 122 W. Church St., Blackwood, NJ 08012, where a prayer service will follow at 8:30 PM. Interment will be private. In lieu of flowers, contributions in his memory would be appreciated to the Camden County Animal Shelter, 125 County House Road, Blackwood, NJ 08012. Condolences and memories may be shared at www.earlefuneralhome.com

Friday, January 6, 2017

From: Jim Schaffner
E-Mail:
Shop: 56

Obituary for Kevin P. Meehan

Kevin P. Meehan 56 Shop PNSY

On January 3, 2017 of Washington Twp. Age 63. Beloved Husband of Patricia (nee O’Donnell). Devoted father of Sean P. (Michell), Timothy (Jill) and Kerry Meehan (Michelle). Loving grandfather of Gabby, Samantha, George, Liam, Cameron, Amanda, Mickey and Tommy.
Dear brother of Joseph F. Barnett, Jr., Michael B., Margaret F. and the late Martha Esher.

Kevin was a loving husband and a great dad. He battled courageously against every obstacle life threw at him. He loved "God , family and country." Kevin was the first in his family to graduate college. He was the epitome of the term lifelong learner.
When the closing of the Navy yard forced him to change careers, he went back to school to take education classes and ultimately became a teacher of his biggest love, history. He ultimately went on to earn his masters degree in educational administration.
Kevin's quest for knowledge didn't end there. He took classes in pipefitting, tuned in to any and all shows to do with history, read the newspaper cover to cover and even sat and read the encyclopedia like one might read a good novel. He traveled extensively in Europe to many counties to experience the sites where major events shaped history.
Kevin loved camping and hiking the Appalachian trail where he was famous for getting lost in the woods. He loved to tell corny jokes, provide text commentary during Eagles games and coin Kevinisms such as "going to the carnival is like buying a hot dog." He also loved God and helping others. He was a faithful member of the Knights of Columbus and a volunteer to his church's food pantry.
Kevin's first love was his family. His proudest accomplishment was his three sons who are honest, productive members of society now raising families of their own. He was happiest when surrounded by not only his immediate family but also his brothers, sisters, nieces and nephews.
Through his final moments he continued to selflessly think of others. Concerned about his wife and family rather than his own condition, he passed away as he lived life - on his terms.

Relatives and friends are invited to attend his viewing Friday
7:00-9:00 PM and Saturday 8:45-9:45 AM at the Egizi Funeral Home
119 Ganttown Rd., Washington Twp. Mass of Christian Burial 10:30 AM at Mary Mother of Mercy Parish/Our Lady of Lourdes RC Church, Glassboro. Entombment, All Saints Cemetery, Newfield.

In lieu of flowers, donations in Kevin’s memory may be made to Mary Mother of Mercy Parish, 500 Greentree Rd., Glassboro, NJ 08028.

Condolences may be shared with the family at www.egizifuneral.com

“A Life Well Lived
Is Worth Remembering”

Friday, January 6, 2017

Stella Brooks <sebrooks3@yahoo.com>

As you can see below, it has been three years since I have asked any questions. Boy our time on this planet flies by....

I was talked into writing another biography. This one for a Vietnam vet who is a quadriplegic. Not from Vietnam but flying in an airshow. I am so glad that I was led to this man because he has a beautiful outlook on life.

His father, David Saul Doctor, played on a Isthmus League in Panama while in the Navy---Submarine service?. The guess is between 1935 to 1938. It was a semi professional baseball league. I am hoping to find a newspaper article as proof he was there and was that good. Because he was a left handed, first baseman, who fielded a thousand and batted over 300. The Redsox and other's wanted him. But, for some reason, he did not sign.

An old base paper or area paper, magazine??

I cannot locate a museum or newspaper....

Do you have any idea where I might find any information regarding this team?

Sincerely,

Stella

Wednesday, January 4, 2017

From: Joe DeKraft
E-Mail: joedek@verizon.net
Shop: Shop 17, C/265, C/244

50 Years ago today, 01/04/1967 I started working at the Navy Yard for 17 Shop. That first day I was assigned to work for Jim Gullifer on U.S.S. John Paul Jones DDG-32, coworkers were Petey Burns, Jim Manzi (material man) & John Ficchi.
In those days the Sheetmetal Shop was located in 25 & 3 Buildings, just off Broad St & there was a metal plating shop between the two buildings.
Bill Dougherty, Nacho Perez & myself all ended up in the Helper Trainee program together.
Later while working in Nick Rizzo’s Gang (2nd floor, back of #25 building) I remember when they pulled the USS New Jersey from mothballs and temporarily parked it behind the shop for a short period before it was dry-docked, The Jersey was getting readied for Vietnam.
It's funny how I can remember this like it was yesterday and not remember things from six months back. Yeah I know why, I'm just not saying it. :-)

Sunday, January 1, 2017

From: Mike Dougherty
E-Mail: mikedougherty63@yahoo.com
Shop: 56 shop

Congratulations Gerry,I agree about PNSY being the best.I had a couple jobs that provided a comparison.In 1971 ,facing a RIF I went to Salem nuclear power plant.The Atlantic city local 121 was corrupt.The president of the local was the superintendent and he fired men arbitralily every day.Almost all the members were bosses and when the contractor tried to audit the toolroom there was a fire,all records destroyed .In five years I was laid off three times so local men who were fired by different contractors could take my place.I was so glad when John Bergan,the 754 steward got me back in PNSY,In 1992 the Career transition center found me a pipefitter job at the Corpus Christi Army Depot and I was happy G/F pay working with my hands.It sounds like bragging but I was the best they ever saw.I trained at PNSY.I worked ten years there before my second line supervisor,who did illegal things that I exposed,promoted a foreman who would fire me for failure ti notify.I was escorted by guards off the base in front of my men.I was a work leader.After a rough couple months I prevailed with the judge and got a retirement party during working hours,a clean form 50 and a ton of money.

Saturday, December 31, 2016

From: G EVANS
E-Mail: GEVANS1054@VERIZON.NET
Shop: SHOP 26

I worked at the PNSY for 38 years. I will be retired 28 years in 2017. I still have the shipyard, the people, the jobs in my mind.
THE GREATEST PLACE TO HAVE WORKED. May God bless all.

Friday, December 30, 2016

From: Robert Daley
E-Mail: hogdale@hotmail.com
Shop: Shop 51

Does everyone remember the yardbird that would go on top of the buildings with a mirror and shine in at the airplanes landing at the PIA ? I spoke to him, I think his name was Sammy? He actually thought he was directing the planes and helping them land. What a character.

Thursday, December 29, 2016

From: Mark Zeszut
E-Mail: mzootie@email.com
Shop: 38

I just was informed that this site existed by a former co-worker, Sailor John who I hadn't spoke with in 20 years. I routinely still think about all the people I had met and worked with and what became of them. I had so many fond memories that I have looked back on especially all of the characters and great people who worked there. I left the Yard right before it closed with the help of the career transition center.

I began my career at 19 years old as a Helper Trainee in 38 shop for about 8 months until the apprenticeship opened up. I remember being interviewed by Charlie McVey and Charlie Ross among others. I worked everywhere in the yard as part of the program. I really enjoyed working the flight deck catapult systems for the last 10 years that I was there. Wish I could have stayed and retired at PSNY. Still miss it to this day.

Wednesday, December 28, 2016

From: Harry Nickel
E-Mail: scuebdy@gmail.com
Shop: 41 shop/navsses

Mullen, John J. "Jack", age 79, of Collingdale PA. Beloved husband of Dolores M. Bennett Mullen and the late Joan (nee Roach). Mr. Mullen was married to his late wife Joan for 49 years. Mr. Mullen was a Boiler Maker for the Navy Shipyard in Phila, PA for over 35 years.

He enjoyed hosting barbeques with his family and friends and when not with them he attended many musicals.

After retiring Jack took up golf and played with a group of friends called "golf buddies".

Dear father of John J. (Susan) Jr., Nancy (Charlie) Hanlon, Dennis (Cathy), Kathy (Frank) Slattery, Trish (Dave) Loomis. Survived by 15 grandchildren. Also survived by the Bennett children; Chuck, Rick, Joe, Ralph, Jeanne, and Doris.

Relatives and friends are invited to Jack's viewing Thursday Evening December 29, 2016 7:00-9:00 P.M at The Knoetgen-Donohue Funeral Home, 746 Kedron Ave. (Rt 420) Morton, PA, and to his Funeral Mass on Friday December 30, 2016 10:30 AM at the Church of St. Joseph's, 500 Woodland Ave., Collingdale, PA. Interment SS. Peter and Paul Cemetery. In lieu of flowers contributions in Jack and Joan's memory may be made to Friends of Fair Acres, 340 N. Middletown Road, Lima, PA 19037.

Online condolences at www.donohuefuneralhome.com

Saturday, December 24, 2016

From: Dennis Kaiser
E-Mail: dennis_kaiser@outlook.com
Shop: Code 911

To all my friends and associates from the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard and The Naval Foundry and Propeller Center, I would like to extend the warmest of holiday greetings as well as my sincere hope that we all have a healthy and Happy New Year.

Dennis Kaiser

Saturday, December 24, 2016

From: Jim Yunker
E-Mail: yunkerjf@netzero.net
Shop: Shop 67

Spent 20 years in the Shipyard and 10 more over at PERA. The Yard was the best job I ever had. Loved working SLEP ! To all you ex Yardbirds and you're families MERRY CHRISTMAS and HAPPY NEW YRAR!
R/Jim Yunker

Friday, December 23, 2016

From: Tom Maiorano
E-Mail: tmaiorano1@verizon.net
Shop: 38 Shop

Wishing one and all, from my years at PNSY, a very Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year.

Friday, December 23, 2016

From: Jack Balkir
E-Mail: jbalkir@gmail.com
Shop: Code 1200

I would like to wish Merry Christmas and Happy New Year to all my yardbird friends. God bless you.

Thursday, December 22, 2016

From: Chris Mason
E-Mail: masoncs@comcast.net
Shop: x64, NAVSHIPSO, PERA (CV)

I'm wishing all who I worked with and knew @ PNSY a very Merry Christmas. 37 Christmases with D.O.N., both in and outside the 'Yard' fences provide me with some wonderful and scary memories. One scary moment, my first Christmas, Dec 1968, (I was a 1st year apprentice having worked in Yard a mere 4 months), when I walked a very tipsey 64 shop mechanic through the Marine Checkpoint at the Blindman's bus stop, on to Snyder Ave and the subway. I left him when I got off at the Broad & Erie stop. Ray returned to work after Christmas so he got home and survived OK

Merry Christmas Everyone!

Thursday, December 22, 2016

From: Ron Miller
E-Mail: ronfish2002@yahoo.com
Shop: 31

I think I told this tale about ten years ago, but maybe some newer correspondents missed it, and I like telling it, so here's my shipyard Christmas story. It was the last working day before the Christmas shutdown in 1994, our last Christmas before the closing of the Yard. A cloudy, cold, damp morning that chilled you to the bone. The weather matched the general mood of the workers. My carpool mate Bob Purdy and I waited for the shuttle bus. It was the "oldies bus." You remember, the driver had a little boom box propped on the dash, always tuned to WOGL. Bob and I grabbed the last two seats in the packed but gloomily quiet bus. From the radio came the voice of Gene Autry singing "Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer." Someone in the back began singing along. A few laughs, then some more singers. Soon the whole bus was belting it out, and gleefully shouting the last line, "You'll go down in historeee!!!" Applause and more laughter. Smiling faces exited the bus, wishing the driver a Merry and a Happy. A Christmas miracle on the oldies bus.

Monday, December 19, 2016

From: Peter Johnston
E-Mail: Twellthj@gmail.com
Shop: 56

Hello everyone, it's been quite some time, years since I've visited the site. I retired back at the end of July of this year with 35 plus years under the belt. I'm still living up in NH. I was looking over the past comments/experiences and saw that Jimmy Skay had passed away in October, I was very saddened to hear it, Jim was a swell guy. Happy holidays to everyone.....Oh, and a Happy New year!

Thursday, December 8, 2016

From: Cliff Nash
E-Mail: pnsycliff@aol.com
Shop: 06

John Peacock III

AGE: 78 • Williamstown

John J. Peacock III, age 78, of Williamstown, NJ, a loving Husband and devoted Father and Grandfather, died peacefully surrounded by his family on Sunday, December 4, 2016.

Predeceased by his parents John Jr. and Ellen (nee Spilker), he was born and raised in Philadelphia the eldest of five children.
He graduated from Bishop Neumann High School Class of 1956 and married the love of his life, Patricia, in May of 1960. Shortly afterwards he was called to military service and served his country as a solider and Military Police Officer in Europe as a member of the United States Army. Upon completion of his military service he resumed his 40 year civilian service career with the United States Navy at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, where he was awarded the Department of the Navy Meritorious Civilian Service Medal before his retirement. His greatest pleasure in retirement was spending time with and taking care of his wife, his children and most of all his grandchildren. An avid sports fan and a simple man who enjoyed completing the daily crossword puzzle, he spent more than 40 years positively impacting the lives of many young men and women coaching in Monroe Township Little League and Gloucester County CYO, coaching the St. Mary's Boys to championships in 1986, 1989 and 1991.

He is survived by his wife of more than 56 years Patricia (nee Devlin), his six children; John J. Peacock (Marie), Kathryn Mary Peacock, Karen Ann Collins (Kenneth Jr.), James J. Peacock (Lisa), Joseph G. Peacock (Kimberly) and Claire Marie Folk, his 18 grandchildren; Jena, Kristine, Victoria, Jacqueline, Amanda, Daniel, Andrew, John Jr., Patrick, Gerard, Evan, Brendan, Jack, Joseph, Carleigh, Dara, Charles and Jamie; his siblings Robert Peacock, Maryellen Nebe, William Peacock and Josephine Kelly, along with many cousins, nieces, nephews and in-laws.

Relatives and friends are invited to his visitation on Wednesday from 9:30 AM - 11:30 AM at Our Lady of Peace Parish/ St. Mary's RC Church, Main St. & Carroll Ave., Williamstown. Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at 12:00 PM. Interment with Military Honors at the Gloucester County Veterans Memorial Cemetery, Williamstown.

In lieu of flowers donations may made to St. Mary's School, 32 Carroll Ave., Williamstown, NJ 08094

Arrangements are under the direction of the BELL-HENNESSY FUNERAL HOME, Williamstown.

Condolences and memories may be shared online at www.bell- hennessy.com.

Funeral Home
Bell-Hennessy Funeral Home
420 S Main St Williamstown, NJ 08094
(856) 629-7244

Wednesday, December 7, 2016

From: Charles Miller
E-Mail: charles_milleriii@verizon.net
Shop: 56 Shop

With a sad heart I have to inform everyone that my Uncle Joseph Januszewski
"Blandly Joe" passed away December 2, 2016 at the age of 83. Services where private.
He worked as a Progressman

Wednesday, December 7, 2016

From: Dennis Kaiser
E-Mail: dennis_kaiser@outlook.com
Shop: Code 911

For the OBITUARY Section:

Mrs. Debra Whitehead Bergner, 61, Wife of the former Philadelphia Naval Shipyard Commander, Capt. Jon Bergner, passed away Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016, at VCU in Richmond from complications of multiple sclerosis.

Born Jan. 13, 1955, in Pocatello, Idaho, she was the daughter of Claude and Eleanor Whitehead. After graduating from high school, she enlisted in the U.S. Navy where she served with honor for more than 12 years, attaining the rank of Petty Officer First Class.
She was among the first women to be assigned to sea duty, as well as one of the first to become Surface Warfare Qualified in 1982.
After leaving the Navy in 1984, Mrs. Bergner served in various assignments for the U.S. Navy and completed her career as Equal Opportunity Officer for the Northeast states. In 1996, Mrs. Bergner and her husband moved to the Eastern Shore where they built a home in Hacks Neck. For the next 10 years she worked for the U.S. Postal Service in various post offices on the Shore. She was a member of The Eastern Shore Yacht & Country Club where she was active in the Ladies Golf Association and regularly played Mah Jongg. She served on the Board of Directors and was House Chairman for many years. For the past 10 years, Mrs. Bergner served as a state election official and was looking forward to joining the Daughters of The American Revolution (DAR). Among many hobbies, she particularly enjoyed fishing and researching genealogy. Mrs. Bergner is survived by her husband of 32 years, Jon Bergner, of Hacks Neck; brother, Steven Whitehead and sister, Claudia McCoy, both of Pocatello. She was step-mother and friend to Jeffrey Bergner, of Virginia Beach, and Gregory Bergner (Annie), of Portland, Ore. She is also survived by the light of her life, her granddaughter, Veda. Mrs. Bergner’s favorite organizations were Wounded Warriors, Accomack SPCA and The National Multiple Sclerosis Society. A Celebration of Life will be scheduled at a future date.




JOHN J. PEACOCK III,
At age 78 Was a former PNSY SLEP Supt. and Shop 38 Superintendent. John lived in Williams-town, NJ, and passed peacefully on Sunday, December 4, 2016.

He graduated from Bishop Neumann High School Class of 1956 and married the love of his life, Patricia, in May of 1960. Shortly afterwards he was called to military service and served his country as a solider and Military Police Officer in Europe as a member of the United States Army. Upon completion of his military service he resumed his 40 year civilian service career with the United States Navy at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, where he was awarded the Department of the Navy Meritorious Civilian Service Medal before his retirement. His greatest pleasure in retirement was spending time with and taking care of his wife, his children and most of all his grandchildren. An avid sports fan and a simple man who enjoyed completing the daily crossword puzzle, he spent more than 40 years positively impacting the lives of many young men and women coaching in Monroe Township Little League and Gloucester County CYO, coaching the St. Mary’s Boys to championships in 1986, 1989 and 1991.

He was a devoted father of John J. Peacock (Marie), Kathryn Mary Peacock, Karen Ann Collins (Kenneth Jr.), James J. Peacock (Lisa), Joseph G. Peacock (Kimberly) and Claire Marie Folk. Loving grand- father of 18 grandchildren. Dear bother of Robert Peacock, Maryellen Nebe, William Peacock and Josephine Kelly. Also surviving many cousins, nieces, nephews and in-laws.
Relatives and friends are invited to his Visitation on Wednesday
9:30 AM - 11:30 A.M. at Our Lady of Peace Parish/St. Mary's RC Church, Main St. and Carroll Ave., Williamstown. Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated 12:00 Noon. Interment Gloucester County Veterans Memorial Cemetery, Williamstown. In lieu of flowers donations may be made to St. Mary's School, 32 Carroll Ave., Williamstown, NJ 08094. Arrangements are under the direction of the BELL-HENNESSY FUNERAL HOME, Williamstown. Condolences and memories may be shared online at www.bell-hennessy.com.

Tuesday, December 6, 2016

From: RICHARD BEGGS
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

WHATS IN A NAME

We had a man in our shop whose first name was Baltasar, who was a retired navy CPO, and like most shipwrights, just a little off. He was, however, an excellent journeyman. He was on leave one payday, and came into the shop to get his check. He brought his dog, a big ugly boxer with its smashed in face. Baltasar was standing outside of our shop building 177, chatting with a few friends, along with his dog. A General Foreman Shipwright who frequently joked about Baltasar's surname and its rare use asked if the dog had a rare name also. No, baltasar said, but he's well trained. Hold your arms in a circle and say jump, Baltasar told the General Foreman. The General Foreman did just that. The dog responded as though he heard hump instead of jump. The General Foreman was embarrassed by the dog's amorous intentions, and quickly returned to the office. A few years later the shop was required to send 15 shipwrights to the Brooklyn navy yard to help complete two LSD's under construction when the yard got its closing notice. There were not enough volunteers willing to make the trip. Non volunteers were selected without any practice, policy or procedure shown. Baltasar was selected by the General Foreman Shipwright who was the butt of Baltasar's jump joke. Baltasar was the senior journeyman shipwright, retention wise, in the shop, and felt this should be considered. He was ordered to report to Brooklyn in a week. The yard received a congressional letter of inquiry prior to the shipwrights reporting date at Brooklyn. Baltasar was removed from the list of non volunteers. The letter stated that Baltasar was a caretaker of a sick person and must be excused. Baltasar confided to a few friends, that the sick person could no longer respond to the command "jump".

Saturday, December 3, 2016

From: RICHARD BEGGS
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

Christmas, at one time, was an event at the Shipyard. We even had Santa visiting, via helicopter. portrayed by a General Foreman Shipfitter named Stankey. Our shop invited girls from a local orphanage who were given gifts provided through donations of the shop members. I think other shops did this too. There were also celebrations in some codes and shops where food and beverages were served generously. The spirit of Christmas seemed to fade over the years as new Naval administrators frowned on any celebration, on the clock. Santa never visited again. The girls from the orphanage did not visit again. Some shops had Christmas parties after hours, off base. There were, however, some quiet clandestine exchanges of cups of good cheer in some places on Christmas eve.

Friday, November 11, 2016

From: Denny Borger
E-Mail:
Shop: 56

James Skay age 57 passed away 10/7/2016. Jimmy was a Pipe Fitter in Shop 56.

Monday, October 31, 2016

From: Tony Russo
E-Mail: krusso@ucsd.edu
Shop: 11 Shop Tank Tester

Wayne H. Brownhill, age 69, of Upland, PA, died peacefully at home on Wednesday, October 26, 2016, surrounded by his family. Wayne was born and raised in Chester, PA, and was a graduate of Chester High School, Class of 1965. Mr. Brownhill worked at the Philadelphia Navy Yard as a tank tester for many years. Wayne became a police officer in 1973, serving 28 years for Parkside and Upland Borough, until 2001. Wayne also worked at Crozer Chester Medical Center as a security guard for 21 years, before retiring in 2008. Wayne enjoyed being around his family and friends. He loved fishing, talking about the old days and listening to Doo Wop and the oldies. He also he enjoyed watching all sports, especially the Philadelphia Eagles.
Son of the late Ernest and Helen Lentz Brownhill and father of the late John Francis Brownhill.
Survivors:
Wife of 38 years: JoAnn Heck Brownhill
Sons: Jason (Nicole), Chris and Matt Brownhill
Brother: Glen (Pat) Brownhill
Grandchildren: Hayden, Jason and Carter
Funeral Service: Saturday, November 5th at 2:00PM at the Minshall Shropshire-Bleyler Funeral Home, Ltd., Middletown (Rte. #352) & Knowlton Rds., Middletown Twp., Media, PA 19063.
Visitation: Saturday, November 5th after 12:30PM at the funeral home.
Interment: Private
In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to: Basel Cell Syndrome Nevus, 14525 N. Cheshire Street, PO Box 321, Burton, OH 44021.

Friday, October 21, 2016

From: Danny O'Kane
E-Mail: dannyboydpo@rcn.com
Shop: 11 Shop

Bob Huegel age 64 , former Ship fitter at PNSY 11 Shop passed away on Oct. 18 , 2016 . Viewing on Saturday , Oct . 22 at Saint Gabriel's Church in Norwood , Pa from 8:30 to the start of his Funeral Mass at 10:00 am . Obit was in The Daily Times , Oct 20 ,2016 .

Thursday, October 20, 2016

From: JACK BALKIR
E-Mail: JBALKIR@GMAIL.COM
Shop: 51 SHOP / CODE 1200

I would like to thank everyone coming to 2016 PNSY Reunion Night and sharing our priceless memories and laughs making the night very special.

My personal appreciation to Julio Casiano for the precious photos he provided by highlighting this very special night.

Hopefully, see you all at 2017 PNSY Reunion.

Visit our website www.pnsyreunion.com for reunion information.

Tuesday, October 18, 2016

From:
E-Mail:
Shop:

Fiore A. Troncone, age 96 of Collingswood, passed away on October 16, 2016.

Beloved husband of the late Marie A. (nee Gimello); Devoted father of Anthony and John (Tina); Loving grandfather of Natalie, Lana and Lucas; Dear brother of Carmella Soda and the late Thomas Troncone; Also survived by many loving nieces and nephews.

Prior to his retirement, Mr. Troncone was employed as a coppersmith/pipefitter with NY Shipbuilding and then the Philadelphia Naval Yard. He was a United States Navy Veteran, serving during World War II, a member of the Catholic Knights of St. George, and a longtime parishioner of St. Johns Church in Collingswood.

Relatives and friends are invited to the Visitation and Funeral on Thursday from 10 AM at the Parish of Blessed Teresa of Calcutta, Church of St. John, 809 Park Avenue in Collingswood,NJ where a Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at 11 AM. Entombment will follow at Calvary Mausoleum in Cherry Hill.

In lieu of flowers, please make donations in his name to St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, 501 St. Jude Place, Memphis, TN 38105.

Saturday, October 15, 2016

From: Bruce Lafferty
E-Mail: bwlafferty@yahoo.com
Shop: 17 Shop & Code 920

I just wanted to thank Jack Balkir for his work on the 2016 Reunion. It was a good time and it was great to see old friends, reminisce and share a few laughs. Thanks again Jack

Saturday, October 15, 2016

From: Julio Casiano
E-Mail: Julio@Philly-Yardbird.com
Shop: 67964-026

There was a problem with my server forwarding posts submitted here but I've straightened it out.

If anyone submitted messages recently that did not get posted, please resubmit.

Thursday, September 29, 2016

From: Jim Williams
E-Mail: Jimdaddy.williams@gmail.com
Shop: x56/07/PW

Robert Feldbaum former x56 employee and shop steward died Sept 27, 2016. Bob was a graduate of West Phila. Catholic High School for boys in 1965. Was an Army Ranger (wounded) during the Vietnam war. He also was a Veterans Services Officer, helping other veterans by directing them to the proper personnel to obtain their V.A. benefits.
Funeral arrangements are scheduled for Sat. Oct 1st at O'Leary's funeral home in Springfield Pa.....visitation hrs are between 8:30 a.m. and 10:30 a.m.

Wednesday, September 28, 2016

From: Corcoran Family
E-Mail:
Shop:

Obituary: Eileen Corcoran Brennan - Code 302

Eileen Corcoran Brennan of Collingdale passed away on August 17 at Little Flower Manor with her devoted sisters by her side. Eileen was born on the Fourth of July and enjoyed all things patriotic and red, white and blue. She was a 1964 graduate of Collingdale High School and a long- time resident of the borough. She was a dedicated member of the high school alumni association, serving as treasurer, secretary, and chairman of the sunshine and hospitality committees. She enjoyed participating in the alumni events and for many years represented the association in the annual fourth of July parade. She was employed by the Federal Government for over 42 years; working at Defense Personnel Supply Center, The Philadelphia Naval Shipyard and retiring in May 0f 2015 from the Department of Homeland Security. She had a talent for writing poetry, enjoyed singing and spent many years researching her family history and building her family tree. An avid animal lover, Eileen adopted and rescued many cats throughout the years.

In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations be made to the Collingdale High School Alumni Association in Eileen's name for the establishment of a scholarship to be given to a deserving student. Donations can be sent to Collingdale High School Alumni Association, PO Box 1426, Collingdale, PA 19023 (please include Eileen's name with your gift).

To share your fondest memories of Eileen, please visit http://www.lifecelebration.com/ Life Celebration services provided by Leaver/Cable of Buckingham

Monday, September 26, 2016

From: G EVANS
E-Mail: GEVANS1054@VERIZON.NET
Shop: SHOP 26

MEMORABLE MOMENTS
Working the undocking and christening of the DLG 12 AND 13, on a Saturday morning. It was standby in case of emergency. At the head of "F" we had a portable welding ready for any problem. The Ship's Supt. came out and asked who has the STRIKING PLATES? The Ship fitter and I said what the Hell are they. He showed us a field drawing. The were just 2 plates with a knife edge. They were to be welded on the bow of the ships so it was easy to brake the champagne bottle. None of the bldgs.were open in order to get material. A second look at the drawing look like the practice plates used in the Welding School. Off we went and took 2 plates from the School. Welded them on the bow with the painter standing behind with brush in hand

Sunday, September 18, 2016

From: mike dougherty
E-Mail: mikedougherty63@yahoo.com
Shop: 56 shop

In 1970 I was an apprentice on loan to the laggers doing finish work on the Blue Ridge.We were installing rubber in air conditioned berthing areas.The boss asked if I wanted to work the weekend and I said sure.The next day they marched us over to pier 5 where a destroyer had had a fire in her aft fire room.We removed,bagged and transported a small mountain of lagging over the next two days with the lagger G/F at the top of the vertical ladder keeping track the whole time.I earned every nickel of pay and learned to respect what the laggers do.I also learned to take care volunteering.

Sunday, September 18, 2016

From: G EVANS
E-Mail: GEVANS1054@VERIZON.NET
Shop: SHOP 26

MORE FYI
On the LPH 3 and 7 "F" strake was the rivet strake. Using rivets required a team of 4 workers. the Heater, the Catcher, the Back Up Man, the Shaper. The Heater had a fire pot with coke coal, hooked up to an air line. He would heat the rivets to cherry red. They would be send down though flexible metal tube to catcher who in turned place the rivet in drilled hole. The Back Up Man would hold the rivet in he hole with a large chipping gun and a shaped tool head. The Shaper would beat his side of the cherry red rivet until it filled his countersunk hole. He then flushed the rivet with the shell. I tried to be backup for two rivets. Poor choice.
LPH 7. Hauck bolt came into vogue. The Supt 11 Shop jumped the gun and order Huck bolts to be used instead of rivets. The job started and after a short time it was stopped. There was no approved for large Bolts. The job was held up for weeks and the began to drill out the bolt installed. An ok came through and work began again.
New Processes to be used on newconstruction require NAVSEA approval. The Shipyard's certification, and the individuals qualification.

Saturday, September 17, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

PATHS OF GLORY

There were probably orthodox methods for a journeyman from the shops to get a transfer to Design Division. They were, in most part, lateral transfers with no immediate raise in pay, approved by their respective department heads. There were other means, jokingly called athletic scholarships. Design division had one of the best softball teams in the Shipyard. They recruited exceptional players from the shops to join their roster, and subsequently Design division rolls. I'm sure they performed their duties in Design as well as on the field in an exceptional manner. Some migrated to other codes when their activity on the field was over, and distinguished themselves there as well. As Jerry Evans noted in one of his many posts, "its who knows you" that's important at times.

Friday, September 16, 2016

From: Danny O'Kane
E-Mail: dannyboydpo@rcn.com
Shop: 11 Shop

September 16 , 2016 , National POW/MIA Recognition Day .
Say a prayer for those still missing .
God Bless Our Troops !!

Friday, September 16, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

Back in the early 60's our shop felt that there was an uncooperative relationship between the shop foremen and P&E planners. A short lived program was introduced requiring a swap of positions between a foreman and a P&E planner. I suppose it was to allow each man to see the other's day to day problems. Only one such swap was made. I don't know if it solved anything. I never had a problem, myself, with any P&E planner that wasn't resolved.

Friday, September 16, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

Thanks Dennis, I must have missed it on the other ships built at the yard.

Thursday, September 15, 2016

From: Dennis Kaiser
E-Mail: dennis_kaiser@outlook.com
Shop: Code 911

Mr. Beggs,... It is called the bilge strake. Most if not all surface ships has a riveted strake at the bilge and at the sheer strake (Shearsvb strake: is a special strake of the Side plating. It is the strake that connects the Side Shell to the Strength Deck.) I believe it is to allow some flexibility so that in very rough seas, the ship won’t break.

Thursday, September 15, 2016

From: Jerry Kane
E-Mail: Zuri29@Cox.net
Shop: 67, 273, 235, PERA

Another LPH story. About 15 years ago, my next door neighbor here in Virginia Beach was getting ready deploy on USS Guam LPH-9. This was going to be Guam's final deployment prior to decommissioning. Knowing that Dad (Jerry Kane of x11) had worked some new construction LPHs, I mentioned this to him. He told me that @ 1964 he and Jimmy Quinn were working on the furnace slab, forming shell plates for Guam when the Navy announced that they would be closing a Navy Yard. They commiserated and started making job hunting plans. assuming that PNSY would be the one chosen. They were quick shocked (and pleased) when the Navy decided to close Boston instead.

Thursday, September 15, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

One unique aspect of the shell platting on the LPH'S was a lapped strate that ran about 100 feet fwd and aft of midships just above the turn of the bilge, that was riveted. No other ship that I worked on used riveted shell plates. I never did understand the engineering principles involved that required a riveted strate of shell platting. Perhaps some shipfitters may know.

Wednesday, September 14, 2016

From: Tom queenan
E-Mail: Tmquee@verizon .net
Shop: 26/231

Mr. Worff and mr. Beggs,
Awesome historical recollections. Very much appreciated.

Wednesday, September 14, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

A DAY TO REMEMBER

I was working on the LPH construction in dry dock 4 on November 22, 1963. A little after lunch a shipfitter who had a small portable radio told us that President Kennedy was shot in Dallas. A few hours later it was confirmed that he died. Not much was done for the rest of that Friday. I was watching tv on Sunday and saw Oswald shot on live tv at the Dallas police headquarters. I think everyone alive at the time remembers those days, and the funeral a week later.

Tuesday, September 13, 2016

From: Ed Worff
E-Mail: edsw051@verizon.net
Shop: 51 Test Gang & Code 365

On the day JFK was shot I was a third year 51 Shop apprentice working in the pilot house of a destroyer undergoing FRAM modernization at Pier 6. Walking delicately on the bones of a false deck to pull cables, my foot slipped and my leg went into the cylinder for the steering stand, ripping my shin open to the bone. The mechanic I was working with immediately told me to find our Leadingman and get a dispensary pass. Just as I found him at the head of Pier 6 someone came by and said that the President had been shot. The boss called for a taxi to take me to the dispensary and hustled off to find a radio to get more news. I think I waited about 20 minutes for the taxi, blood seeping past my own handkerchief which I had used as a bandage. When I got to the dispensary it took a few minutes to find someone who broke away from the news long enough to treat me with a tetanus shot and heavy bandages interrupted by news flashes about the events in Dallas. It could not be stitched because of the location and lack of skin. The doc said that I would have to see the folks at the Naval Hospital on Sunday for follow-up. I called for a taxi back to the work site and found my supervisor. It was almost 4:00 so he told me to just get my tools and sit down near the brow until the whistle blew. He also reminded me to make sure that I sow up on Monday so that there would not be a "Lost Time Accident" for him to report. I had a similar delay in treatment at the Naval Hospital on that Sunday because that is the day that Oswald was shot and the staff was paying more attention to that event again. My scar still reminds me of the events that took place then.

Tuesday, September 13, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

THOSE WERE THE DAYS

One of my most interesting jobs as a journeyman was during the construction of the LPH's. Our shop provided bench marks for the placement of the decks, frames and bulkheads of the internal structural of the ships. We also provided water line heights for the shell plating, called sight edges. Each shell plate had its own unique shape and location determined by the mold loft. It was a sign of good shipbuilding skills when all the horizontal butts of the shell plating were in one continuous line from stem to stern, as well as all the vertical butts in one plumb line from the main deck to the keel. It was the welding process that was impressive. It was an exact controlled process. The extreme heat and energy caused by the welding could cause distortions in the shell plating if not controlled. We provided check points at certain points selected by 26 shop that were monitored during the welding by the Foreman welder. The welding was often stopped in one location and moved to another if the Foreman welder noticed intolerances at the check points. An experienced shipbuilder could look at the shell plating of a ship and determine the skills of its builder. The ships built at the Shipyard demonstrated its skills in every case.

Monday, September 12, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

THE STING

Some General Foreman who were in that position around 1985-87 may remember an assignment they received to perform desk audits of the General Foremen in their shops. It was at a time when new guide lines from OPM relative to Supervisory ratios in general, and General Foremen to Foremen in particular. A public relations firm, which included a former General Foremen from the Charlestown Navy Yard, was to collect the data from the audits for analysis and recommendations for reducing the General Foremen ranks in the Shipyard. The General Foremen selected to conduct the audits were all senior in their shop and would not be affected by any RIF action. Some of the General Foremen were officers in the Federal Managers Association, the organization that would be responsible to represent their members in any adverse action appeals, such as a RIF. The inherent conflicts of the exercise were apparent. The General Foremen conducting the desk audits were not trained, nor qualified for the task. It was all a public relations exercise to show that the General Foremen of the Shipyard decided their own ratios in the interest of more efficient management. The desk audits were completed. I don't know if any audit recommended that any shop had too many General Foemen. My shop did not demote any General Foremen, and I don't know of any shop that did. New positions were being created, such as Slep Supt's that in fact created new openings for General Foremen. It was all sound and no fury. The public relations firm departed for Norfolk where I'm sure they were well received.

Monday, September 12, 2016

From: Julio Casiano
E-Mail: Julio@Philly-Yardbird.com
Shop: 67964-026

The prison's still there.  They have about 4500 inmates in low and medium security.  Most of the inmates I worked with were in for drug charges, but they have everything from mobsters to child porn offenders there.

Monday, September 12, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

Julio:

I don't think many people know that there was a Federal Prison at Fort Dix. What type of inmates are there kept there? White collar? Drug dealers?

Sunday, September 11, 2016

From: Julio Casiano
E-Mail: Julio@Philly-Yardbird.com
Shop: 67964-026

9/11

Everyone from my generation and before can tell you where they were when they heard of JFK's assassination.  I was in second grade class at St. Edward's in North Philly when the announcement came over the PA and I remember the teacher starting to cry. Of course, at the time I had no understanding of the historical impact of this announcement.

On 09/11/2001 I was working at the Federal Correctional Institution in Fort Dix, NJ.  In 1993, I had transferred from the 'Yard to the Federal Bureau of Prisons. I was an inmate work detail supervisor in the welding shop of the facilities department.

FCI Fort Dix was such a big prison that they bought EZGO's for staff to get around in.  They couldn't call them golf carts for requisitioning purposes because they didn't want the public to think we had golf courses for the inmates so they called them LEEPS (Lightweight Electrical Employee Propulsion Systems).  We would take the standard LEEPS and 'Trick' them out by souping them up and adding other modifications.  My inmates installed a car radio in our LEEPS that I had taken out of a Ford Escort I owned.

On the morning of September 11, 2001, one of my inmates came into my office and said that he heard on that radio that a plane had crashed into the World Trade Center.  At the time I remember thinking that a plane had crashed into the Empire State Building back in the '40s.

Friday, September 9, 2016

From: G EVANS
E-Mail: GEVANS1054@VERIZN.NET
Shop: SHOP 26

SKILLS
Not all people have the same skill level. Even at the same job level there is a variation. The supervisor's job is to place the person in the position that he will succeed. No how good you think you may be, there is always someone better.

Friday, September 9, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

Dave:

A couple of my Foremen had one of those connex boxes on the east side of Dry Dock 4. I had to intervene when they were looking for a supplier of wall to wall carpets.

Thursday, September 8, 2016

From: Bruce Conte
E-Mail: sphilly_20659@yahoo.com
Shop: Numerous

Sad news.. the passing of Mike O'Keefe.

Mike was one of the best...EVER. I had the pleasure of working with and befriending Mike in P&E (Code 236). We both relocated to other installations and we would speak to each other by phone every few months. RIP Mike. You will be missed.

O'KEEFE MICHAEL J., on Sept. 3, 2016. age 67. Beloved husband of JoAnne M. (nee Nicholl), loving father of Brian and Erin, dear son of the late John and Marie O'Keefe, dear brother of Gerard and Deidre O'Keefe and the late Maureen Aptowicz; also survived by many loving relatives and friends. Relatives and friends are invited to call Friday 6 to 8 P.M. and Sat. 8:30 to 9:30 A.M. at GALZERANO FUNERAL HOME, 9304 OLD Bustleton Ave. (below Welsh Rd.). Funeral Mass 10 A.M. Maternity B.V.M. Church. Int. Resurrection Cemetery. In lieu of flowers family prefers donations to Fox Subacute at Warrington, 2644 Bristol Rd., Warrington, PA 18976. - See more at: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/philly/obituary.aspx?pid=181326636#sthash.gjAiNbKD.dpuf

Thursday, September 8, 2016

From: Jim Merkins
E-Mail: jjmerkins@gmail.com
Shop: 06/31/81

Sorry to hear about Jim Parkinson. He was a talented guy, not only Trivia but organization of many sporting activities in Shop 31. Anyone in the Machine Shop knew about the LVR. Sad times, RIP Jimmy....RIP

Thursday, September 8, 2016

From: Robert Daley
E-Mail: hogdale@hotmail.com
Shop: 51

Hello Richard,
When I read your comment about an unskilled wood worker being made foreman when the SLEP program started, I wasn't surprised at all. When the SLEP program started, that was the beginning of the end of the PNSY. There were many people made foreman that should not have been and many workers hired that should not have been. I left PNSY a couple years after the SLEP started because I saw the quality of the work that the yard was doing start to deteriorate. It was sad to watch.

Thursday, September 8, 2016

From: David Williams
E-Mail: tblkane@aol.com
Shop: 99 Shop Electrician

Mr Wizard is what some of you called me back in those days. I was a you man right out of school. There some good times had. And some friends made. And many stories. Air Plane Sammmy directing the planes in over Dry Dock 5. I probably worked with most of the shops26,72,64.38.11,17 providing lights, ventilation, welding equipment and of coarse heat and air conditioning in those illegal connex boxes on and in the dry docks. Which had every thing from hide outs to barber shops. I miss those card games at lunch and the shit house lawyers, singers and people selling things(11 shop guy I think ) . Hope all that are still here a safe and happy journey.

Dave

Tuesday, September 6, 2016

From: Bud Murray
E-Mail: Junkall@msn.com
Shop: 38

RODIER, PATRICK P. 61 - of Sea Isle City, passed away on Monday, November 19, 2012 surrounded by his loving family and friends at Cape Regional Medical Center.

Patrick was born in Hammonton and was a resident of Sea Isle City for many years.

He was a Veteran of the United States Air Force. Patrick worked as a Bar Manager for the Sea Isle City V.F.W. Post #1963, where all the members were an extended family to him. He had also worked for the Philadelphia Naval Ship Yard in Philadelphia, PA and was a member of the Somers Point American Legion. He was an avid sports fan and oldies enthusiast.

Surviving are his children, James, Patrick, Christopher, Matthew Rodier and their mother Barbra all of Somerdale, step daughter, Lisa Marie of Cape May Court House, step granddaughter, Celena Marie, his loving companion, Mary Van Atter, his siblings, Ann Rodier, Edward Rodier (Sandy). Stephen Rodier (Madelyn), Margaret Chernow, Jean Kinslow (Gary), Mary Liberato, Thomas Rodier, Dorothy McClain, Kathryn Rodier, and Philip Rodier (Susan). He was predeceased by his parents, Edward and Anna Rodier and a brother, James Rodier.

A Catholic Prayer Service will be offered Friday at 12 o'clock noon from The Godfrey Funeral Home of Palermo, 644 South Shore Road, Palermo, NJ where friends may call from ten o'clock until the time of service. Burial will be private.

Memorial donations may be made at a fundraiser scheduled for Patrick at Lacosta's Lounge, JFK and Landis Avenue, Sea Isle City, NJ on Sunday, December 9, 2012 from 1 PM until 5PM.

Tuesday, September 6, 2016

From: Bud Murray
E-Mail: Junkall@msn.com
Shop: 38

Thomas Phillip “Bear” Cowden, Sr., 54, of Virginia Beach, VA, passed away July 9, 2005.

A native of Philadelphia, PA, he was the son of the late Thomas and Shirley Cowden. He was an installation representative for NAV-AIR with 24 years of service. He was a member of St. Nicholas Catholic Church, the Knights of Columbus and the Lynnhaven Sports Club.

He is survived by his beloved wife of 33 years, Margaret “Marge” G. Cowden; two daughters, Nanci L. Cowden and Shannon T. Cowden, and a son, Thomas B. “Tommy” Cowden, all of Virginia Beach, VA. He is also survived by a brother, Michael T. Cowden of Philadelphia, PA; and two grandchildren, Tommy M. Cowden and Hannah L. Cowden; as well as the rest of his large loving family. He was predeceased by a sister, Nancy Cowden.

A Mass of the Resurrection will be conducted Wednesday at 11 a.m. at St. Nicholas Catholic Church with Rev. Msgr. Raymond Barton officiating. The burial will be private. The family will greet friends at the church one hour prior to the service. Memorials in lieu of flowers may be made to Va. Beach Volunteer Rescue Squad, 745 Virginia Beach Blvd., Virginia Beach, VA 23451. Hollomon-Brown Funeral Home, Lynnhaven Chapel is handling the arrangements. The family invites those wishing to do so to wear dressy tropical clothing for the service.

Tuesday, September 6, 2016

From: Tom queenan
E-Mail: Tmquee@verizon.net
Shop: 26/231

Mr. Beggs,
The apocalypse did not happen and you still got your retirement check,so what's the point! Enjoy your stories but bringing someone down,years after some perceived episode,says more about you than the person you are referring to.

Sunday, September 4, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

DUMB AND DUMBER - CONTINUED

The heat enclosures were made in two pieces and were bolted together to fit around the shaft. A destroyer in dry dock two had a heat enclosure ready to be removed for the inspection of the cured rubber. The foreman sent the woodcraftsman into the dock to remove the heat enclosure. I got a call from a 38 shop G/F. He said you have to come down into the dock.did You will have to see this. I went into the dock and met the G/F from 38 shop. He pointed to the shattered remains of the heat enclosure. He said our man didn't have any tools to unbolt the enclosure. Instead he used a six foot piece of pipe to beat on the enclosure until it was demolished. He said he had never seen anything like it. Our woodcraftsman showed no remorse for his stupidity. He said he completed his assignment. We made a new enclosure. The woodcraftsman was never again given any tasks that required rational thought. He faded into the background. I thought it was a sign of the apocalypse when he was promoted to Foreman on the Independence slep overhaul years later.

Friday, September 2, 2016

From: Rosemary Davis
E-Mail: SPhillyRoe@comcast.net
Shop: Code 302

Eileen Brennan who worked in Code 302, Production Department's Budget Section, along with John Petrose and Julie McGlynn, passed away on August 17, 2016. She recently retired from US Customs and Border Protection in May 2015.

Thursday, September 1, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

DUMB AND DUMBER

We pay tribute to the men we worked with and honor those who have departed. In a perfect world every shipmate was intelligent and skilled in his craft. In the real world, however, some employees we worked with and supervised should have never been hired. One former apprentice Woodcraftsman was an example. He lacked the basic skills to perform the most simple task, even though he had completed an apprenticeship. Common sense was an element he never developed. One task our shop had was to build and install heat enclosures over the shaft couplings to help cure the rubber coatings that were applied. The enclosures were made in two pieces that were bolted togea

Thursday, August 25, 2016

From: JACK BALKIR
E-Mail: jbalkir@gmail.com
Shop: 51 SHOP / CODE 1200

Hello Everyone,

I reserved Friday, October 14, 2016 date, from 5 to 8 PM, with The Victor's Pub at Camden Waterfront for our reunion event since most of the Saturday dates were taken for the season.

The cost will be the same as before, $20.00 per person for self serve buffet including coffee, tea, soft drinks and gratuity, plus optional $15.00 bar wrist band payable at the check in. Please let me know in advance if you are going to purchase the wrist band so I can reserve them in advance.

As always, your guest(s) are welcome to the reunion event. Please let me know the name(s) of your guest(s) when you send your payment.

Please contact your fellow yard-birds, you are in touch with, regarding this event since I do not have the contact information on some of them. PASS THE WORD!

The reunion payments are due on or before September 30, 2016, and please make your checks payable to:

Jack Balkir
3808 Inwood Ln
Philadelphia, PA 19154
Cell: 267-777-3936

DO NOT SEND CASH PLEASE.

Please contact me if you have any questions or concerns. Looking forward seeing you all at the reunion.

Wednesday, August 24, 2016

From: Trish Peck
E-Mail: peckocean@yahoo.com
Shop: 81, NAVSHIPSO, QAO

Details

PARKINSON, ANTHONY JAMES, Jr. ("Jim"), age 69, of Villas, NJ has gone to rest with his Lord on Monday, August 8, 2016 after a long illness. Jim was born in Philadelphia, PA; formerly lived in Drexel Hill, PA; and has been a Cape May area resident since 1991. He is the son of the late Anthony Sr., and the late Beatrice (nee Heineman) Parkinson. Jim was a graduate of Bishop Neumann High School in South Philadelphia, PA. He served his country in the US Army in Vietnam 1967-1968, where he received a Purple Heart. Jim worked at the Naval Ship Yard as a Machinist in Philadelphia until retirement in 2005. He taught machinist classes and wrote instructional manuals on procedures while working there. Jim attended St Raymond’s RC Church, was a member of the Villas Fishing Club, the DAV in Del Haven, and the Purple Heart Association. He is survived by his wife of 41 years Marcia (Nee Mitchell) Parkinson and his sons: James (Nicole) Parkinson & Rick Parkinson. Also surviving are: his sisters: Bebe (Chink) Flannigan & Lorraine Parkinson; his brother Dick (Pat) Parkinson; and his grandson Tyler; numerous nieces & nephews; and many friends who were like family. Jim was well known for his talent for trivia at the Villas Fishing Club and his sense of humor. He was a “true gentleman” who will be fondly remembered. There will be a Mass of Christian Burial at 11:00 AM on Friday, August 12, 2016 at the Parish of St John Neumann, St John of God RC Church, 680 Townbank Rd, North Cape May, NJ 08204; where friends will be received from 10:00 to 11:00 AM. Interment will follow at Cape May County Veteran’s Cemetery, 127 Crest Haven Rd, Cape May Court House, NJ 08210. The family suggests donations in Jim’s memory to St Jude Children’s Hospital, 501 St Jude Place, Memphis, TN 38105. To share condolences, please visit www.evoyfuneralhome.com.

Monday, August 22, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

I attended a pre-retirement seminar sponsored by the Shipyard before I retired in 1987. The speaker was very knowledgeable and his predictions were accurate. He advised us to lock in any Bank Cd for the longest term available. He predicted that the current CD interest rate of 10% would soon nose dive. I don't think he thought it would go as low as less than 1%, or that we would see zero COLA'S for three out of the last eight years, or that the COLA formula would be changed to reflect an increase less than the current cost of living calculation. He warned everyone not to rely on interest from saving to meet our cost of living. I'm glad I attended that seminar and took his advice.

Sunday, August 21, 2016

From: tom maiorano
E-Mail: tmaiorano1@verizon.net
Shop: 38 Shop

Mr. Beggs, once again, PNSY came through and helped where needed. I pensioned out August, 1997, not because I wanted to, but because of the RIF. Had we not closed, I would be celebrating my 40th year of government service. On the up side, it survived 195 years of ship building and repair. PNSY forever.

Sunday, August 21, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

SOS

There are customs and maritime law for aiding ships in distress. I don't think there is a distinction where the ship is when it asks for help, whether its at sea, or upon a river or lake. On one occasion while waiting on the caisson of dry dock two while the dock was being flooded, we saw a small sail boat, under power, turn from its course up river, and head straight for us. It smartly berthed at pier 5 adjacent to the caisson. The skipper on board said he had a bad leak, and his bilge pump wasn't working. 99 shop quickly sent for a pump. A yard cop arrived before the pump and told the man that he and his boat had to leave. The deck was almost awash when 99 shop, ignoring the cop, lowered the pump to the deck of the boat. The pump was quickly taken below and was soon discharging water overboard. The yard cop stood watch while the repairs were made. Upon completion, the skipper thanked 99 shop for its aid, and returned on his course up river. The incident never m!
ade the Beacon or the evening news. 99 shop had, however, fulfilled an age old tradition of aiding a ship in distress.

Friday, August 19, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

Chris: You are right. It would have been a real challenge to provide any type of staging. The crane and brow was the only option.

Thursday, August 18, 2016

From: Chris Mason
E-Mail: masoncs@comcast.net
Shop: x64, NAVSHIPSO, PERA (CV)

Dick Beggs, a comment to your Aug 5 "A LARGE LIFT NEEDED" submission. I was new 1st Line Supervisor, working for you or Bill Ott and the hammer head crane staging job was going to be my responsibility, over the Christmas shutdown. I remember climbing to top (elevator to machinery level), checking out house structure and walking roof (with a pretty strong, cold wind) and someone from P&E taking pictures. Let me say, I'm not sorry the Yard decided to bring in that mobile crane to do that job!

Tuesday, August 16, 2016

From: JACK BALKIR
E-Mail: JBALKIR@GMAIL.COM
Shop: 51 SHOP / CODE 1200

Bill Woods worked for me when I was a foreman in 51 Shop. He was one the nicest and calmest guy you wanted him to work for you, everybody liked Bill. Rest in peace my friend, we are going to miss you.

Friday, August 12, 2016

From: Dennis Kaiser
E-Mail: dennis_kaiser@outlook.com
Shop: Code 911

William (Billy) Woods Passed away August 10, 2016.

Bill, Former 51 shop employee at PNSY and beloved husband of Patricia (nee Amerman); dear father of William M., and Kimberly (Brian) Moore; dear grandfather of Madison, William, Breann, Karli and Maci. Relatives and friends are invited to attend his Viewing Monday, 9:30 A.M, from THE EDWARD J. PETNER FUNERAL HOME (Family Owned and Operated), 6421 Frankford Ave. at Levick St. Christian Burial Service 11 A.M. Int. private. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in Bill's memory to VITAS Hospice, 1787 Sentry Parkway West, Bldg. 16, Suite 400, Blue Bell PA 19422.

Friday, August 12, 2016

From: RICHARD BEGGS
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

MERIT PROMOTION?

I can remember when positions of a higher pay grade were filled through the Merit Promotion Program. I am sure it must have been used to fill that progressman position, to some degree.

Friday, August 12, 2016

From: G EVANS
E-Mail: GEVANS1054@VERIZON.NET
Shop: SHOP 26

Not me Mike. Bad bet for 26 Shop. We had people who filed grievances for putting a buck up in their names.

Thursday, August 11, 2016

From: G EVANS
E-Mail: GEVANS1054@VERIZON.NET
Shop: SHOP 26

MAYBE ITS WHO KNOWS YOU
Called into Ship's Supt Office by an X64 Shop Foreman who was now a supervisor in Bldg. 11. He said he has been off the iron too long. He showed four names and ask if I know any person, for he has to select one for Progress. I did and told him this 72 Shop Rigger was an apprentice with us in 650 Bldg. He than remember. A week or so later is saw the 72 Shop person with a new hard hat marked PROG.

Thursday, August 11, 2016

From: mike dougherty
E-Mail: mikedougherty63@yahoo.com
Shop: 56 shop

In the eighties my boss made me chairman of my shops cfc drive.He told me he had bet the welder superintendent 100 bucks that our shop would have a higher participation and he wanted to win.A couple weeks later we were behind so I bought 10 lottery tickets,made copies of the numbers and told the men that anyone who comtributed a buck to the cfc would share in the winnings if the tickets hit.This worked so well that the cfc investigated.Some of the guys had signed up for payroll deduction and the one buck too.I sweated the lottery drawing when one of the tickets almost won,I probably would have been fired.So Gerry did you ever lose a bet on the combined federal campaign?

Monday, August 8, 2016

From: G EVANS
E-Mail: GEVANS1054@VERIZON.NET
Shop: SHOP 26

HERO FOR A DAY
My first sub as a supervisor. No OT in the shipyard except a small amount on the subs. Friday night and early Saturday morning the rain came down in buckets. I get a call from the Chipper boss that he would not be and to send his people home. He left the Job Orders on his desk. When I got to the Marine Rail and ready to send every home, the sun came out and started to dry up everything. I can not send anybody home with this weather. Gave out the jobs and said get to work. NO SHIPFITTERS SHOW UP. Welders were to remove hull frames. I got the JOPC and marked the removal areas. All good to go.
Monday morning I went in the Rail's shop to muster the gang. The chippers, welders and test gang where there in mass. They clapped and said thank s for not send the crew home on Saturday.
Short lived, one of the Fitters filed a grievance and wanted to get paid for us working his job. No one said anything to me during the day. About 2PM the Group Supt. comes to see me. Tell me the story about Saturday. How did you know what to do? I read the JOPC. "OK, but don't do it again". The Fitter did not get paid but he was allowed the first shot the next weekend

Friday, August 5, 2016

From: billy d
E-Mail: rigger072@yahoo.com
Shop: 072

hammerhead
The hardest part of the job of raising and lowering the antenna was climbing the stairs the elevator worked I think 1 time of the 10 times I was up there. And going through the pigeon shit was not to much fun ..but I was young and dumb then the climb will kill me today..lol but I will always remember the view.

Friday, August 5, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.begggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

Roger:

Vince Yancey became the first non woodworker to become the Superintendent woodworker in the history of 64 shop. It happened after I retired. I guess he managed as the Shop Supt. He had good supporting General Foremen.

Friday, August 5, 2016

From: Roger Nabors
E-Mail:
Shop: 99 shop

I remember someone telling me that in later years the pigeon crap had accumulated so much on the steps going up to the top of the hammer head crane that there were almost no space between the steps. I will always remember the first ship I worked on which was the Concord which was at pier 6 when I started October 19, 1978. My first supervisor was Vince Yancey insulater foremen.

Friday, August 5, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

A LARGE LIFT IS NEEDED

The shop was asked to provide staging on the hammer head 350 crane to repaint the red and white squares on the crane housing sides. We suggested hanging a painter's scaffold from clips welded on top of the crane. It was rejected. Staging built from the ground up was also rejected. A LARGE mobile crane was rented to hold a brow for the intrepid painters to repaint the crane's housing.

Friday, August 5, 2016

From: Roger Nabors
E-Mail:
Shop: 99 shop

A funny story: When I was in 56 shop as an insulator, One time while on 2nd shift we had a material shack just south of bldg. 620 between DD 4 & 5 where we would muster prior to the start of the shift. Well one summer afternoon a bad thunderstorm hit.There was lightning striking the top of the cranes and wind and rain.Our supervisor was Andy Curly aka: The " Whooper". He was quite a character. There were 2 DDG'S in DD5 we were working on. Well when the whistle blew at 3:30 Curly takes off for DD 5 thinking the whole gang was following along behind him like we did every day. We were not going to go out in that weather with all the lightning strikes se we stayed put. When he got to the brow and turned around and saw we are right where he left us we could see him gesturing with his hands and yelling and screaming but we couldn't hear what he was saying. We were all just watching him and cracking up. The storm passed and off we went to work but Curly had to wait for us.

Thursday, August 4, 2016

From: G EVANS
E-Mail: GEVANS0541054@VERIZON.NET
Shop: SHOP 26

HAMMERHEAD
After years of working the top of the crane with a safety harness, during the late 1970's the Safety Office say there needs to be a hand rail around the top. Maintenance ask for help. Little Steve a Ship fitter, and Gato the Welder did the job. Material hand carried up to the top. Welding leads and ground from the ground up. The safety harnesses were used.

Thursday, August 4, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

Billy, D

I remember that incident. We were lucky that the crane didn't fail while we had the tug hanging over that freighter. We would have put a big dent in it.

Wednesday, August 3, 2016

From: billy d
E-Mail: rigger072@yahoo.com
Shop: 072

Richard
I worked on that job as a apprentice boy.Bill Fallon was the lead rigger..it took 1/2 hour for the (2) 175 ton hooks to come down to the pier...but that might have been the last big lift the crane made. But if memory serves me right the same rigger Bill Fallon was using the crane to do lighter lifts on the Albany on east side of pier. He and the gang of riggers went to lunch and when they came back (1) of the main hooks came down by it self no operator or rigger was there. It landed on the deck of the Albany luckily no one was injured...I believe after that it deemed necessary to condemn the crane...but at one time I wasn't even born it was the largest crane in the country if not the world..

Tuesday, August 2, 2016

From: George Kepner
E-Mail: gek1986@yahoo.com
Shop: 62435-051

51 shop had to maintain air craft warning lights on top of the hammerhead crane . I used to like getting this job as it was very high and I got high pay for doing this . I would have done it without the extra money cause of the height . it was beautiful to look around . I could actually see the airplane tires smoke as they hit the runway and the pilots had the breaks on . from the top of the crane I could even see to people inside the plane , often wondered if they saw me ? I could also go to the river end of the cranes boom and see into new jersey just unforgettable moments .

Tuesday, August 2, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

The last big lift for the 350 crane at pier 4 was lifting a harbor tug from the river and placing it on the deck of a freighter for transport to Subic Bay. We had prefabed a cradle designed by the Design division, to be reassembled on the cargo hatch of the ship. The stowage had to be done in two shifts to meet the schedule of the freighter. The lift was completed and the tug fit into the cradle with the addition of a few wood shims. Our chief quarterman, former boatbuilder, came on board and inspected the completed job. He held his nose, and left. He had a unique way of motivating people.

Monday, August 1, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

A HIGHLAND BROGUE

We had one Scottish foreman whose brogue was so thick, it was very difficult to understand him. He would get very upset if asked to repeat his instructions. It usually took more than one man to decide what the foreman's assignment was. One day he gave me and my apprentice an assignment. I thought I heard destroyer and pier 2. My apprentice thought he heard center line and master gyro. We found two destroyers at pier 2 when we arrived there. We had no options. We went aboard both destroyers and established a center line in each master gyro compartment. It must have satisfied someone. We never heard any more about it.

Monday, August 1, 2016

From: G EVANS
E-Mail: GEVANS1054@VERIZON.NET
Shop: SHOP 26

About material showing up from no where. Once we got access to the Scrap Yard, The 4th Naval District Disposal Activity, Many missing items loss by the Shops were found. Disposal had a large Building in the back channel were they sold items to scrap dealers. The Unit issued list of thing that were available to buy. Shop 56 had 3 large values, one for each LSTs. They were signed for buy the shop's personnel. The one for the 1181 turned up missing. The values cost about $5000 each. After searching, rechecking paper work, out to the Scrap Yard we went. There on a pallet was the value. It was on sale to the highest bidder.

Sunday, July 31, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.begs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

Ron Miller:

We were the only shop that used hand saws, and were glad to have the saw filers right next to our building. There were two saw filers during the time you said your dad worked as one. An older gentleman and a younger guy. Both were easy to get along with. Our apprentices spent 4 weeks with them learning the basics of the work. They also fitted new handles to our hammers and mauls. When they retired, they were replaced by a younger guy who expected a tip for doing his job.

Sunday, July 31, 2016

From: Julio Casiano
E-Mail: Julio@Philly-Yardbird.com
Shop: 67964-026

'Pete the Cop' was my boss for awhile when I worked in the welding school.  Probably one of the best bosses I've had in any job during my working career.  He would always tell me to do what I thought was appropriate because he trusted my judgment.  Lots of bosses I've had would try and micro manage to justify their position.

I remember him telling me that he grew up an orphan in Girard College of Philadelphia.

I heard he drove a Jag, owned an airplane, and lived out in the 'Main Line' section and would take his bosses on plane rides over the Yard.  I don't know if the plane thing is true, of course.

Philly PD must pay pretty good.

Sunday, July 31, 2016

From: Ken Bradley
E-Mail: kbradley128@yahoo.com
Shop: 11 shop Code 106

RIP Pete Bachowsky. A fun guy to work with. Made the day entertaining.

Sunday, July 31, 2016

From: Ken Bradley
E-Mail: kbradley128@yahoo.com
Shop: 11 shop Code 106

Have not been on this website in awhile.
The conversation is great.

Ken

Sunday, July 31, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

A Roman general was quoted as saying "The best battle plan will fail with first contact with the enemy". It could also be said that the best plan could fail with first contact with reality. Our plastic shop was given an experimental job of making a glass reinforced glass antenna fairing. The finished fairing was not as smooth as desired. Our chief quarterman devised a method using a router to shave off the uneven surface of the fairing. The chief quarterman, a former boat builder, selected a veteran boat builder to operate the router. He didn't trust the plastic molders, some of which were shipwrights, which he held in low regard. The veteran boat builder's religion did not allow him to use artificial means, such as prescription glasses, to perform his duties. He had very poor vision. He adjusted the depth of the router bit a she made passes over the fairing. He made one adjustment too many, and cut the fairing in half, and ended the shop's antenna fairing experiment. The chief quarterman threw a fit and kicked his helmet out of the shop. The chief quarterman later became our shop superintendent, and was forced to rely on shipwrights on occasion. He later became our group superintendent. He thought dealing with was difficult until he met Tom Hare and his painters.

Sunday, July 31, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

TO HAVE AND HAVE NOT

Someone decided that having a kitty of surplus material was not a good thing. We had accumulated about 1000 monel bolts that were used to fasten the teak deck battens to the super structure of the subs. The kitty came in handy when the bolts ordered didn't arrive on time. The surplus bolts were stored in a old nail keg for 16 penny nails. The kitty was discovered, and the bolts were sent to the salvage yard. A shortage of the bolts developed about a year later. One day a nail keg arrived with about 1000 bolts. The old nail keg, labeled 16 penny nails sure looked familiar.

Saturday, July 30, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

When I was an apprentice in 1951, the blocks used in the dry docks were four feet high. It was a real challenge for anyone required to work under the ship, especially the painters, sand blasters, and the laborers removing the spent sand and shot. A few years later, an additional base block was used, raising the keel block height to six feet, six inches, and allowed anyone to walk under the ship without bending. Larger and larger sonar domes were being installed and were part of the ship below the keel. The height of the keel blocks followed. The new bow mounted sonar domes extended ten feet below the keel. The blocks now soared to fourteen feet to allow the installation of the new rubber window on the domes. It was unnerving to stand under a ship fourteen feet over your head. It also took a shoe horn to get these ships into a shallow dock like dry dock two. The dock setup had to be offset twelve feet east to allow the ship to pass up the west side of the dock, with the sonar dome between the dock wall and the bilge blocks of the setup, with a scant eight feet of clearance. It was real challenge to the riggers to keep the ship on its correct entry path. We never had an incident where they didn't complete the ship's transit into the dock on it's correct path. They never received the credit they deserved.

Saturday, July 30, 2016

From: Ron Miller
E-Mail: ronfish2002@yahoo.com
Shop: X31

Perhaps Messrs. Evans and Beggs crossed paths with my father, Ed Miller, 06 Shop, who worked at the Yard from the late "30's until 1971. He tried to enlist in the Navy in the '30's but was turned down because of bad teeth. (I don't think a visit to the dentist was high on the list for families during the Great Depression.) He started at the Yard as an oiler, tracing air lines down into the ships to squirt a few drops into various pneumatic tools. Next was tool repair, starting with replacing wooden hammer handles. Married with kids and a defense job, he was deferred from the draft when WWII broke out. The story goes that my mom talked him out of volunteering. I'm sure he took a lot of heat from returning vets afer the war. His next job for 06 was repairing manual typewriters in the '50's. Then stints in the grinding room, and then a tool room attendant. I remeber him mentioning knowing Swede Hansen. Several times he was detailed out to work on some kind of barge with a "donut" that was pumped full of oil.
I have no idea what that was. I remember he wasn't crazy about it. His last year or so he worked in 06 Shop as a saw filer, sharpening and setting teeth on all kinds of saws.
When I came home from Vietnam in '68, he suggested I apply for an apprenticeship at the Yard, but being a know-it-all in my 20's, I laughed him off. Twelve uears later, unemployed with no prospects, I was fortunate to enter the 31 Shop machinist apprenticeship through the VRA program. I guess the Shipyard was in my blood. My father never said "I told you so."

Saturday, July 30, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

The Brooklyn Navy Yard had an annex in Bayonne, New Jersey with a dry dock. The USS Franklin, the most damaged ship to survive the Kamikaze attacks at the battle for Okinawa, was in the dock. It was scheduled to be undocked and towed to a scrap yard. The Shipyard sent a team of shipwrights and riggers to Bayonne to undock the ship. We did not have any experience with the New York harbor pilot, or with his methods. We would normally ease the ship out of the dock with a outhaul line made up to a power capstan at a slow rate of speed. The harbor pilot backed a tug right up to the stern of the ship, made up his lines, and took off. The ship was out of the dock in minutes. Four tugs were waiting in the bay to turn the ship for the sea going tug to make up her lines for towing. We watched as the tug and ship passed under the Verrazano bride and out to sea. We had traveled to Bayonne by a yard bus. It was full dark when we started back to the yard. The bus was without lights. A Jersey state trooper pulled the bus over, and wouldn't let us continue until we had lights. A rigger jury rigged the failed light fuse and we had lights. We made it back to the shipyard without further incident. It was the last use of the Bayonne dry dock, by the navy.

Saturday, July 30, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

One ship I worked on never left the shipyard. It may still be there. It was the USS Buttercup. It was a hull section used at the damage control school near the west gate. It sat in it's own basin and had a hinge feature that allowed it to tilt to simulate a list when flooded during the training exercises. The damage control men were timed as they tried to stop leaks in the hull or burst pipes. If they failed, the hull section took a list until it rested on the supporting blocks in the basin. We were to replace the deteriorated blocks. Riggers used jacks to lift the hull section off of the blocks to allow us to replace them. There is a USS Buttercup at the damage control school at the Naval station in Norfolk, Va. I doubt if ours ever set sail.

Friday, July 29, 2016

From: G EVANS
E-Mail: GEVANS1054@VERIZON.NET
Shop: SHOP 26

During the 1960-70s there was a elaborate way of obtaining material for Federal workers to do their job. It was sad that people had to use it.
Material came from Federal Stock, items all activities used.
A large need, such as new construction, items were brought and placed in DMI, Direct material inventory.
PDM, Production Dept. Material, saved from completed work and difficult to obtain.
Supply's corner store, items used by the ship's personnel.
Shop Stores, commonly used item at the field level.
BPA, items needed on the job quickly.
Shop Kitty, Shop's hidden material.
The Gang's box.
The individual Toll Box.
All this made to get the work accomplished, by any method possible.

Wednesday, July 27, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

Any layout begins with a starting point. The layout for the docking blocks started with a reference point known as the "Stern Reference Point. It represents the extreme after end of the main deck, which is also used as a sighting point for positioning the ship in the dock during the docking operation. Its location is given as a distance from the head wall of the dock, or from the caisson sill, depending on how the ship is positioned in the dock. The layout was complete and all the blocks were in position. The layout man was on vacation when the General Foreman and Docking Officer were due to inspect the dock. A replacement layout man was sent to the dock to go the inspection process. He made a quick check and discovered that all the blocks were placed one foot further north than planned. He notified the Foreman that all 160 blocks would have to be moved one foot south of their current positons. The Foreman averted the massive job of moving all the blocks, by moving the Stern Reference Point, just a mark on the dock floor, one foot north. He also moved the topside reference point. The dock was inspected, and the ship was docked without incident. The replacement layout man was carefully observed in his own layout duties, and moreover, his reasoning thereafter.

Wednesday, July 27, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

THE COMPUTER RULES

A computer terminal was installed in our shop planner's office to enable them to track materials in the supply system purchased for a ship project. Disposable propane bottles and torches were ordered for a ship and did not arrive when scheduled, and were needed right now. The computer terminal indicted that there were none in the system. A shop planner searching for other material in building 83, noticed a pallet full of cases of propane bottles. He asked the supply guy what ship those bottles were for. The supply guy checked his computer printout, and said there are no propane bottles in the building. They agreed that there were no propane bottles on the printout, but couldn't agree that there were none in the building. The shop sent a planner and truck uptown to Sears and bought enough propane bottles to finish the job. The ship left and a week later the computer terminal in the shop planner's office listed the propane bottles arrival in building 83. They were delivered to the shop a few days later.

Tuesday, July 26, 2016

From: G EVANS
E-Mail: GEVANS1054@VRIZON.NET
Shop: SHOP 26

With the recent heat wave, it brings back the summer under the flight deck of the LPH-3. Shop 99 placed large air movers at every opening possible. Shop 71 painted the flight deck white. The safety office check the temperature during day. Many days it reached 120 degrees. Guys would take their shirt and pants off to dry them front of the air movers. The white paint washed off during the first rain.

Sunday, July 24, 2016

From: John Stangler 57760 026
E-Mail: Jcstangler@aol.com
Shop: 26

R I P Pete!

Friday, July 22, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

THE FOURTH STEP

A journeyman's pay level was based on tine in grade. There were three steps. Each step required time spent in that level. Almost all the journeymen had reached the third step. A fourth step was introduced to compensate those men who had added responsibilities, like layout work. Not everyone receiving the fourth step deserved it It created more disharmony than what it was worth. It was soon phased out.

Friday, July 22, 2016

From: RIchard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

During the dark ages of the early 50's forced leave was the common practice when operations were suspended due to inclement weather. Working aloft was considered unsafe when it was raining, snowing or blowing. We accepted the forced leave as though it was a proper thing. Employees in the shipyard usually had relatives or friends working in other shops. One whispered in our ear that we were being taken advantage of. Once a man clocks in, we were told, work must be provided. We tested this the next time we were ordered to take forced leave. We want another job, we declared. The foreman was taken aback. It had never happened before. He passed our protest up the line. Someone decided in our favor. We were given other work, and forced leave for inclement weather faded away. Forced leave came back, however, later. Fifteen men each week were forced onto annual leave to prevent a RIF, This lasted for about a month. The men affected were all long time employees with a lot of accrued leave. The newer employees, or men with little leave, were not involved. This too was found to be improper. Furloughs, in accordance with retention registers were the proper actions. Temporary employees. who required no advance notice, were subjected to a RIF. Furloughs were never attempted.

Friday, July 22, 2016

From: Tom queenan
E-Mail: Tmquee@verizon.net
Shop: 26/231

Mr. Evans,
I started in 26 shop in early 1978. Foreman's assistants at that time were referred to , as "pushers". Maybe at one time this was an actual payed position,but when I got hired there was always a welder that hung out with the foreman,assigning jobs,giving worksite updates and doing time sheets and such. We called them pushers and some other choice names,due to the fact that they never put on a shield. I know there names,but will not divulge them at this time. Many a weldor "discussed" these guys,with much disdain and animosity. When you crawled into a tight spot,in the heat of the summer ,sweating and getting burnt,and you walk into the foremans office and saw these "pushers" with their feet up on the desk ,not breaking a sweat,it left quite a memory to say the least. This practice remained until I left the tools in 1989.

Friday, July 22, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

HOLD EM OR FOLD EM

During the construction of the first LPH, 64 shop had a sawmill/office located south of 620 bldg. One of our literate foreman attempted to motivate the shipwrights working in dry dock four on the construction. He posted a sign that read "eight for eight or out the gate" The foreman and three other foreman played pinochle at lunch time each day, for cash. One of the shipwright scribes posted a sign next to the poet's that read "gambling within the shipyard is prohibited". Both signs disappeared. The lunch time pinochle game continued without cash trading hands. Everyone continued giving eight for eight. And the band played on.

Friday, July 22, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: Rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

A new diesel electric submarine of the Barbel class built at New York Ship was scheduled to be docked in dry dock two around 1956/57. It was the Bonefish. Temporary sliding bilge blocks were installed in the dock because the necessary docking information was not available. The pilot and his tugs were having a hard time getting the sub away from the pier, and this should have been noticed. The sliding bilge blocks were hauled in by chains, through a sheave, and tied off topside. I was stationed at the first bilge block haul in chain. As the sub passed into the dock, the haul in chain parted, and then the next two. The temporary bilge block slides began floating in the dock. The sub was taken back to the pier. Divers discovered that the keel mounted anchor was not housed. It was hanging ten feet below the keel, even though its indicator showed it to be housed. The dock was pumped dry, the temporary bilge block slides reinstalled, the anchor properly housed, and the sub was docked without further incident. This all happened on a weekend. The sub was renamed "The Moneyfish".

Thursday, July 21, 2016

From: G EVANS
E-Mail: GEVANS1054@VERIZON.NET
Shop: SHOP 26

Tom Q, Shop 26 used Pushers into the mid 1950s. They were called Instructors. GFs had in their gang people who helped the Foreman when needed. They were paid five or six cents an hour more. Ruling came out that had to be charged to an overhead account they were reduced in numbers to three. The Supervisors still used the people and compensated the person with a special pay rate. (Hot, Dirty, Enclosed space, Pipe, JP-5 storage etc.) When they could match the extra pay with Job Order this stopped also. They became KEY MEN.

Tuesday, July 19, 2016

From: Dennis Kaiser
E-Mail: dennis_kaiser@outlook.com
Shop: Code 911

For the OBIT Section:

PETER D.BACHOWSKY A.K.A. "Pete The Cop"
Former Shop 26 Foreman and resident of Swarthmore died July 17, 2016. Survived by his wife Joan (nee Reeder) Bachowsky, daughter Jennifer (Michael) Wean, grand-children Madison and Alexander Wean and sister in law Barbara Reeder. Relatives and friends are invited to his Funeral Mass on Monday at 10:00 A.M. at St. Rose of Lima Church, 1901 Chester Pike, Eddystone, PA 19022. Friends may call 9 to 9:45 A.M. at the church. Int. Lawn Croft Cemetery. Contri-butions to Crozer Keystone Hospice Inpatient Residence 175 East Chester Pike, Ridley Park, PA 19078 are appreciated.

Friday, July 15, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

Tom:

Two of the shipwrights who fell that day worked for me at one time. Both bright young guys who were trained to work aloft, and knew the precautions required. I was surprised to hear you say that they didn't have safety belts on. The young man that later died of his injuries was Steve Bazylewicz. His father was a shipyard cop. I saw an article later about his widow, and the hardships she experienced while Steve was in the hospital with an induced coma. I believe she and the other men had sued the bubble company for damages. I don't know what ever became of the lawsuit.

Friday, July 15, 2016

From: Julio Casiano
E-Mail: Julio@Philly-Yardbird.com
Shop: 67964-026

I only worked a the 'Yard for twelve years (1981-1993), but I remember we had what they called 'Stand Up Safety Meetings' at muster once a week. I always thought they were called 'Stand Up Safety Meetings' because we weren't sitting down during muster.
I remember the 'Bubble' incident and I think that's when I started realizing what 'Stand Down Safety Meetings' were all about.

Friday, July 15, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

ALL THE KINGS MEN

Tom: Pushers were probably needed during the Second World War when foremen were overwhelmed by the number of employees they had to supervise. The pushers were phased out in our shop except for one Foreman who still used four. They assigned and monitored work, collected and distributed time cards, and took care of administrative work normally done by a Foreman. The foreman was like an absentee landlord, elusive and rarely seen. He managed to be on the first ferry to New Jersey every night. His reign ended when he, a non vet, was displaced by a RIF. His pushers, elected to retire , rather than go back to their tools. They were never replaced.

Thursday, July 14, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

Roger: I wasn't there, and don't know who ordered them.

Thursday, July 14, 2016

From: Tom queenan
E-Mail: Tmquee@verizon.net
Shop: 26/231

Concerning the shipwrights who fell through the "bubble" as it was affectionally referred to.
The event occurred a day or two after the July 4 th holiday. This was the second time that this enclosure was used. The first was on the Lexington. After that the bubble was disassembled and stored haphazardly. I believe that it was layed out in dry dock four awaiting the Independence .Once in was erected on the Independance ,it was never installed with the same tautness as originally designed ,hence,when it rained,the water would pool in the pockets between the frames. Large pools of water. Various methods of removing the water were tried. Dropping suction hoses into the pools of water, putting pallets on high reaches in order to push the water from below,etc. I know this because I was assigned to the flight deck welding crew,working for Juan Valentine. We mustered every day under that bubble. This particular day the ship Supt. ( Navy) was very animated and job one was to get that water off of there. After all we had a heavy rain ,over a holiday and the manpower to stay on top of this was not available.
It looked like there was five huge swimming pools hanging above our heads. Now these shipwrights were very familiar with working up there. Maybe in hindsight,too familiar.They were moving suction hoses from pocket to pocket . Maybe something was on their workshoes but I know that they were not tethered. I remember seeing them from below walking on the bubble surface on a daily basis. Never thought anything about it.
Well the combination of worn out material, shoddy assembly of the structure and no safety harnesses,proved to be a deadly combination. We were fifteen minutes into our mustering,and all the pockets gave way ,one by one. We all took off momentarily,until everyone realized that there was workers who fell with the pools of water. They fell to the flight deck and into the vacated catapults. The bubble remained ripped fo sometime afterwards.it was a reminder of how dangerous the shipyard could be.it was something that could have been avoided,but familiarity breeds casualness. What a shame.

Thursday, July 14, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

A FINGER IN THE DIKE

Dry dock four's caisson was scheduled to be overhauled at Sun Ship in Chester. The pumps and hydraulic gates in the pump well were also undergoing repairs. The work would have to stop once the dock was flooded. The docking officer asked if we could install a blank over the induction tunnel in the dock. We built a large wooden cofferdam to SEAL OFF THE TUNNEL. We installed it, and the dock was flooded. The pump well was inspected and found that there were no leaks. The caisson was removed and taken to Sun Ship. The docking officer left, I retired, and the cofferdam remained in place. At some point, someone decided to test the pumps. The added suction proved too much for the cofferdam. It was sucked into the pump well, along with the Delaware river. This partially flooded dry dock five, before the pumps could be shut down. The docking officer had not left any info about a cofferdam being in place. I was called back to the shipyard to explain the shop's role in the incident by NCIS. The only evidence was a letter of commendation written by the docking officer citing our help in installing the cofferdam, that was kept by one of the recipients. No fault was assigned, and the investigation was closed,

Thursday, July 14, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

Jerry:

One other place that a canvas cover played an important role was at pier four, where a Slep carrier was berthed after leaving Dry Dock Five. The docking officer gave us the layout of the pier, stressing the importance of locating the quarter deck between the base of the 350 crane and a transformer enclosure. We laid out the pier to accomplish this. All went well. The ship was berthed on the north side of the pier, and the brow at the quarter deck landed. Waiting in the wings, so to speak, was the Shipyard flock of pigeons. They were indiscriminate of where and when they void their bowels. It didn't take long before the officers using the brow were the victims of this. We installed a canvas cover over the brow to protect those using it from the pigeon droppings.

Thursday, July 14, 2016

From: Roger nabors
E-Mail:
Shop: 56 99 SHOP

I remember those shipwrights falling through the flight deck bubble. I believe it was on the Independence and I recall those poor guys were sent up there as per orders from the 64 shop supt. Bill Ott

Thursday, July 14, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

COME RAIN OR COME SHINE

I can remember just one occasion when the Shipyard suspended operations and sent everyone, except essential people, home at noon. It was an unexpected snow storm. There was about 4 inches on the ground by 1000, and it was really snowing. The storm coincided with a scheduled sub docking on the railway at 1300. No docking, to my knowledge, was ever postponed because of the weather. The docking went on as planned. The father of one of the apprentices in the docking party arrived at the railway, and asked that his son be excused, so he take him home. It was denied, but he was invited to stay with us for the hour or so it would take to get the sub up on the railway. He accepted, the sub was docked, and father and son left before 1400.

Wednesday, July 13, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

Jerry:
You failed to mention two places where canvas was used for weather protection. The subs at pier D were cover with a canvas cover from the aft end of the sail, to the after escape hatch. It was supported with aluminum bows attached to the hand rail stanchions of the figure 4 hull staging. Another place was the flight deck of the Slep carriers. A large steel frame work was erected and canvas stretched from it to protect the flight deck and catapults from the weather. A tragic accident occurred on one carrier when three Shipwrights, attempting to siphon water from a large depression in the canvas, fell to the flight deck 50 feet below. Two were permanently disabled, and the third died months later.

Tuesday, July 12, 2016

From: billy d
E-Mail: rigger072@yahoo.com
Shop: 072

Richard keep writing I especially enjoy the docking stories and the docking officers...they were mostly 1st week students next week teachers..lol

Tuesday, July 12, 2016

From: G EVANS
E-Mail: GEVANS1054@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 26 SHOP

I don't why Hillary Clinton did not know what the "C" meant on her emails. It meant "CANVIS".
During my years at PNSY I ran across a number of classified jobs that were covered in canvas. The first was the training enclosure for welders who would work the XMAP. The XMAP it self, in DD4. The entire assembly was covered, stem to stern. The plating was manufacture at Midvale Steel Phila., shipped into the Yard in the dead of the night covered in canvas.
The Boston and Canberra outfitted with the first onboard missiles, guarded with Marines and covered with Canvas.
At the end of Mifflin Field, the Air Engineering needed a JP5 storage tank built for testing of JP5 formulations. Covered in canvas. Across the road was the Sea Plane catapult system, had to cover with canvas when not working.
All the props were covered in canvas when on the move within the shipyard and out.
Went to the Naval Divers School, Washington Navy Yard, DC. To keep the students from seeing what was going on, they built a canvas tunnel for the sailors to walk through.
Bldg. 541 "C" bay, built a missile handling system mock up for the TALOS, USS Galveston, covered with canvas. NOT MANY REMAINED CLASSIFIED TILL THE END OF THE JOB.

Monday, July 11, 2016

From: Tom queenan
E-Mail: Tmquee@verzon.net
Shop: 26 /231

Another "snake" Silvestri story.
My first ship to work on was the USS Belknap. It was in dry dock 4 , with no superstructure. Almost three years later,it was being turned over to the navy.
I worked on her until It left the yard. One of the many jobs I was associated with was ensuring that all of the areas that were difficult to get to were welded. Most were associated with compartments and there penetrations. We would go inside the compartment and pressurized air would be introduced( about 2 psi) and we would hold a candle to the seams and penetrations. Wherever the flame would lean , gave us a good indication of where the pinholes were. Most were in very inaccessible areas,hence ,very sloppy welding,to say the least.Back then ,we had pushers,sort of supervisors without the authority. This particular pusher ensured that he would mark all of the "leaks" . Well his enthusiasm ,made my day very rough to say the least.
One day I checked the compartment and noticed more chalk markings,denoting leaks, than at any other time. The pusher sure did his job. Going to muster for the days assignment,I expected the worse. The pusher gladly offered his expertise and findings to f/l Silvestri,thinking his job was done. The " Snake" said to the pusher,"... Well now you know where the leaks are at ,grab your shield and go weld em up." The pusher stayed in that compartment for over a week,never offering his enthusiasm so freely ever again. The " Snake" was the best. More stories to follow

Monday, July 11, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

AN INCLINATION OF TROUBLE

Design division performed tests on ships, and submarines, to gauge their stability, and ability to recover from a sudden list. Large weights are landed on the main deck, midships at the extreme beam of the ship. A list is induced, the weight lifted, and the amount of time it takes for the ship to recover from the list is noted. Different methods had to be used on submarines because of the limited deck space available. The deck on a submarine is about 12 feet wide and offered little rom for landing a weight to induce the list. A set of timbers with railroad tracks attached about 20 feet long was secured to the deck. The outboard ends were supported with shores down to the hull. A cart rode on the tracks with a weight on it. It was controlled by a cable and a set of pulleys to move it. It looked ,to me, like an accident ready to happen. Don't worry, I was told, this has been done before without incident. The weight was placed on the cart. The cart moved to the extreme end of the track. The sub took a list. The cable parted and the cart and weight went overboard. The timber and track arrangement were still secured to the deck. Divers recovered the cart and weight. A new cable was installed, and act two performed without incident. The inclining experiments were performed on the subs many times without incident. Like Elvis, I left the building. I was transferred to new construction.

Sunday, July 10, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.begs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

A DOCTOR'S APPOINTMENT?

Inventive and sometimes devious men will find a way to achieve their goals. I was working on the Dahlgren under construction in Dry Dock four, building a ramp under the stern, from the main strut to the stern tube, for the installation of the propeller shafts. There were just two of us at the time, the other man was on vacation. My partner asked our Foreman at quitting time, if he could have a half day off the nest day. The answer was no, he couldn't be spared. The next day the man presented a leave slip requesting four hours of sick leave to see a Doctor Flagler at 1300. The foreman had no recourse. he granted the leave. If the foreman had been a racing fan, he would have discovered that Doctor Flagler won the third race at Garden State race track on the day of the man's leave request.

Saturday, July 9, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

WATER SEEKS ITS OWN LEVEL

There are Navy specifications for different operations. The practices, procedures, protocols and designated responsibilities and duties are clearly listed. A Navy Officer is assigned the responsibility and duty to oversee the docking/undocking of ships in Naval Shipyard. They are all engineers and capable men. Some more than others. One, I recall displayed a condescending view of the civilians assigned to assist him in his duties. It did not go unnoticed. Each dry dock had it's own factors to be considered. Dry dock two at one time had sliding bilge block slides that were three feet above the dock floor. The state of the art in docking procedures eliminated their need. They were removed along with the center line concrete platform. This improved the dock, giving it a greater depth of three feet. The dock draft figure were changed to reflect the dock's new depth. The draft figures on the river side of the quay wall weren't changed. We always informed the current docking officer of the correction needed in reading these draft figures to determine the height of the water in the dock in relation to the height of the water in the river. The heights had to be equal in order to remove the water pressure of the river against the caisson before the caisson's ballast tanks were started to be pumped out. If the pumping started too early the buoyancy of the caisson at one point would overcome the pressure exerted by the river draft and the caisson would pop up and a mini tsunami would enter the dock. It had never happened, until one undocking. The docking officer ordered the pumping of the ballast tanks of the caisson, either to further the schedule or he had misread the draft figures. The caisson popped up three feet before the dock draft equaled the river draft. The riggers on the caisson got a little thrill and the already floating ship in the dock suddenly rose three feet. No one seem to notice except the riggers on the caisson, the docking officer and myself. This particular docking officer always wrote a critique, usually citing the poor performance of the docking party, after each docking or undocking. There was no critique this time.

Saturday, July 9, 2016

From: GEVANS
E-Mail: GEVANS1054@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 26 SHOP

Tom Queenan. I first met Silvestri when we were assigned to the XMAP. We worked for the Project Manager, a former 26 GF who was a non-vet and was lay off. Along with Buddy Benson Pop Cloud called us Henny Benny and the Kid.
Next meeting was at Pier 4. Hendry said lets go to lunch at the main cafeteria early. He took me through the pipe shop, into 650 bldg., out into an ally way, into kitchen and out to the side of the cafeteria ready to be 1st in line. It was also near the Supt's Lunch room. TO Maginnis came out of the door, Hey Welders ,Henry shouted RUN.

Saturday, July 9, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

WHATS PAST IS PROLOGUE

The most embarrassing position any supervisor faces is when he is reminded of his less than satisfactory performance when he was a journeyman. During one Monday morning safety meeting at Pier D, the Chief Quarterman Shipwright, who was attending, was addressing what he believed to be a lack of commitment to a full days work by the employees there. An older Scot replied "I can remember when the only thing you carried in your tool bag was a checker board and checkers". I wont dignify that remark with an answer, the Chief replied. This meeting is over. The older Scot was later transferred from the relative light work at Pier D to more strenuous work on the waterfront. He retired shortly thereafter. The Chief Quarterman enjoyed many more years in his position. I don't know if he gave any more motivation talks. He was appointed to be the first civilian Ship Supt (red hat) for a short time until the experiment ended. He retired during "The Great Escape" the early out of 1972.

Friday, July 8, 2016

From: Tom queenan
E-Mail: Tmquee@verizon.net
Shop: 26/231

One of the many stories told to me by my first supervisor,Hank" snake" Silvestri 26 shop.
Upon making supervisor for the first time, his gf( Bucky Quinn) grabbed a hold of the new supervisor and ordered him to follow him. Off the ship he goes and down the pier.
Working their way through bldg 541 (?) they both climb the steps to the upper regions of the bldg. Snake said he never knew this area ever existed. Bucky goes up and opens the door,and catches some tired shipyard workers. Right em up,was the order of the day. Being a new supervisor his back was against the wall. Right em up he did.
Later he asked Bucky how he knew that workers would be sleeping up there.
Bucky said, " ....that's where I used to sleep"
Don't know if it's true or not,but it was a good story and was a great introduction to the shipyard

Friday, July 8, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

NICHT WAHR

Schadenfreude is a German noun with no counterpart in the English language. It means "pleasure derived by someone from another person's misfortune. Its like those who smile at seeing someone getting a traffic ticket, or rubber necking at an accident scene. These people are everywhere, and sometimes in positions of authority. I sat in for our shop Supt at the review of the weekly status report, usually called the "Rat Sheet". Each shop Supt received one to update any information concerning his shop. The Group Supt was grilling the Painter Supt about the number of compressed air flasks being blasted and painted. The numbers on the Painter Supt's rat sheet didn't agree with his information, and he was getting upset trying to reconcile the numbers. The Group Supt was smiling and winking at the other Supts at the table. It was apparent that the Painter Supt was given last weeks rat sheet. I handed my current rat sheet to the Painter Supt, and he realized what had happened. I had spoiled the Group Supt's little schadenfreude attempt at humor. Humor is an essential part of everyone's character, except when you are the butt of it. I never sat in for our shop Supt again at one of the weekly status reviews.

Friday, July 8, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

A DISAPPEARING ACT

We had assembled the parts required for the stowage of two boats, a whale boat and captain's jig, and shipped them to 31 shop for combing the threaded ends of the parts. They were to be delivered back to our shop when completed. Two weeks went by and the parts never arrived. Two shipwrights were sent to 31 shop to help search for the parts. They weren't found. Even the fabled chief quarterman machinist and future Services Group Supt could explain their loss. New parts were made and taken to 31 shop. This time a shipwright went along, and followed the parts through each step of the process. Our shop truck brought the parts back to the shop when they were completed. Two years later, the original parts were delivered to our shop, without explanation. It was like an episode of the Twilight Zone.

Thursday, July 7, 2016

From: Big Mike Bower
E-Mail: bruddaboo71@msn.com
Shop: 26 Shop

Tom, I got the same email requesting info. I did not respond.

Thursday, July 7, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

WHEN IN DOUBT - PUNT

I was nowhere as knowledgeable or able as Jerry Evans was in his budget requests at the budget hearing he described. Our shop Supt was scheduled to give his "State Of The Shop" address. He was on vacation when the event was rescheduled for today. His temporary replacement was sent home sick that morning. A third stringer was needed to be the sacrificial goat. My favorite Group Supt summoned me. I was given a 30 minute crash course in what I was expected to present as the current "State Of The Shop". In the Production Officer's office, I made a rambling, almost incoherent, presentation out lining the shop's success in meeting it demographic and EEO goals, the shops commitment to the mission of the shipyard, and the current satisfactory schedule adherence on all the ship projects, and the fact that the shop had the lowest man day rate in the Shipyard. Are there any questions, I asked. The production officer said "no, you did good". I doubt if the group supt agreed. We all knew that I was full of it. There were many budget and State Of The Shop events later. I was never asked to attend one.

Wednesday, July 6, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: ricch.beggs @verizon.net
Shop: 064

WIRE REELS

Dan: We used wire reel also. It was a practical way to establish a straight line over a long distance. The only problem was everyone and their brother tripped over it. Then a young guy came onboard with a transit, and the wire reels were retired.

Wednesday, July 6, 2016

From: Ron Reeves "Garbage Man"
E-Mail: pnsy17shop@comcast.net
Shop: 17

To Jim Yunker per your email of 5 March. Bill Anast, from LBNS was the Eagle on the Belknap. One day as I was working in the passageway on the main deck, along he strolls not looking where he was going, and 'crash' he hit his head on a beam knocking his hardhat off and leaving him bleeding and dazed. The Medics came and escorted him off walking wounded with blood streaming down his face and shirt. No one liked him.... To Danny O'Kane re: Email of 25 February. The names of the two DD's that went to Iran were the Zellars (DD 777) Babr & Stormes (DD 780) Palang. I am now a Head Researcher for www.navsource.org I remember the turnovers quite well, I went to the ceremonies,in fact I attended every ceremony the 'yard had since the 60's. Hello to all my shipmates......

Wednesday, July 6, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

A NEAR MISS

The battleship Iowa was scheduled to be docked in dry dock 4 for blasting and painting, and to remove the blanks from her sea chests, prior to being towed to a private yard for overhaul and re commissioning. Battleships and carriers pose a problem to the shipyard pilot. The ship must be turned across the river channel to properly align it with the dock entrance. This can only be done when there is little or no tidal current at the peak of high tide. The entire docking evolution is timed by this moment. If the schedule was followed we would have two feet of clearance over the blocks .The pilot had the ship ready to turn across the channel when a outbound freighter appeared in the channel. The pilot paused turning the ship, and let the freighter pass down river. We had just lost an hour and a foot of water and clearance. We would lose another foot of water in the hour it would take for the pilot to get the ship to the dock, and zero clearance. I advised the docking officer that we should abort the docking. We are committed now, he said. No, I thought, YOU are committed, and it will be to a room without a view if you ground this ship before it is safely over the blocks. The ship was now half way into the dock and the sea chest blanks were skimming the top layer of soft wood off of the keel blocks, which could be seen floating in the dock. The riggers did an amazing job getting the centering lines to the power capstans, but there was little time left to try to center the ship over the blocks, when the outgoing tide landed the ship. The shipwright at the bow sight reported that the ship landed on center. We had to wait for the caisson to be seated before we could get a stern sight. The stern also landed on center. it was a minor miracle. When we inspected the dock we found about 12 keel blocks displaced, and a some missing soft wood caps. It seemed to be just another routine docking to the docking officer. In reality, it was the closest thing to a grounding of a ship in dry dock that I was aware of. The docking officer left when his tour of duty ended. In 1996 TWA flight 800 crashed off of Long Island Sound. The navy sent a salvage ship to assist in recovering plane parts and the bodies of the victims. Our former docking officer, now a captain, was in charge of the navy's part of the salvage operations. On national television he gave credence to the unfounded rumor that a terrorist missile may have caused the crash. He was never interviewed again.

Wednesday, July 6, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

Tom: Thanks for the good advice.

Wednesday, July 6, 2016

From: Tom queenan
E-Mail: Tmquee@verizon .net
Shop: 26/231

Julio and others,
We post our experiences and e mails pretty freely. I hope it continues.
I have received e mails purportedly from some law firm,asking for info that pertains to some of our history,but just enough to raise my suspicions. Just would like to emphasize do not give any history to unknown sources. Law firms titles may make it look official, but asking for clients info from the 1940's is a bit much. Please be careful what you share,especially " from historians and those who are working on their behalf.

Tuesday, July 5, 2016

From: Kevin Philpott
E-Mail: kpkevinphil@gmail.com
Shop: 38 shop

One day I was in early, before 6:30 am. While standing outside the GFs'
office, I heard "Mr Hermans'" office door open. I looked down and saw "Mr.Herman" come out of his office and step on the weight scale to weight himself. After he noted the weight registered, he proceeded to remove his wallet and re-weigh himself. He picked up his wallet and returned to his office.

Monday, July 4, 2016

From: Danny O'Kane
E-Mail: dannyboydpo@rcn.com
Shop: 11 Shop

Rich , Here's one for you . I had only been at the yard for four months and was working out in Erie Bay ,alongside 541 bldg. We were building a ' jig ' for new construction . It was about five foot off the ground and about 400 foot square . It had to be perfectly level . My mechanic sent me over to the tool room in 57 bldg. to get a spool of ' piano wire ' Tool room guy tells me he doesn't have " no stinking piano wire " Back I go and tell my mechanic , Arron Bolot , they don't have any "piano wire " . The veins were starting to show on his head . Grabs me and off we go back to 57 bldg. tool room . Now picture this ,,, the ' window ' of the tool room was maybe two foot square . Arron says to the attendant , did my man ask you for a spool of ' piano wire ' ?? The guy says to Arron , that's not what it is called . With this said , Arron reaches thru the little window , grabs the guy by the shirt , half drags him thru the window and I thought the guy was going to mess his pants! With this out of the way , the guy hands Arron not one but two spools of , here it comes ,,"alignment wire " . No charge !!
I learned a lot about how the shipyard works from this little guy , Arron . More about him in another posting .
Gotta' love 'em !!

Monday, July 4, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

BE CAREFUL WHAT YOU ASK FOR - YOU MAY NOT LIKE IT WHEN YOU GET IT

The second shift in most shops received their instructions via a form describing the work to be done. It was called a night letter in our shop. I was a foreman on the second shift, reluctantly, for about six months and was anxious to return to the first shift. On what was to be my last night on the shift, I received a night letter that told me to send one man down to a ship on pier five, and to meet the General Foreman in the medical department for instructions for the work to be done. After assigning the rest of the second shift, I went down to the ship to see what the assignment was. I met the General Foreman on the pier, and asked him what the assignment was. I already told your man what to do , he said, and hurried off the pier. I found the man who had received the instructions in the doctor's office. The man told me they were to tile this office, and the adjourning suite of offices. It seemed reasonable since the decks were prepared for tile, and all the material was in the space. I thought this was too much for two men to do. I returned to the shop and called the General Foreman at home to verify what the man had told me. I couldn't reach him. I took four men off of another job and added them to the tile job. I revisited the ship at lunch time to find the man who had received the original instructions in the dentist's chair with a doctor working on his teeth. It was lunch time, but I thought it odd that the dentist was treating this man. It was unlikely that this job would finish on this shift. I notified the 970 rep for the second shift and explained the situation. He said the ship was leaving the next day. He called the duty officer and received permission for overtime to finish the job. Eight men and myself stayed through and finished the job by 0700. The doctors were very happy. Maybe too happy, I thought. When we returned to the shop and the General Foreman found out the amount of work that we had done, he went ballistic. The job was for one office, he said. It was his fault, I told him for not trusting me with the job information. The end result was extensive free dental work for one man, and the removal of a dimwit foreman from the second shift. I accepted the change of shift, reluctantly, but with a smile.

Wednesday, July 6, 2016

From: G EVANS
E-Mail: GEVANS1054@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 26SHOP

MY FINEST HOUR.
When I was Apprentice Instructor, I became involved with Training and Testing of welders, the shop's equipment, supplies and most things necessary to put a welder on the job. As GP the Shop Head ask me to work with the same programs. I attended a number of PO's budget hearings.
When SLEP was assigned to PNSY, the PO called for a budget hearing for the Saratoga. My Shop Head told me to get ready, pump all the numbers. I was ready the POs usually cut what you ask for. I said we need 20 new apprentices, may be cut to 15 or 16. Needed 100K in material and equipment, always cut.
The PO ask a lot of questions about cost, material/equipment, and time lines for this to happen.
Surprise, Surprise, he had different ideas. Lets talk SLEP. The monies are here now it may disappear latter.
Left the hearing with 94 apprentices(92 finished), and with 1 million dollars to use. Good days work?

Tuesday, July 5, 2016

From: G EVANS
E-Mail: GEVANS1054@VERIZON.COM
Shop: 26

Dennis, I have only one story about Al Herman 38 Supt. I was sent to see Al about being deficient in reporting information to the Production Office/NAVSEA. I got to his office about 12.00 after lunch. As I about knock on Al's office door a GF came running up to me and said don't do that. "We are not to wake him up until 1230".
Never did get that report.

Tuesday, July 5, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

DON'T RAIN ON MY PARADE

A weather related problem occurred during the docking of the carrier Roosevelt in dry dock five. A sudden thunder storm with high winds and heavy rain happened just as the ship was to land on the blocks. The riggers manning the power capstans ran for cover, leaving the centering lines at the stern to lose tension on the capstan drum, and slipped causing the ship to drift about 18 inches of center. The ship had a flat bottom and the misalignment wasn't a real problem. I recommended that we refloat the ship and land it on center. The docking officer didn't agree. He was satisfied that the ship was safely on the blocks. A real catastrophe would have occurred, however, if the ship had been a destroyer. It may well have capsized. I recommended to the large General Foreman rigger that perhaps more weather resistant riggers man the power capstans in the future. He, himself, was not on scene when the incident happened. We were lucky, we never had another storm during a docking.

Monday, July 4, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

DECISION MAKING BY THE NUMBERS

The Shipyard hired a company from Princeton, NJ. named Kepner Tregoe to train managers in their patented decision making process. I attended a week long training session. Their process involved a careful analysis of a problem, and a step by step consideration of each possible solution and its ramifications. This may have worked at NASA where projects were planned ten years in advance. Solutions to problems faced by Supervisors hourly or daily, were solved hourly or daily, using common sense and experience. Some of those solutions, in hindsight, could have been better. We were asked to relate an actual situation where the Kepner Tregoe process might have offered a better solution than the one actually taken. In 1975, I told the panel selected to consider my example, the Shipyard experienced one of the coldest winter in a long time. The Delaware river froze shore to shore. Dry dock four, noted for it cracked floor and underground springs was covered with about four inches of ice over 75% of the dock floor. A docking was scheduled but we could not begin the layout of the blocks because of the ice. The panel considered the problem and possible solutions using the Kepner Tregoe method. They recommended: 1. Wait for warmer weather, safest but out of the question due to the dock schedule. 2. Steam under tarps. It was slow but wouldn't harm the dock concrete floor. 3. Rock salt and chemicals. Also slow and possible damage to the concrete. 4. Jack hammers and scrappers. Faster, but possible damage to the concrete. 5. Bull dozers. Fastest, but definitely harmful to the concrete. The panel recommended the first three methods. three of four methods were actually used until they proved too slow. 07 shop brought in the bull dozers, and the rest is history. The entire dock floor had to be replaced later with a 24 hour concrete pour covering 150,000 square feet of the dock floor. The representatives from Kepner Tregoe realized that schedule would trump any rational decision making process. I don't kno!
w if the Kepner Tregoe process was ever used in the Shipyard to solve a problem.. Decisions continued to be made hourly and daily by supervisor using common sense and experience. Kepner Tregoe faded into the sunset.

Monday, July 4, 2016

From: Dennis Kaiser
E-Mail: dennis_kaiser@outlook.com
Shop: Code 911

“Big Brother Is Watching”
It was in 1976 while I was a Journeyman ShipFitter and working on the USS Vreeland (FF-1068). I was given the job as lead Mechanic installing the New L.A.M.P.S. Telescoping Hanger. The hanger was manufactured by a Canadian company and we were ready to install the hanger on the tracks that I had installed when the contractor rep noticed that a drive shaft was missing. He asked me for my home address and told me he would ship it to my home. I started to balk but he said that if he shipped it to the Navy Yard, it would never be seen or heard from again… A testament to the Supply Department (Sorry Dick Becker)
In about a week the part came to my apartment, I brought it in to work and had 38 Shop install it. The next day I was being intervened by an FBI agent and my Foreman, wanting to know why, defense Department contracted material was being shipped to my home.
I explained and the agent and my Foreman were satisfied with the explanation. My Foreman was apparently impressed, because he never forgot what I did and every time I was promoted after that he would tell the story.
I always wondered how the FBI knew the drive shaft was DOD material, I guess “Big Brother” is always watching, in this case I think it was a good thing. I was just trying to get a job done.

Monday, July 4, 2016

From: George Kepner
E-Mail: gek1986@yahoo.com
Shop: 62435 051

i want to also thank everyone posting storing about the shipyard . they bring back memories . yes 31 shop wouldn't check out their tools to anyone other than their personnel . i used to work stress relief from 51 shop . this was very trying at times because we had to run our heat treatment lines everywhere a weld needed to be stress relieved . in the winters our heating equipment was very popular :)

Monday, July 4, 2016

From: tom maiorano
E-Mail: tmaiorano1@verizon.net
Shop: 38 Shop

Happy birthday, America and to all from those Ship Yard days.

Sunday, July 3, 2016

From: Dennis Kaiser
E-Mail: dennis_kaiser@outlook.com
Shop: Code 911

Dick & Jerry,
Please, please continue to share your memories. They are fun to read.

Sunday, July 3, 2016

From: Kevin Philpott
E-Mail: kpkevinphil@gmail.com
Shop: x38

Your stories are great, just what the web site was created for, but I want to hear some Al Herman x38 shop head stories....

Sunday, July 3, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@veizon.net
Shop: 064

A DYNASTY IS TESTED

Submarines are constructed using the strongest geometric shape for its hull. A 16 foot diameter tube is used for it's pressure hull. It was important that pressure hull retain its circular shape in order to withstand the water pressure when submerged. Large access patches were required during the sub's overhaul to remove/replace equipment. Our shop was required to take readings in way of the access patches before they were cut, and after they were installed to ensure that the circularity integrity of the pressure hull. A combination square with a center head was required to take these readings. Unscheduled reading were requested one Saturday when no one aboard had the need tool. The tool room at pier D didn't have one, but the tool room in the machine shop did. I went to 31 shop's tool room and tied to draw the tool. Only 31 shop could draw tools from this tool room, the tool room guy told me. I would need the permission of the chief quarterman to draw the tool, he told me. I went to the chief's office and asked for permission to draw the tool. He asked what a Shipwright would use this tool for, scratch your back? I explained the purpose, and said I needed it right now. He refused. I returned to pier D and told the ship supt and the officer with him, who happened to be the Yard Production Officer. The Production Officer went into our office and called the Chief quarterman machinist. He told me to go back to the machine shop and get the tool. The chief quarterman was waiting for me at the tool room. He allowed me to draw the tool with the condition that it would be returned by 1600. I returned to pier D, took the readings. I never did return the tool. It was reported lost and the cost was deducted from my pay at $1.25, a real bargain. The chief quarterman was right in one respect, the tool was a good back scratcher. The chief quarterman machinist later became our Group Superintendent and elevator tester. I don't think he remembered our earlier encounter.

Sunday, July 3, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

UNINTENDED CONSEQUENCES

I doubt Elisha Otis foresaw all the applications of his elevator invention. Large personnel and freight elevators were installed in dry docks three and four, at the north end of each dock. They were very useful when working, but they did malfunction at times. We had just finished the dock setup with the docking officer, and started flooding dry dock three. The Services Group Supt along with the Superintendent Painter decided it was an opportune time to test the elevator. They realized they were in the wrong place at the wrong time when they saw the dock floor was covered with two feet of water. They attempted to raise the elevator topside, but it malfunctioned. They couldn't raise the barrier gate to get out of the elevator car either. Someone noticed their predicament and notified the docking officer, who stopped flooding the dock. After the dock was pumped dry, the barrier gate was manually opened, our intrepid Superintendent elevator testers were rescued, and they climbed the stairs to get topside. I doubt if they ever used the elevators again. They probably had more important things to do.

Saturday, July 2, 2016

From: roger nabors
E-Mail:
Shop: 99 and 56

When I first started at the yard I was hired into 56 shop as a pipe coverer 57 shop wasn't in place then. They created 57 shop later but Im not sure when.

Friday, July 1, 2016

From: Tom queenan
E-Mail: Tmquee@verizon.net
Shop: 26/231

Mr. Beggs and Mr.Evans,
I personally enjoy the storied history that you guys bring to the table. I hope you continue.
Tom Q

Friday, July 1, 2016

From: tom maiorano
E-Mail: tmaiorano1@verizon.net
Shop: 38 Shop

Got hired October of '79, just before the SLEP Program started. Not as old as some of you guys, but no spring chicken either. Offered two extensions after the "Yard closed, Sept. 15,1995. Helped close out many buildings back then. August of '96, was offered a painter's slot at Aviation Supply office in N.E. Philly. Finished my time with the Government and drew a small pension starting Sept. 1 of '97. Went to several reunions after the 'Yard closed, but found less and less of my 38 Shop brothers and sisters in attendance. Worked for Metro Machine out of Bldg.990 for 2 years. Wound up working for Global Assoc., who still maintain the mothballed fleet in the back channel from '03 to '09. Since then, have enjoyed being retired, spending time with my four grandchildren, trips to Florida and several cruises to the Eastern and Western Carribean. Enjoy while we can because we're all on the down side of the mountain.

Friday, July 1, 2016

From: RICHARD BEGGS
E-Mail: RICH.BEGGS@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 064

Jerry: I thought that was the premise of this web site. Although we do seem to be alone in that regard.

Thursday, June 30, 2016

From: G EVANS
E-Mail: GEVANS1054@VERIZON.COM
Shop: 26 SHOP

Seems like we have two old guys trading war stories.

Wednesday, June 29, 2016

From: RICHARD BEGGS
E-Mail: RICH.BEGGS@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 064

WHEN YOU FIND YOURSELF IN A HOLE - STOP DIGGING

JERRY: Bureaucrats come in all shapes and sizes. When promoted, they immediately begin to seek ways to increase the scope of their responsibility and size of their domain. The newly promoted supt Woodworker saw an opportunity and proposed merging 57 shop insulators into 64 shop. No one seemed to like the idea. A review by Code 302 and staffing specialists determined that such a merger of two different WG levels would be difficult and not in accordance with classification standards. The Supt Woodworker insisted that great savings were possible in his planned merger. The merger never happened. When he retired, he was replaced by a General Foreman from 57 shop.

Monday, June 27, 2016

From: G EVANS
E-Mail: GEVANS1054@VERIZN.NET
Shop: 26 SHOP

BUREAUCRATES IN ACTION

Working in Supply, material runner for the Groupies now living aboard the LCC-19. INSURV was due on Monday after lunch. Inspection would not start until all safety items are in place. Friday morning handed a INDOC number to check, 92 CO2 fire extinguishers. Out of stock, none in the system. Request went to purchase to buy. Money value high, Buyer needed three quote, there were none.
Saturday 0730 get a call from Supply Duty Officer asking about the INDOC number. Meet me at end of the pier I'll show you something. Off to Bldg. 84, 8th floor. Found the buyer's work sheet. Went to a Master Supply listing of all stock items in the system. Found that Long Beach CA. had 96 items listed. "I'll get hell for this Monday".
He called Long Beach. "This is Capt. M, give the duty officer". You have 96, CO2s listed, I want you to locate them count them and call me back in 10 minutes.
Now Supply works on a priority system. The DO called back and said he counted 94 on hand. LTCDR. LoB--- Now Capt. said I am sending you a Priority ONE request, do you know what that means? Good. (Pri 1==Nuclear related, Signed by activity's CO and/or Ship CO. or as we use to say the Russians are in Camden).
Sunday morning 0730 as I was walking up Pier 4, a flatbed trailer slow moving behind the workers parks under the Hammerhead. The Pier Master comes running "get that f--k'n truck off my pier". The driver said off load it and who is going to sign. After some back and forth I said I will sing. The Pier Master kept repeating his demand.
I went on board and got the Service Groupie to come to the pier. He told the 72 shopper to off load that trailer and get the material aboard the ship and sign for papers.

Saturday, June 25, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

FOOL ME ONCE - SHAME ON YOU
FOOL ME TWICE - SHAME ON ME.

When I started me apprenticeship in 1951, the Shipwright shop was about half scots of an older generation. They were a merry band of brothers full of humor, jokes, and funny stories about their own apprentice years in the shipyards at home. They all had a complete kit of woodworking tools that we envied. There were, however, a few wee knaves among them. It was a sad occasion when one passed away. his friends offered his tool box in a raffle at five bucks a chance. Most of us bought a chanced. The drawing was held on day at lunch time, and the lucky apprentice was named. He got the tool box. The tools seemed to have migrated elsewhere. The devil is in the details we learned. They only offered a tool box, and on reflection it was true. Later, another death, another tool box raffle was offered. There were no takers this time. Tools would be included, we were told. We bit again. The drawing was held, and the lucky apprentice named. He opened the tool box containing a set of caulking irons, mallet and stool which would never be used again in the shipyard. The wee knaves scored again. It was the last tool box raffle ever held.

Thursday, June 23, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

YOU TAKE THE HIGH ROAD
ILL TAKE THE LOW ROAD

Most jobs that we did in the shop were little seen or appreciated. One, however was displayed like a giant canvas. The boot topping, that black band of anti fouling paint that encircles the hull was laid out by our Shipwrights. The layout measurements of the boot topping were established by the Design Division. The upper and lower limits were rarely level or parallel. At one time the dock floor was used as a datum reference point to establish the stations along the hull. A tape measure was dropped to the dock floor to calculate the heights at each station. The first station was at the midships draft figure which was certified as a true height above the keel. Adjustments were made at each station to reflect the aspects of the boot topping. On one occasion, I was working with a team of three other men, laying out the boot topping. The two lead shipwrights were older scots who were not appreciative of each other skills. I was working with on scot on the port side establishing the stations and striking in the line with a chalk line. The painters were right behind us cutting in the black paint. When we reached the bow, our boot topping crossed at the right draft figures. We paused to let the painters catch up. The team working the starboard side were a few minutes behind us. There must have been some miscalculations on the starboard side. There boot topping was a foot above ours. The painters had followed them too, cutting in the black paint. We had a split level boot topping. The painters thought it was funny. We knew our boot topping was correct because it crossed at the right draft figure. The scot on the starboard side insisted he was correct, and that the draft figures were wrong, which was unlikely. The foreman was called to mediate the dispute. It was decided that the apprentice working in the dock, who had nothing to do with any calculation, was to blame for the error. The starboard boot topping had to be laid out again. The painters wisely waited to see the outcome before cutting in the new boot topping. The boot topping from midships to the stern on both sides met at the right draft figure at the stern. New methods were adopted to established the datum reference points, and we never had a split level boot topping again. The painters, in the future always waited to see the outcome of the boot topping layout before cutting it in.

Saturday, June 18, 2016

From: G EVANS
E-Mail: GEVANS1054@VERZON.NET
Shop: 26 SHOP

The ship Rich mention was the "ETHIOPIAN VICTORY". It gave us a little problem. The ship was built under American Bureau of Ship spec's. It required galvanized coating material. Not used by the military any more. It required commercial welding electrodes. With the problems worked out; the shell and internal members in place, the welders jumped on the job. The ABS Inspector showed up. To much welding on the framing. Welder work as if a military vessel, solid weld through out. ABS called for intermitted welds. Inspector made the welders remove the existing work. Too much not to good.

Saturday, June 18, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

WATCH YOUR STEP

In 1967, or so, a freighter owned by Ari Onassis, the future husband of Jackie Kennedy, was coming up river with a load of scrap metal, bound for the Fairless Steel plant at Morrisville, New Jersey. The ship ran aground near Mifflin Range and tore a hole in her bottom. It is rare for a commercial vessel to be docked in a Navy Yard, except in a case of emergency. The ship was docked in Dry Dock Three. The Captain of the ship insisted in going into the dock, while it still had about two feet of water in it. He was warned that there were unguarded drainage gutters and pump well sumps in the dock. He promptly stepped into the pump well sump that was about eight feet deep and filled with water. The officers who were with him pulled him to safety. He continued his inspection, a little wet. The ship was repaired, undocked and continued on her way to the Fairless Plant. I guess her billionaire owner paid for the docking and repairs.

Friday, June 17, 2016

From: Kevin Philpott
E-Mail: kpkevinphil@gmail.com
Shop: x38, C930.1

I also remember Sid Peaks, with massive hands. Google his name and you can find a picture of him along with his boxing record and an article about his fight with Louis. Great man.

Thursday, June 16, 2016

From: G EVANS
E-Mail: GEVANS1054@VERIIZON.NET
Shop: 26 SHOP

Sid Peaks transferred from Brooklyn when it closed. The General Forman II, who also transferred made sure that Sid was in his gang.
At first I thought that Sid was his bodyguard. When the GF II, called Sid would drop everything and see to his needs. In Mayport Sid loved going to the airport, it was over 30 miles north. He would leave in morning and would return late in the afternoon. Some said he had a girlfriend at the airport. Spent a lot of time with him in his enclosure in the bldg. beside DD2.

Wednesday, June 15, 2016

From: Tom queenan
E-Mail: Tmquee@verizon.net
Shop: 26/231

I had the privilege of traveling with Sid Peaks to Mayport ,for the Saratoga boiler repair in 1983. We car pooled and Sid was the driver,the govt. rental was in his name. No problem for the first week or so,but after going to the same restaurant every night I had enough. July 4 th weekend gave us a break and I flew home and got my own car and drove back down to Mayport and did not miss a day. Sid pulled up to pick me up on that Tues,and I waved goodbye,telling him I don't need to carpool anymore.
Sid was the number five heavyweight in the world at one point. He fought Joe Louis.
The mans hands were huge and he was able to carry acetylene bottles . He did not roll them,he picked them up and carried them. Great guy ,once you got to know him. Many like him down the yard,never getting the recognition that they deserved

Wednesday, June 15, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

Mike: You aren't the only one who found a solution to delayed lifts from a crane crew. We had just docked a ship in dry dock two and the crane and crew would normally be busy for the week landing material for the shops aboard ship and into the dock. We had staging material to be landed aboard ship and into the dock. Nothing was happening. The crane and crew were offloading material for the ship's force. I went into the rigger's loft to ask the Foreman rigger why the ship's force was given priority for crane and crew. A sailor was sitting beside the Foreman rigger, along with a box of freshly baked donuts, worth about 5 dollars. We got our lifts , after the ship's force completed it's offloading.

Tuesday, June 14, 2016

From: Mike Bower
E-Mail: Bruddaboo71@msn.com
Shop: 26 Shop

I had the privilege of working with Sid Peaks, he showed me the ropes of being a prep man. We used to change oxygen, acetylene, and other gas cylinders, get the riggers to load pallets of electrodes and other supplies onto the ships. The riggers would always take care of Sid when he asked for a lift, when I was on my own ,things were different. They would say sure , in a couple of minutes. I would come back in half an hour, there they were,still on the pier. This would go on all of the time. My GF, Turtle, had given me a stack of brand new leather work gloves, when I started working with Sid. I thought they were for me. I finally realized differently. I took a pair of these gloves the next time I needed a lift from the riggers, handed them to the rigger and he blew his whistle and got that pallet on board that instant. Funny how things worked at the yard.

Tuesday, June 14, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 64

A FAILUREE TO COMMUNICATE

I attended a seminar at the Rock Island Arsenal. On the first the instructor told us to introduce ourselves to the person sitting to our right, get a brief bio of his position and duties with the government. I listened carefully to the men describe his position and duties, and then I related mine. I was a shipwright, I told him from the Philadelphia Navy Yard. when it was time for him to introduce me to the class. He said" Richard is s stevedore from the docks of Philadelphia. Those attending were mostly office type people, and they must have thought I wandered into this room by mistake.

Tuesday, June 14, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

Dan

I remember Sid Peaks. If he was a prize fighter, he must have been in the heavy weight division.

Monday, June 13, 2016

From: G EVANS
E-Mail: GEVANS1054@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 26

Last of the Roosevelt. Getting ready for undocking, OT Saturday. Using a High Reach that did not have controls in the basket. Told a welder to get in the basket and I would get him up to the patch that needed welding {How hard could it be?}. Up he went, I had him whipping all over the place. Finally got him close enough to weld the patch. He shouted bring me down, I am sick and scared I want to go home. I said not until you finish the job. It took only 10 minutes. Down he came and went home. He never return to the shipyard. Later found out that he got a job at SEPTA. Went to Drexel for Engineering. Became SEPTA's Welding and Structural Eng.
Did I SCARE HIM STRAIGHT?

Monday, June 13, 2016

From: Danny O'Kane
E-Mail: dannyboydpo@rcn.com
Shop: 11 Shop

Back on the Saratoga , 1968 . A young Shipfitter Limited , and a young Welder were given the job of ripping out foundations 4 decks down in one of the magazines . The exhaust blower set up by 99 shop was on the second deck with the exhaust hose going out thru a open door . Someone kept turning off the blower and we had to climb up the escape trunk each time to turn it back on . This got old real quick and we couldn't find out who was turning the blower off . The welder contacted the 26 shop prep man , one Sid Peaks . He kept a watch on the blower and caught a sailor turning the blower off . Seems one of the ship stores was in the area and the noise of the blower was " bothering " him . Sid informed the sailor that it would not be good for the sailors health if he did it again . Did I mention Sid was a Prize Fighter in his youth ? We had no more problems with the blower.
But we did have one other problem . NO ONE told us about galvanize poisoning that happens when you burn galvanize that hasn't been removed !! Three days out sick and no doctors note !!!
Gotta' love 'em !!!

Monday, June 13, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

READY-FIRE-AIM

The time keeping manual states the sole authority to grant non clocking privileges to certain classifications of employees rests with the Shipyard Commander. One Saturday a foreman from the services group was observed and reported leaving the Shipyard prior to 1600. The group supt rescinded the non clocking privileges of all supervisors in the group on any overtime shift. The obvious corrective action was the discipline of the foreman who violated the trust of his position. The supervisors complied with one exception. One General Foreman cited the Civil Rights Act of 1965. the Law said that a person or persons in a classification (supervisor) treated differently than all other persons in that classification is being subjected to discrimination and a violation of their civil rights, a federal offense, All the other supervisors continued to punch a time card on any overtime shift during the tenure of the group supt. Samuel Beckett, a Irish author and playwright one said the some people needed to carry a stone to put in their mouth to prevent them from making hasty, foolish and irrational decisions . We had a man who needed a rock.

Sunday, June 12, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

HARD FEELINGS

The relationship between the Shipyard Docking Officer and 64 shop has almost always been good. There have been exceptions, however. After checking the arrangement of the docking blocks, on one occasion, the Docking Officer unreasonably ordered the dock to be flooded while two shipwrights were still in the dock gathering their tools. I asked the Docking Officer to stop the flooding until the men were out of he dock. "just giving them a little incentive to hurry" he said. The men made it to the mid dock stairs, just ahead of the water. They reached topside, panting with exertion, and pissed. Our further relations with this Docking Officer was, at bested, strained. He left when his tour of duty was completed. We wished him Fair Winds and a Following Sea. NOT!

Saturday, June 11, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

IF I HAD IT TO DO OVER

The office I worked out of in bldg. 177 was the original office of the yard's Dock Masters for a long time, maybe 100 years. In its files was the log of their daily observations of ongoing work. They included hand drawn sketches of docking arrangements for all types of ships such as the first iron clad monitors used during the Civil War. Sketches of copper sheathing being installed on wooded hulled ships, of the blocking used for launching the ships built at the yard. They also included the actual progress of each docking, including any unplanned incidents, even the lack of attention of an employee. I always wanted to make copies of these records, but never got around to it. They were destroyed when the building was destroyed by fire.

Friday, June 10, 2016

From: G EVANS
E-Mail: GEVANS1054@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 26 SHOP

MORE HOT WORK, Roosevelt. Shop 41 was asked to help the Ship's Crew to repair a boiler assigned to them. The bottom of the fire box was about fall into the bilge. The 99 Shop's sniffer refuse ok the room for hot work. After bilge clean up the best possible, they still refused hot work. Along came a ship's officer. Lets fill the room with "Light Water". A chemical that covers oil and locks in the fumes. This was done with the Crew catching the spark with "ASTOSILL". The day was saved.

Friday, June 10, 2016

From: Danny O'kane
E-Mail: dannyboydpo@rcn.com
Shop: 11 Shop

Back to the top of the mast on the Saratoga . It was a real climb to the top and you didn't want to make too many trips . At 18 years old it wasn't too bad for me . My welder was a bit older , probably in his 50's . He would come up to the job , hook up his torch and stinger and wait for someone to walk by the manifold which was on the flight deck . He would then yell down " Hey buddy , turn on number 4 " . No problem . One day he goes thru his routine , waits for someone to walk by the manifold and yells down " Hey sailor , turn on number 4 " . The sailor looks to see where the yelling is coming from and Jimmy yells down again . The sailor looks up at Jimmy and gives him the finger ! I swear , Jimmy slid down the mast to catch the sailor . The boy could run !!
By the time Jimmy got back up to check his torch , it was lunch time .
Gotta' love 'em !!

Friday, June 10, 2016

From: G EVANS
E-Mail: GEVANS1054@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 26 SHOP

MORE HOT WORK, Roosevelt. Shop 41 was asked to help the Ship's Crew to repair a boiler assigned to them. The bottom of the fire box was about fall into the bilge. The 99 Shop's sniffer refuse ok the room for hot work. After bilge clean up the best possible, they still refused hot work. Along came a ship's officer. Lets fill the room with "Light Water". A chemical that covers oil and locks in the fumes. This was done with the Crew catching the spark with "ASTOSILL". The day was saved.

Friday, June 10, 2016

From: G EVANS
E-Mail: GEVANS1054@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 26 SHOP

HOT WORK. Assigned a former Apprentice Welder to work with 38 Shop in the shaft alley. Told him how dangerous it was because of the fuel onboard. Also told that I never had fire on an of my ships. He came on the job about 9 AM. At 1030 AM the ship's alarm went off. The Welder came up to me "It wasn't me", that crazy machinist through his cigarette in a oil can.

Thursday, June 9, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.begs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

READY FIRE AIM

One Saturday a foreman from the services group was observed and reported leaving the yard prior to 1600. The group supt took immediate action. he rescinded the non clocking privileges of all the supervisors in the group on any overtime shift. The obvious and correct action would be to discipline the foreman who violated the trust of his position. One General Foreman continued giving non clocking privileges to his foremen on overtime shifts. He reasoned that the Shipyard Commander had the sole authority to grant non clocking privileges. Therefore he was the the sole authority to rescind them. The General Foreman explained this to the group supt when he became aware of the General Foreman's refusal to obey his order. All the supervisors in the services group, with the noted exception, continued to punch in/out on a time card on overtime shifts. Samuel Beckett, the Irish author, once suggested that some people carry a stone to place in their mouths to prevent them from making hasty, foolish decisions. Our group Supt needed a rock.

Thursday, June 9, 2016

From: Bill Dougherty
E-Mail: wdoughe522@aol.com
Shop: 17/252

Sad news to report. We just lost one of the good guys, Jimmy Lafferty x-17/251. Don't know the circumstances of Jimmy's passing. had talked to him about a month ago & He seemed OK at that time. RIP Jimmy !!!!

Wed 5:21pm
JAMES J., age 67, June 6, 2016. Jim, known to friends as "Laff" and "Jimbo". Son of Helen Katherine and the late Joseph Michael Lafferty.
He is survived by his mother, sister, Geraldine Cocker (Robert); a niece, Julie Ann Dengler (Brian), and nephew, Robert James Cocker (Katie). Great uncle of Graham and Gillian. Jim was a member of the Father Judge Class of 1966. Visitation Saturday, 8:45 to 9:45 A.M., at St. Bernard Church, 7341 Cottage St., Phila. PA 19136. Funeral Mass 10 A.M. Interment private. In lieu of flowers, donations in his memory to Fr. Judge Alumni, c/o Fr. Judge High School, 3301 Solly Ave., Phila. PA 19136, would be appreciated.
 

www.burnsfuneralhome.com
- See more at: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/philly/obituary.aspx?n=james-j-lafferty&pid=180256607&fhid=4467#sthash.sm6u9q83.dpuf

Burns Funeral Home : Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (PA) Burns Funeral Home : Family Owned And Operated Since 1939 - Email us at burnsfh@comcast.net, Or Call 215-637-1414 burnsfuneralhome.com

Thursday, June 9, 2016

From: Tom queenan
E-Mail: Tmquee@verizon.net
Shop: 26/231

Dirty money

Certain jobs were nastier than others. ( dirty money).If you happened to be assigned to one of these jobs,you received the appropriate compensation. One of my fellow welders( nick devitis) was working side by side with a fellow who was from another shop. In conversation he found out the other worker was getting " dirty money" and he did not see it in his paycheck. He questioned this practice and it went all the way to the shop head. Lo and behold they figured out this conundrum. The person who was receiving the dirty money compensation,would no longer receive it. It made for a great working atmosphere between the two mechanics, once they found out that dirty money was no longer being paid. The Supt. And his cohorts must have had a good laugh.

Thursday, June 9, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

DO YOU KNOW WHAT I AM SAYING?

The performance of employees were rated each year. A few were rated Outstanding which included a substantial cash award. Documentation in the form of a letter explaining the merits of the employee's performance was required. The letters were reviewed and edited prior to submission to a panel for consideration. My letter for one man was returned to me after its review. "Vocabulary not expressive enough" it said. I rewrote the letter using language that I thought the man would understand and appreciate, and best expressed the reasons why the man should be rated Outstanding. It was reviewed and returned to me again. "Expand" it said. I tried once more. It was returned again. Further explanation required, it said. I resubmitted my first letter. The man received his Outstanding rating. When the award was presented to the man. the group Supt asked me to read the letter I had purported to write. I scanned the letter. I would have been embarrassed trying to pronounce the words and impart their meaning. I handed the letter to the man. "I think this says you deserve an Outstanding" award, and shook his hand. I don't know who wrote that letter, but he must have been outstanding in his English classes.

Wednesday, June 8, 2016

From: Danny O'Kane
E-Mail: dannyboydpo@rcn.com
Shop: 11 Shop

212'6" ABL . What is this ?? It's how high we were working on the mast of the Saratoga . 212'6" Above Base Line . We were installing a new foundation for a piece of electronic gear in 1968 .This was the very top of the mast .
Little known piece of information I learned on this job . The Saratoga was built in the Brooklyn Navy Yard . They actually hinged the mast across the flight deck to clear one of the bridges when she left the yard . At the base of the mast was a huge set of hinges that once the mast was raised back up for good , they were welded shut . There was a recess in the island for the mast to fit into . Awesome .
Had a great view from the top of the mast . Not too many bosses came to visit .

Wednesday, June 8, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

FIRST RESPONDERS

The responsibility to fight fires aboard ships, in commission, was the ship's force. There were, however, ships undergoing overhaul at the yard not in commission. The six DLG'S the yard overhauled was an example. Shops were assigned different duties in the event of a fire. 64 shop was to bring CO-2 bottle extinguishers to the scene of the fire and suppress the flames. Other shops were assigned water fire hose stations. the shop requested training in these duties. The fire department agreed and gave the training. Fire drills were conducted at times. They were not too successful. Some Members of the fire fighting teams were not on board when the alarm went off. Others claimed they didn't hear it, or ignored it. Others just left the ship with everyone else. Fortunately the fire fighting teams were never called to action. The tragic fire aboard the Forrestal at the Brooklyn Navy Yard was a lesson learned. Let the professionals handle it. Haul ass!

Monday, June 6, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

TOO ERR IS HUMAN - PART TWO

I was informed by the yard dispensary that a chest x-ray showed that I had an aortic aneurysm. X-rays taken elsewhere disproved this and a conclusion was reached that the radiologist may have read another person's x-ray. I informed the dispensary of my doctor's reports and x-rays. I hope the dispensary and radiologist reviewed the process and identified the right man with this serious condition.

Monday, June 6, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

OOPS!

WE were required to have yearly chest x-rays because we were involved with asbestos removal aboard ship. After one such x-ray I was called to the yard dispensary and given a sealed letter. "Do not open this letter and take it to your family doctor as soon as possible". the nurse told me. Of course I opened the letter as soon as I stepped outside. The letter said that I had an Aortic Aneurysm that needed immediate treatment. I signed off and went to my family doctor. He read the letter, called the hospital and told me to go to the Emergency Room. They were waiting or me. They took a series of chest x-rays. Your doctor will tell you the results, the nurse told me, but there was no Aortic Aneurysm. When I got home, the my doctor told me the same thing. "They must have been looking at another person's x-ray" he concluded. I forgot about it. X-rays taken in the following years never showed an Aortic Aneurysm, or any lung problems. X-rays taken elsewhere, however, clearly indicated Pleural thickening of the lungs due to asbestos exposure. These x-rays and x-rays taken by the asbestos company's doctor were the basis for a successful lawsuit against the asbestos companies.

Sunday, June 5, 2016

From: G EVANS
E-Mail: GEVANS1054@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 26

Roosevelt again. I worked in Admin for awhile. One of my jobs was to up date the Shipyard "DISASTER CONTROL PROCEDURE", Cason failing, Major on board fire, Ship falling off the keel blocks. Walking on the hanger deck suddenly the aft end of the ship shook, a loud bang, again it happened. I thought the ship was falling over, off the blocks. It was 72 and 38 using a ram to turn the prop wrench in order to get prop nut off. What your mind goes through.

Sunday, June 5, 2016

From: Dennis W Maloney
E-Mail: dwmaloney2@gmail.com
Shop: 056

I saw that Lou Marano, Jim Brandemarte and "Hit it Bernie" Bernard died, wow? I worked with them all and admired them greatly, talented, honorable people. I transferred to Grand Canyon after the yard and have since worked at the VA in Palo Alto and Sepulveda; California. Presently I am a pipefitter instructor in San Diego, CA. Best wishes to all and my sympathy to the family's of those have passed.

Saturday, June 4, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

A THIEF BY ANY OTHER NAME

During the period that we were paid by paper checks, an incident occurred involving a transplant from Boston, via Brooklyn and a man working in the same compartment with him. The checks were distributed during the day by the Foreman. The potential loss or damage to the checks didn't seem to be considered. The transplant reported that his check was missing. He had searched himself an his tool bag without success. He suggested that the man working near him could have access to his check. He tended to pontificate when given the opportunity. He declared that theft was the greatest sin, and compounded when one working man steals from another. He had just called the other man a thief, which was not appreciated. The foreman, who had distributed checks for many years, knew the habits of men receiving them. Some put their checks in pockets, in their tool bags, and others in the lining of their helmets. The missing check was found in the transplant's helmet, where he had put it and forgotten. The foreman suggested an apology was warranted . Our transplant declared "an apology is a sign of weakness". and refused. The two men were separated before the transplant could convey any more pearls of wisdom and avoid a large dental bill. Later the transplant was indicted, but not convicted, of theft of services, by Con Edison of New York where he owned an apartment building. The building had an illegal connection to the electric grid. He pled not guilty , claiming the connection was there when he bought the building. He never noticed the lack of billing by Con Edison, he said. "I always pay my bills when presented. Only a thief would do otherwise" he declared. And the band played on.

Friday, June 3, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

MELTDOWN

Building 177 was partitioned off to form the Plastic shop after most of the woodworking machinery was removed because of alleged non-use The plastic shop used different resins and excelerators , some of which had to be stored in a portable refer outside of the building. One day as I was returning to the building about 1615 I noticed smoke coming from the refer. I called the fire department and they arrived within 10 minutes. I told the fire chief about the resins stored in the refer and said that maybe water may not be the best suppressor if he found flames inside the refer when they opened the door. He said "we got this" One fireman was ready to open the door, as another was ready too spray water inside. I backed away about 50 feet. The door was opened and water was sprayed inside the refer. It promptly exploded. I left the clean up to the fire department, and went home. The plastic shop got a new refer, and the band played on. I saw on the nightly news after I had retired, that building 177 was completely destroyed by a fire in the plastic shop during the second shift. An exothermic reaction (high heat) caused by resins stored there caused smoke and flames that ignited other materials. The fire department prevented the fire from spreading to other buildings, but couldn't save building 177.

Thursday, June 2, 2016

From: G EVANS
E-Mail: GEVANS1054@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 26

More Roosevelt. When I could get no the ship after dry docking, I had only two job. I walk on with the Progressman carrying his service board request box. I check with X38 and X41. I went to go off the ship an hour later. Shop 26"s request slips were spilling over on to deck. Only two jobs on this RA?

Thursday, June 2, 2016

From: G EVANS
E-Mail: GEVANS1054@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 26

As a new Forman I expected to work on new construction. Shop Head call me in his office and said I was bound for the subs. Most of my experience was on building ships not repairs. He said he wanted a clean slate. So out I went to a sub just put on the Marine Rail. As I was introduced to my crew, I was told I should never assign a job to PETE BALLARD, He will find his own. Pete would hook up his burning line so it would cover the entire Marine Rail, both sides. A good man to have around.

Thursday, June 2, 2016

From: RICHARD BGGS
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

WOULD SOMEONE RID ME OF THIS MEDDLESOME MAN

We had a temporary employee who was overly sensitive to his environment. He reported asbestos fibers in the air where sensitive instrument reported none. He reported excess carbon dioxide aboard ship. He thought he found PCB's around transformer stations that weren't there. He complained about the high noise and low light levels aboard ship. He complained about poor ventilation and welder's fumes, and unsafe walking surfaces aboard ship. He complained about the poor quality of the shipyard drinking water. He not only stopped his own work, but also of those around him. His complaints may have been valid, to a degree, but the conditions were minimal and within safe working conditions. Despite his hyper sensitivity to safety , he was repeatedly cited for failure to wear protective safety equipment. Like Sir Thomas Moore, his temporary position was terminated.

Thursday, June 2, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

THE EYE OF THE BEHOLDER

The yearly physicals for the General Foremen in our shop resulted in some unsettling news. The little Vietnamese Doctor (he was about 5 feet tall and weighted about 100 pounds) described each of us as obese. We were probably 10-15 pounds overweight, but didn't consider ourselves as obese. We must have looked like whales to this little guy. We were hardly whales. Orcas maybe.

Thursday, June 2, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

A FAILURE TO COMMUNNICATE

There are shipyard instructions to cover every possible situation that may occur. One of the most involved is the report of a missing man. A foreman working for me one Saturday reported that one of gang failed to muster and check out at 1600. The shipyard instruction required an intensive search of the ship, including open tanks and voids, and the adjacent pier or dock. We made our search without success. The next required action was to call the man's home to see if he was safely home. No one answered the phone. We were required to notify the Shipyard duty officer if the search needed to be expanded. The next move was to involve the Phila Police Dept. I called the police headquarters at 8th and Race, and explained the situation. I requested a patrol car go to the man's home to see if he was there. They said they would, but I was left with the impression that they didn't quite understand me. An hour later I got a call from the duty officer, telling me that a Phila cop was at the main gate looking for a missing man; me. I had to go the main gate and convince the Phila cop that I was not missing, and that his real mission was to go to the real missing man's home to find him. He called his dispatcher to confirm this, and left. Around 1900. the duty officer called and told me the cop found the missing man at the corner bar where his wife had told him her husband probably was. She also told the cop to bring that SOB home.

Wednesday, June 1, 2016

From: Mike Dougherty
E-Mail: mikedougherty63@yahoo.com
Shop: 56 shop

I,like many others,was was in a tough spot with the yard closing.The career transition center found me a job at the Corpus Christi Army Depot as a WG-10 pipefitter.I had been in management for 20 years but I loved working with my hands again.I tried to keep my past a secret and my coworkers accepted me.After a year I was forced(they threatened my save pay)to take a work leader job.For the next 10 years I clashed with my bosses a lot.I disobeyed some illegal direct orders but I was fired for failure to notify.Armed police escorted me off the base in disgrace.I appealed to MSPB and won my case.I returned to the base for a retirement lunch in my honor and retired with 36 years of service 10 years ago.PNSY was the best.

Wednesday, June 1, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

NURSE RACHETT

There was a red headed nurse at the yard dispensary when I was an apprentice. I had two encounters with her with a week. The first time I visited the dispensary with a cut on my forehead. The red headed nurse asked me how I had cut my head. I explained that I was driving 20 penny spikes into an oak block, and that I missed the spike and hammer bounced back and hit me in the forehead. "You must be an idiot" she said. "You probably lost one of your two brain cells". she said. She treated the wound and discharged me. I was back two days later. I had been adjusting a plumb bob when the string parted and the bob fell on my foot. I was sitting waiting to be treated in the waiting room. I took off my boot and sock to look at the cut on my big toe. It was minor, but bleeding, and a puddle soon formed around my foot. The red headed nurse went ballistic when she saw the blood. She was upset about the blood on her floor, and not worried about me bleeding out. "Oh" she said "the idiot has returned". "Why didn't you tell someone you were bleeding, you idiot! "You haven't gotten any smarter" she said. "But I have" I told her. I got treated faster this time". I got a bandage on my toe and was discharged. I think she may have added the noun "idiot" as my middle name on my chart. I didn't have a reason to visit the dispensary for many years. I never saw nurse Rachett again.

Tuesday, May 31, 2016

From: Tom queenan
E-Mail: Tmquee@verizon.net
Shop: 26/231

Not going back as far as you boys,but a certain 26 shop foreman ( Pete Ballard) relayed this story to me when I was under his charge. Supposedly,he cooked up a mean rack of ribs,and he was in charge of the kitchen at the back channel,while working on a sub. While basting and attending to those succulent morsels on a OT weekend,a surprise visit from a Supt. Caught this budding chef with his apron on,and it wasn't a welding leather. What is a chef in training supposed to do? Why offer said ribs to the Supt. Never had a problem after that and had a customer for life.

Monday, May 30, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

FOOLED AGAIN

One assignment I tried to avoid was monitoring the activity at lunch time of those men who acted as lunch carriers for their gang. The man in question was required to have a permission slip or pass indicating that he was a lunch carrier. Not everyone followed this procedure. There were quite a few men at the lunch truck from the cafeteria outside Bldg 994. I stopped one young man and asked to see his pass. He handed me his box of sandwiches and sodas, and said " hold this and Ill be right back with the pass". I realized he was smarter than me when he didn't return. What could I do? I delivered the food to his gang in the field office of 57 shop, which they greatly appreciated. I found something else to do at lunch time after that.

Monday, May 30, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

THE ARRIVAL

There was a tv series about the FBI and their investigations of Federal crimes. The chief inspector always arrived at the scene of the crime by helicopter. Unknown persons broke into our storage locker, at bldg. 177, and took 12 boxes of floor tile. The yard police investigated the incident and concluded that unknown persons broke into our storage locker and took 12 cases of floor tile. An unresolved crime of this magnitude obviously demanded further action. Two young men arrived at our office one morning and identified themselves as FBI agents assigned to investigated the great tile robbery. There were three supervisors in the office at the time, each turned to look out the window at the adjacent parking lot. The agents looked at each other, and then asked "whats going on?"' We are just looking for your helicopter, was the answer. They didn't have a clue what we talking about. When we explained, they agreed it was sort of funny. They went through the drill of investigating the incident . They left in the sedan they arrived in, adding another page in the annals of dealing with people not ready for prime time.

Sunday, May 29, 2016

From: G EVANS
E-Mail: GEVANS1054@VERZN.NET
Shop: 26 SHOP

Dick Beggs mention the USS Roosevelt, I have a story also. Recalled from exile (Submarines)a new Shop Head and the Groupie met me at DD5. The Groupie said to me "Kid you have a tiger by the tail". No fuel oil or JP5 was off loaded. The Shop Head asked why are they through the staging into the dock ? We also had trouble getting welding service hook up. The 72 Shop Pier Master said to take our equipment to the west side of the dock. We did this, not much there.

Friday, May 27, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

CLOSE ENCOUNTERS OF THE THIRD KIND

There WAS SOME CONCERN about the stability of the Saratoga when it was floated for the first time near the end of it time in DD-5. during it"s Slep overhaul. There were little clearances for the elevators, stowed at the hanger deck, and the dock coping. We had set up very sensitive instruments on board to indicate any possible listing of the ship. I had to go on board half a dozen times during the flooding of the dock to assure that the instruments were reacting properly. There was a large African-American yard cop stationed at the brow. Each time he asked for my badge, and recorded my name and check number, and times of boarding/departure. We did this dance 6 times in the course of an hour. He was a very diligent cop. It was rumored that he had once cited his wife for illegal parking in the yard. The ship lifted off the blocks without any list. About a year later someone broke into our storage locker in Bldg 177 and took a dozen boxes of floor tile. We reported this to security. A detective arrived to investigate. It was the same cop from my encounters on the Saratoga. Of course, I asked for his credentials. He gave me a hard look, but showed me his badge. I noted his name, check number and time of arrival. He asked some questions, and then went to look at the storage locker. He returned to my office for further questions. I was sitting there, smiling about to asked to see his credentials again. Before I could ask, he said " if you ask to see my credentials again, Ill arrest you for obstruction of justice". He finished his investigation and left. We got a report later than said "unknown persons broke in the storage locker and took 12 boxes of tile". We had many encounters in the years following as he manned the CIA gate. He always took a close look at my badge on each occasion.

Wednesday, May 25, 2016

From: RICHARD BEGGS
E-Mail: RICH.BEGGS@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 064

DUAL PSYCHOTIC EPOSIDES

We had just put the carrier Roosevelt into DD 4 for emergency shaft work. The group supt from services group promised the group supt from machinery group that staging would be under the shafts as soon as the dock was dry. we had pre-staged rolling stagings topside read to be lowered into the dock as soon as the crane was done with its priority lifts such as landing brows and shore power. The crane wasn't available for the first hour to lower the staging into the dock. the Group Supt from machinery group was shouting at the group supt from services group that the promised staging was not under the shaft. The group supt from services group, ordered the staging to be disassembled and lowered into the dock by rope. I tried to explain that this was counter productive, but by direct order, he insisted I comply. It was a slow process, and seeing this the group supt ordered that the staging parts be thrown into the dock. I told him that the order was irrational, illegal and crazy, whereupon I was relieved of duty and sent home. The staging parts were thrown into the dock damaging most for use. The machinery group supt got his staging in the dock, but it took 6 shifts to remove all the damaged parts and rebuild the staging under the shafts. I was never disciplined for refusing that direct order, but years later I faced the services group supt across the table at a promotion interview, and I suspect he remembered that episode. I didn't get the promotion.

Monday, May 23, 2016

From: RICHARD BEGGS
E-Mail: RICH.BEGGS@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 064

It was determined by the shipyard' Industrial Hygienist that those employees working with fiberglass insulation would be required to wear protective coveralls, and wear dust masks. At a meeting with the shop, he said the fibers were not harmful, like asbestos fibers, and would be easily passed by the body. He said the fibers were only an irritant to the skin which could be easily avoided by wearing the protective equipment. Hs said that you could eat the fiberglass insulation without harm. He declined to demonstrate this. The employees sought extra compensation for handling toxic materials, and was granted it, but not retroactively.

Monday, May 23, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

I was a Foreman in 1967 working on the overhaul of the New Jersey. We were repairing the teak deck forward of the number one turret. A reporter and a camera-man from the New York Times, escorted by an IRO rep came on board. They went into the turret. The IRO rep asked me, since I was the only Foreman available, to climb into the turret with the reporter and camera-man. They posed me looking at the breach assembly as if I knew what it was. They took a series of photos and left. After the ship was commissioned, I received a copy of the photo with the caption reading "Yard foreman inspects the breach assembly of the 16 inch gun of number two turret". They misspelled my name and used the wrong turret. I don't know if the photo was ever used. The New York Times was a very respected paper. Its banner read "All the News That is fit to print". I think the word "accurate" should be inserted in their banner.

Monday, May 23, 2016

From: RICHARD BEGGS
E-Mail: RICH.BEGGS@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 064

While the Block Island was in the back channel we were tasked to take measurements of the hanger deck to see if it could accommodate the new helo's that were to used if the Block Island would be LPH-1. Apparently the hanger deck was too small, and the project was canceled. It did move into Dry Dock for a short period. We were removing some wood deck planks in way of access openings, and were recycling the cut up wood planks into the dry dock for the fitters to use for their fires.

Monday, May 23, 2016

From: G EVANS
E-Mail: GEVANS1054@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 26

Quick Money
USS Block Island II, CVA 104, LPH-1. The yard was off loading furniture in the back channel. Word came down that the job might be canceled. Quickly the ship was moved into DD4. Thirty-five rated Flame Cutters were moved on board. They were told to cut out all non structural bulkheads and all non water tight bulkheads on the second deck and under the flight deck. As I left the job for another project, I looked back from the end of DD4,the ship looked like it was in a shroud of smoke. Thus came the LPH 3.

Sunday, May 22, 2016

From: RICHARD BEGGS
E-Mail: RICH.BEGGS@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 064

USE IT OR LOSE IT

Some efficiency expert decided that all the machinery in our shop at Bldg 177 would have a clock attached that would record the actual hours of use. We had a large table saw, two band saw, a joiner, a planer, a Dewalt radial arm saw, a large vertical drill press, and a bench drill press. After a year of study it was determined that most of the equipment failed to meet the minimum number of hours of use. All the equipment, except a band saw was removed. Now the almost daily demand for the use of the equipment, although not lasting 8 hours for each machine, would be done in the main shop at Bldg 10. Its true we now had more floor space, and less saw dust to clean up. But its doubtful that it improved the efficiency of the shop at all.

Wednesday, May 18, 2016

From: RICHARD BEGGS
E-Mail: RICH.BEGGS@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 064

ITS ABOUT TIME

The time keeping/reporting system was intended to be used by honest people. There are, however, people who will job the system. A prime example was one of our employees. He had spent some time working in the comptrollers office while on light duty. He learned how the system worked. He put his knowledge to work when he returned to full duty, back in he shop. He knew that time clocks only recorded the time and day, and not the date. He invested some time on a weekend by punching in/out some red striped time cards. Any of these time cards would be valid on any Saturday or Sunday. He filled out the time cards with valid job orders from MIS system reports that every foreman had and were not secure. He signed my name, which was not needed to be validated, and used my supervisor code which not a secret. He dropped the time cards in the box at the time clock on Monday morning. He was discovered by a MIS system report on excessive overtime of employees, and the shop records that indicated that he never worked on any of the dates shown in the report. His pay was garnished to recover the false overtime earnings, and he became a Confidential Informant for NCIS.

Monday, May 16, 2016

From: RICHARD BEGGS
E-Mail: RICH.BEGGS@VERIZON.NET
Shop: O64

64 shop was new to the asbestos abatement program for removing asbestos from aboard ship. 57 shop removed all the asbestos from everything in the machinery spaces, and 64 shop was tasked to remove it from vent ducts in all other spaces. The shop received training from an industrial hygienist from the yard dispensary. First he informed us of the potential health hazards of inhaling asbestos fibers. He told us of the proper procedures in removing and handling asbestos materials, and he demonstrated the procedure to don and remove protective coveralls, and of the correct respirator to use. He closed by saying" that 25% of employees using the proper procedures and equipment would still be at risk of inhaling asbestos fibers." However, he stated" that's only my opinion and not that of the Shipyard hygienist. I think his opinion prompted him to seek career opportunities elsewhere. We never saw him again. What he did accomplish was the very, very careful procedures followed by those employees removing asbestos.

Monday, May 16, 2016

From: RICHARD BEGGS
E-Mail: RICH.BEGGS@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 064

LABOR/MANAGEMENT RELATIONS

It seemed difficult for some Naval Officers to adapt to 20th century version of labor/management relations and acknowledge that there was a contract in effect at the yard. Pat Walsh from 56 shop, and an officer in his shop's union, had requested a meeting with the Production Officer to discuss some issue in his shop. He finally got his meeting. He was told "be in the Production Officer's office at 1545. It was probably thought that no yard bird would ever think of staying on his own time for anything. They didn't know Pat Walsh. Pat asked me to attend with him, since it was the practice to never go alone to one of these meetings. We got there 15 minutes late. The PO seemed irate. He said" you asked for this meeting son, and your late, and I don't like your attitude". The PO didn't know Pat Walsh. Pat said" I'm not your son, and I don't like your ####ing attitude either". The issued was never discussed and we left. The issue was resolved later by other parties.

Monday, May 16, 2016

From: G EVANS
E-Mail: GEVANS1054@VERIZON,NET
Shop: 26

SOUP. As a Apprentice Instructor in 650 bldg., Jackie May 41 shop, Danny Burke 56 shop decided to have a "Soup Club" during "Lent". We each supply soup, Jackie May did the cooking. Started on Monday with a soup. what was left over was mixed with Tuesday's menu. I don't know what we had on Fridays. Latter I found out that Jackie would mix the previous weeks leftovers. I stopped having soup.

Monday, May 16, 2016

From: G EVANS
E-Mail: GEVANS1054@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 26

SICK LEAVE As a 4 year apprentice 1959, I was invited to watch Shops budget hearings with the Production Officer. The PO strongly objected to the sick leave being close to 3% of the work force. My last budget hearing in 1987, the PO was objecting to the 7% rate.
As First year Apprentice I was issued a letter of requirement, two Fridays and one Monday. It must have worked. I retired with more than a year on the books.

Sunday, May 15, 2016

From: Richar Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

NCIS
The Naval Civilian Investigative Service is/was a television series for a few years, and also had a real unit on the base. They investigated crimes such as theft, drug activity and other felonies. They used confidential informants to facilitate their investigations like police departments everywhere. They asked if our shop would loan one of our men to them. I don't know how they selected this man, but apparently knew something about him, that we did not. We saw him wearing different shop helmets around the yard, but I don't think his charade fooled anyone. I don't know if he ever helped NCIS in any was, but he sure seemed happy in his assignment. One day he disappeared without explanation to the shop. No one seemed to miss him.

Sunday, May 15, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

Some of my most enjoyable moments have been performing duties not included in my position description. I was an apprentice working with the maintenance gang out of Erie Bay. We were loading armor plate that was being cut to size by 26 shop down on shipways number 3. The overhead crane that still ran from the shipways across Porter avenue was delivering the plates to a railroad car for shipment to the University of Pennsylvania for some radiation shielding experiment . It was February and very cold, and we had a salamander going with a coke fire. The riggers arrived, one carrying a large pot, and the other with a bag of navy beans and a large soup bone. After the rigger/cook started the soup atop the salamander, It was my job to watch and stir. At lunch time, the armor was loaded, the soup done, and We enjoyed the best navy bean soup I ever tasted.

Saturday, May 14, 2016

From: RICHARD BEGGS
E-Mail: RICH.BEGGS@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 064

Our shop tried different methods to control the alleged abuse of sick leave. A person returning from sick leave was interviewed by the Chief-Quarterman in his office. The office looked like a real doctors waiting room on occasion. The employees didn't seem intimidated and enjoyed the few hours off of the job. The Chief-Quarterman, did however, earn the unofficial title of "Doctor" Sending a Foreman to the sick person's home was another method that also failed. The Foreman, having no medical training in diagnosing an illness was of little value in determining the validly of the person's claim. Much later, employees whose record indicated a possible abuse of sick leave were issued a "letter of requirement" that made the employee have a Doctor's certification for any absence.
Two or three such letters were issued, I think, in a shop of about 300, proving the alleged abuse did not exist. Much, much later I was asked by a member of a selection panel for promotion, "whats you plan to control the abuse of sick leave?" I haven't got a clue, I thought was probably not the right answer. Instead, I answered " my method to control hypothetical, as well as real situations, is to plan for the worse and hope for the best. I didn't get the job.

Friday, May 13, 2016

From: RICHARD BEGGS
E-Mail: RICH.BEGGS@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 064

Gerry: I'm glad to see your man got his 50 year pin in the proper way. It may have been the exception to the rule.

Thursday, May 12, 2016

From: G EVANS
E-Mail: GEVANS1054@VERIZON.COM
Shop: 26

Rich, 26 shop had a welder who got 50 years of government service. The Shipyard Commander, Admiral Seigenthaler, went to DD4 and DD5 to present the award. Not many other people showed up.

Wednesday, May 11, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

Henry Ford once proclaimed "democracy stops at the factory gate" It did for many years until Walter Reuther and his UAW union taught Mr. Ford about labor management relations. Democracy also stopped at the Navy Yard gate too, until President Kennedy, by executive order, in 1960, allowed trade unions to petition for exclusive recognition to represent workers in federal agencies. The Metal Trades Council, led by Danny Burke, negotiated the first labor management agreement in the history of the US Navy.

Thursday, May 12, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

FORM OVER FUNCTION

We had little inactions with ship's force during the overhaul of the DLG'S, and even less with their officers. One of our assignments during the habitability phase was installing deck tile in the berthing compartments, mess decks and passageways. We also installed rubber matting in the electronic spaces. A new material was introduced to replaced the diamond rubber matting we had used before. It was solid vinyl and could be heat sealed at the seams. It was dark blue or green with white marbleizing. We received a complaint from the officer in charge of the secure teletype space. The installation was ok, he said, but there wasn't enough white in the marbleizing. My foreman, not noted for his tact, asked the officer what the name of the compartment was. Its secure teletype, he said. My foreman replied "when its changed to bordello, we will be back with a more appropriate material. We left the space, the ship and a very irate sensitive officer. We never heard about it again.

Wednesday, May 11, 2016

From: Richard Beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

Someone once said "the more things change, the more they remain the same." I disagree.

When I started as an apprentice in 1951 in 61 shop the shop Master would come out to the shop and present length of service pins and a framed certificate to those employees completing 20 or more years of service. The Master made a nice speech and thanked the employee for his years of faithful service. It seemed a different culture then. I don't recall any such occasions like the above after I returned from military service. The shop Master had retired, along with most of the older senior supervisors. I received my 20,25,30, and 35 year pin through the yard mail in a little brown envelope, probably mailed by some clerk. No handshake or framed certificate. That older generation knew what they were doing. I got another pin when I retired, along with a shipyard plaque. Mailed to me at home.

Wednesday, May 11, 2016

From: RICHARD BEGGS
E-Mail: RICH.BEGGS@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 064

Dan: now I know where all our oak wedges and wood packing was going.

Tuesday, May 10, 2016

From: Danny O'Kane
E-Mail: dannyboydpo@rcn.com
Shop: 11 Shop

COLD in the winter ,,HOT in the summer !! Shipyards are no place for the feint of heart . One very cold winter we were cutting access holes in the shell from the dry dock and it was brutal cold . We kept a fire going under the ship and anything that was wooden was fair game . We heard some one yelling down to us to put out the fire . I looked up and informed this very young Navy officer that if he wanted the fire out to come on down and put it out . After we vacated the area he came down but not by himself . Seems he had called for backup from the shipyard police . And you wonder why the heads were crowded all the time in the winter !!

Monday, May 9, 2016

From: RICHARD BEGGS
E-Mail: RICH.BEGGS@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 064

The Long Beach, the first nuclear powered surface ship in the navy, and the only nuclear powered ship to ever visit the shipyard, was in Dry Dock 3. It had just come down from the Boston Navy Yard after being commissioned. I think it was 1960/61. We were in the dock taking some measurements of the hull to certify the measurements listed on the ship's docking plan. We were standing under the hull, taking a break, when a shipfitter told us we were standing right below the ship's nuclear reactor. We didn't need much motivation to complete our assignment and get the heck out of the dock. We found out later, that we were perfectly safe. None of us ever glowed in the dark.

Monday, May 9, 2016

From: RICHARD BEGGS
E-Mail: RICH.BEGGS@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 064

YOU ARE NOW BECAUSE OF WHAT YOU WERE WHEN A physiologist from the university of Colorado used this as his theme for a lecture I attended at the Rock Island Arsenal. He described the development of our character and values being influenced by our environment as children. However, he said they might also be greatly influenced by events as adults, such as military service. I witnessed one event and a man influenced by both.
Extra security was added during the Cuban Missile Crisis in 1961. The watch aboard ship required all civilian employees to display their badge when boarding the ship. Some even recorded the names, arrival/departure times in a log. On one occasion, my Foreman and I were boarding a Destroyer in Dry Dock two on a very rainy day.
The Officer of the Deck was standing at the end of the brow under a large umbrella. My Foreman, noted for his strict observance of the rules, asked the OD if this was a United States Naval Vessel. The OD, said" well its not the Staten Island Ferry". My foreman replied" your right, but its the only ship in the Navy with the OD standing watch under an umbrella. When we left the ship an hour later, the same OD was still there, without his umbrella.

Wednesday, May 4, 2016

From: Roger Nabors
E-Mail:
Shop: 56 and 99 shop

Just saw the obit for Bob Raneri. "BobBo was a great guy and a good supervisor before going to tank and void. I worked with him and for him and worked with him on 3rd shift when he was the Tank and Void coordinater. Hte to hear of his passing

April 27, 2016

From: Julio Casiano
E-Mail: Julio@Philly-Yardbird.com
Shop: 67964-026

To the person who wished to remain anonymous:

I don't want to know anything about him.  Just let the family know that someone is using his email address to troll.

Tuesday, April 26, 2016

From: Kevin Philpott
E-Mail: kpkevinphil@gmail.com
Shop: x38, C930.1

Could be someone in the hose using the computer.

April 25, 2016

From: Julio Casiano
E-Mail: Julio@Philly-Yardbird.com
Shop: 67964-026
 

I did an internet search of the troll's email address and came up with this.  I'm not sure of its accuracy but the results seem strange to me.  I could've paid for more detailed info, but the troll's not worth the twenty some odd bucks they wanted.  If you know this guy, please reach out to him.

Name:  Jerry J Moresi
Age:  66
Location:  Philadelphia, PA
Relatives:  Edna Moresi

April 23, 2016

From: Julio Casiano
E-Mail: Julio@Philly-Yardbird.com
Shop: 67964-026

I've deleted my previous message after learning someone is using Gerry Moresi's name to try and post inappropriate comments.

The troll's email address is: jerryblast@comcast.net

Friday, April 22, 2016

From: Kevin Philpott
E-Mail: kpkevinphil@gmail.com
Shop: x38, C930.1

Julio,I just checked with an old friend of mine from x57 shop. He tells me that Gerry Moresi died about five years ago. He was a x57 shop employee.

Friday, April 22, 2016

From: Ron Miller
E-Mail: ronfish2002@yahoo.com
Shop: X31

In October of 1982 I reported to 501 Building, a bundle of nerves, my first day on the job at the Yard. I will never forget being greeted with a warm smile and soothing words by Candy Meyers. She gave me my paperwork and made sure I knew where to go and whom to talk to, all the while being so very pleasant and cheerful. So sorry to hear of her passing. She was a great lady. My condolences to her family and friends.

Tuesday, April 19, 2016

From: Rich Coyle
E-Mail: richcoyle1985@gmail.com
Shop: 57

Ed Myers: I am very sorry to hear of Candy's passing. She was a wonderful woman and friend to many of us a PNSY. She was an outstanding professional on whom you could always count for solid counsel for staffing concerns. She will be missed...

Saturday, April 16, 2016

From: chalie lieb
E-Mail: chaslieb0@verizon.net
Shop: 26

Rest in peace Andy good welder good foreman Great guy

Thursday, April 14, 2016

From: Ed Myers
E-Mail: candimyers@comcast.net
Shop: 57 Shop

It is with much sorrow that I post this. On Tuesday April 12, Candy Myers my wife of 49 years passed away. Candy worked in building 501 as a staffing specialist from 1980 to the closing of the yard in Sept 95. During her time at the yard she worked with all the shops and had many friends. She enjoyed the 10th reunion on the USS New Jersey. Candy continued her government service at Aberdeen Proving Ground in Aberdeen Md and retired in Jan 2015.

Thursday, April 14, 2016

From: Tom Queenan
E-Mail: Tmquee@verizon.net
Shop: 26/231

Info for John Andersons x26 Foreman.
Funeral services will be Saturday,April,16th at 9:30 Am.
St Francis de Sales RC church,35 New Rd, Aston,Pa. 19014 ( ph.# 610-459-2203) Church website has directions

Tuesday, April 12, 2016

From: Tom Queenan
E-Mail: Tmquee@verizon.net
Shop: 26 /231

Just got word that John Anderson 26 shop supervisor/weldors passed away this morning after a struggle with cancer. No word on arrangements at this time,but I will post them when published

Thursday, April 7, 2016

From: Danny O'Kane
E-Mail: dannyboydpo@rcn.com
Shop: 11 Shop

In March of 1966 I started at PNSY as a shipfitter helper and worked in 541 bldg. . on pre-fabrication for new construction . At the time there were 5 new ships being built from the keel up , 3 LST'S , 1 AGC and 1 LPH . All were pre-fabricated " units " built mostly in 541 bldg., 57 bldg.,and outside on " Erie " bay which was between 541 and the sheet metal bldg. At the head of DD-4 and DD-5 were " F " and " G " slabs where units were also built . This was a great time to learn your trade , especially from the " old time " shipbuilders .
One of the ships I worked on was the USS BLUE RIDGE AGC-19 . She is now the LCC - 19 , Blue Ridge and here is some history about this ship built at the PHILADELPHIA NAVAL SHIPYARD .
A quote from Captain Kyle Higgins , C.O. of the BLUE RIDGE while the ship was in port at Columba , Sri Lanka , March 31,2016 , " She is 46 years young and she's got 30 more years left in her because of the work that is put into her every single day " .
The BLUE RIDGE is the Flag Ship of the U.S. 7th Fleet and has been forward deployed to Yokosuka , Japan for 36 years and is the oldest active U.S.Warship still in commission .
PHILADELPHIA PRIDE !!

Wednesday, April 6, 2016

From: G Evans
E-Mail: Gevans1054@verizon.net
Shop: 26 shop

Many a person from 57 and 541 bldgs. punched out their pay check instead of their time card, rushing to cash their check at 7th and Porter.

Monday, April 4, 2016

From: RICHARD BEGGS
E-Mail: RICH.BEGGS@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 064

There was another Brinks trucks at 7Th and Porter cashing checks

Sunday, April 3, 2016

From: G EVANS
E-Mail: GEVANS1054@VERIZON.COM
Shop: 26

Sam Bernard a great person. When he arrived from NY Ship he jump to the head of the class. He became a top P-1 pipe welder who worked third shift. Thanks Sam.

Sunday, April 3, 2016

From: Julio Casiano
E-Mail: Julio@Philly-Yardbird.com
Shop: 67964-026

I remember the foremen handing out checks at muster on Thursdays and half the gang being out on Fridays.  That check cashing truck that used to be outside the main gate got put out of business by direct deposit.

Sunday, April 3, 2016

From: RICHARD BEGGS
E-Mail: RICH.BEGGS@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 064

I saw an item in the history of the Saratoga that said 10 men were injured when a 1200# steam valve ruptured on June 17, 1928 during the Slep overhaul. I was on board that day, and never knew it happened. Does anyone remember?

Sunday, April 3, 2016

From: RICHARD BEGGS
E-Mail: RICH.BEGGS@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 064

Our shop buildings, as well as all others in the shipyard, were hooked up with a broadcast system. I remember, at lunch times, the bond drives. "Any Bonds today" I forget when the last time I heard that song.

Sunday, April 3, 2016

From: RICHARD BEGGS
E-Mail: RICH.BEGGS@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 064

At one time we got paid once a week with a paper check. Later it was changed to every two weeks. Then it was changed to direct deposit. We had one man in our shop who still received a paper check. He did not believe in banks, and could not have direct deposit.

Friday, April 1, 2016

From: Danny O'kane
E-Mail: dannyboydpo@rcn.com
Shop: 11 Shop

Just saw where Sam Bernard , 26 Shop welder passed away . Sam worked with us on the third shift . A true gentleman and one of the nicest guys I have ever worked with . When you were ready for a tack , Sam would say " Hit it Bernard " . R.I.P. Sam , a WWII Navy Veteran .
Service 11:30 am Saturday , April 2, 2016 at St. Mary's Episcopal Church , 703 Edward St. Chester , Pa. Viewing : 9:30 am to 11:30 am at the church . The obit was in Thursdays Daily Times .

Saturday, April 2, 2016

From: Raymond Haffelfinger
E-Mail: raym1207@aol.com
Shop: 56 shop, C/360 and Design

First met OB back when we worked on many ships together got to know him a little more each year, but you move from ship to ship and sometimes don"t see someone for a period of time, but each time we would meet he was still the same, raggedy-ass beard but always funny and friendly. When the 'yard closed didnt see him again until I was hired by the US Mint in 2000, soon as he saw me I got the big hug and he said to me "I was the reason you got hired". From that moment on we became good friends seeing him every day was half the experience up until I retired in 2013 he was the same,big raggedy-ass beard always ready to help you he would go out of his way to do so. I was supposed to go to his retirement party this Sunday 4/3, this is what saddens me the most. We all work for this one goal to enjoy it, and it's taken away from us in a second. Went to his viewing the other night and the amount of people attending was a testimony to him. Rest Well MY FRIEND you have touched us all.

Saturday, April 2, 2016

From: Brian Fraser
E-Mail: gbrianfraser@hotmail.com
Shop: 17

Gonz, So sorry to hear of the loss of your son.

Thursday, March 31, 2016

From: John Walls Jr. (Wallsy)
E-Mail: john.walls@fmglobal.com
Shop: X41 Boilermakers

Just saw on Fox news Tom O'Brien X11 Shop

http://www.courierpostonline.com/story/news/2016/03/31/warriors-watch-motorcyclist-killed/82431894/

Friday, April 1, 2016

From: G EVANS
E-Mail: GEVANS1054@VERIZON,NET
Shop: 26

Worst job on the subs. Repairs in the sanitary tanks. The crew empty the tanks at sea. Cleaners hot chemical them to some degree. Sand blasters did there thing. P&E, Inspectors look inside. Left was the Welders and Shipfitters. If you don't know the tans were small with baffles every two feet apart. Baffles had holes so you could pass thru. Only one person could fit in the tank at a time. Many times there was waste material left. When and if repairs were made, the painters would shoot paint inside. Shop 11 test gang tested for leaks. At last the tank was completed with very few people going inside.

Thursday, March 31, 2016

From: Big Mike Bower
E-Mail: bruddaboo71@msn.com
Shop: 26 Shop

Obie was one of the good guys. Rest in peace Brother.

Thursday, March 31, 2016

From: RICHARD BEGGS
E-Mail: RICH.BEGGS@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 064

I was surprised to learn, according to Google, that the first Naval flyers took off and landed on the Marine parade grounds.

Thursday, March 31, 2016

From: RICHARD BEGGS
E-Mail: RICH.BEGGS@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 064

We were in a ballast tank on a sub on the marine railway taking measurements to determine if the pressure hull of the sub was distorted due to pressures when submersed during its last cruise. It was a hot Saturday in August. The Chief Quarterman Shipfitter stuck his head into the tank, and said to his son, who he was giving a tour of the yard: "see these guys, that's what you'll be doing if you don't improve your grades". My mate said " yeah kid, go to college and when you graduate, you may get a job that pays as much your father. End of discussion.

Wednesday, March 30, 2016

From: Tom queenan
E-Mail: Tmquee@verizon.net
Shop: 26/231

George,
When you go to NAVSOURCE,check out the ships that were at the yard. Some were built there ,others were repaired. The history of some of these ships show them when they were being worked on at various yards around the country. I takes some doing ,but the navy yard is in a lot of those pictures,not as a lead story,but as a backdrop to those ships that served this country. Happy hunting.

Wednesday, March 30, 2016

From: george kepner
E-Mail: gek1986@yahoo.com
Shop: 051 62435

thank you Richard for the info about looking up articles about PNSY im always looking for articles about the yard . will never forget the brotherhood we had there . Sorry to hear about Obie he was a great guy always pleasant .

Wednesday, March 30, 2016

From: RICHARD BEGGS
E-Mail: RICH.BEGGS@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 064

Anyone working in the back channel must have seen the subs being hauled up, or down, on the Marine Railway. The carriage was raised or lowered by a large windlass and chains. Spent shot from sandblasting operations accumulated on the rails below the carriage and had to be washed down, at times, by 72 shop divers. On one occasion at which the carriage got stuck halfway down, the Warrant Officer Ship Supt, thought he had the solution. He let out about six feet of slack in the chains and hoped that a sudden jolt would break through the shot on the rails. It worked so well that the carriage shot out the six feet in one jolt, and we almost launched the sub without any water under the keel. This method was never tried again.

Wednesday, March 30, 2016

From: bill kelly
E-Mail: foghat11@comcast. net
Shop: 11 shop

Heard about OBIE Very sorry to hear this one. He was one of the good guys. Going to miss him. My condolences to his family.

Tuesday, March 29, 2016

From: RICHARD BEGGS
E-Mail: RICH.BEGGS@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 064

George: Try google- Phila navy Yard

Tuesday, March 29, 2016

From: Tom queenan
E-Mail: Tmquee@verizon.net
Shop: 26/231

Just have been informed that Tom O'Brien (Obie) from 11 shop passed away on March 27. Not sure of the details. He was a fun guy. Remember working with him on the flight deck of Sara and Forrestal. After the yard he went to work for the mint. Pretty sure he was still working when he passed. May God bless him.

Tuesday, March 29, 2016

From: Dennis Kaiser
E-Mail: dennis.kaiser@outlook.com
Shop: Code 911

I hate being the bearer of these Obituary's but I also want these folks remembered. Please add this notice to our Obituary section.


Thomas J. O'Brien III

Thomas J. O’Brien III, of Runnemede, Former PNSY Shop 11 Shipfitter passed away on March 27, 2016, at the age of 59.
Tom was a graduate of Camden County Vocational School, Class of 1975. After high school, he served in the U.S. Navy.

After he was discharged he went to work at the Philadelphia Naval Ship Yard, where he worked for over 10 years. He has worked for the U.S. Mint as a Material Maintenance Expeditor since 1995.

Tom was a member of the Runnemede VFW Post 3324, and the Warrior Watch Riders where he was known as “Obie.”

Husband of Evelyn (nee Booth). Father of Nali S. O’Brien and Rani R. O’Brien. Son of Thomas J. Obrien and the late Margaret (nee Skay). Brother of Margaret “Peggy” Mitchell, Joann (Ray)Schuman and Karen (Bob) Kling. Also survived by many nieces, nephews and friends.

Tom will be remembered for his loving and caring manner with everyone he came to know.

Mass of Christian Burial is 10 a.m. Friday at Christ Our Light RC Church, 402 Kings Highway North, Cherry Hill, NJ.

Visitation is Thursday evening 6 p.m.- 8 p.m. at the Lewis Funeral Home, Moorestown, NJ. Interment will be private.

Please No Flowers. Memorial contributions to Runnemede VFW Post 3324, 600 North Black Horse Pike, Runnemede, NJ, 08078.

Tuesday, March 29, 2016

From: Jim Williams
E-Mail: jhw0217@live.com
Shop: x56/07/PW

Looks like we have "Co-Plank Holders" here as Mr. Evans and Mr. Beggs have contributed alot of history about the yard. Sometimes I remember how different things were when I started in 02/66. It was
3:00-3:45 pm and the shop was quiet, all the employees had either washed up and changed, or just washed up and everybody was just standing at their work bench, some with their lunch boxes in their hands and waiting for the whistle, so I just jumped up on a work bench and sat their until somebody comes over and tells me that the "Quarterman" is walking down the middle of the shop, so get up and look busy. I couldn't believe it. A deaf and blind person coulda known that nobody was doing any work. I guess back then it was called "Respect" for supervision.

Monday, March 28, 2016

From: george
E-Mail: kepner
Shop: 051 62435

i have looked on the navsource site also but it seems to me it hard to find pictures of the pnsy

Friday, March 25, 2016

From: Tom Queenan
E-Mail: Tmquee@verizon.net
Shop: 26/c231

To Gerry Evans,
Thanks for the explanation of the time cards. When I was hired I assumed that time cards were issued IAW your hire date,but From your example I see that check numbers Had different significance at different times.
For those who are interested in navy history ( and the navy yard) goggle "NAVSOURCE". Tons of pics and films. I just got into it and explored some of the ships I worked on. Lots of pics of PNSY. The yard played an important part in history. Wish the city would have promoted it just a little bit more, we still might be open.

Saturday, March 26, 2016

From: RICHARD BEGGS
E-Mail: RICH.BEGGS@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 064

Chris: That instructor was Elmore Mills

Saturday, March 26, 2016

From: RICHARD BEGGS
E-Mail: RICH.BEGGS@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 064

Chris. It was Leroy Taylor. An undisciplined ex-marine, if that's possible.

Saturday, March 26, 2016

From: Chris Mason
E-Mail: masoncs@comcast.net
Shop: 064, C/251, NAVSHIPSO

Mr Beggs, who was the black Shipwright Apprentice instructor in the late 60's early 70's; I can't remember his name

Thursday, March 24, 2016

From: RICHARD BEGGS
E-Mail: RICH.BEGGS@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 064

The yard used to ship propellers made here to other Yards. Our shop had to build a wooden cradle on a railroad car to hold the prop during its travel. It used to take us about 3 days to build the cradle. One day a trucker came in with a low bow and a steel cradle and stowed the prop in about 2 hours. Progress.

Thursday, March 24, 2016

From: RICHARD BEGGS
E-Mail: RICH.BEGGS@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 064

Parking inside the yard was scarce, spaces going to supervisors and long time employees. I used to come to work on the old wooden trolley car number 20 that came right into the yard with a stop located that was near the Marine parade grounds. I was at the yard only a year (1952) when there was a bad fire in the battery well on the sub Requin, killing one and burning 25. On the river front the yard was overhauling escort carriers Monterey, Block Island, Cabot and Siboney. The migraine submarine program was started in DD 4. Later we got the Fram destroyer conversion program. WE even got the the Long beach the .only nuclear powered ship to ever come into the yard

Thursday, March 24, 2016

From: RICHARD BEGGS
E-Mail: RICH.BEGGS@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 064

The welders must remember the X-Map project in dry dock 4. The hull was 10 or 12 inches thick and welding those shell plate butts must have been fun. I think it was supposed to be some kind of mine sweeper.

Thursday, March 24, 2016

From: G EVANS
E-Mail: GEVAS1054@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 26

TOM,
After WW2, I was told new check numbers were issued. With the small employment in most shops they used the shop number as the lead.
With new people coming and going they had to go to the next higher number in the lead.
In 1952, they hired a large apprentice class and helpers in the structural shop. There was little work. The Shop tried to fine jobs for us to do. Pay day was every week. I got to sort the pay checks for the structural shop (not yet a Group). My story.

Thursday, March 24, 2016

From: RICHARD BEGGS
E-Mail: RICH.BEGGS@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 064

In 1951, the Navy Yard celebrated its 150th birthday in June. The yard looked a little different then. The battleships California and Tennessee were docked in dry 5. The Olympia was berthed along the sea wall of the Schuylkill river, the unfinished battleship - Hawaii was berthed in the back channel. Shipways 1 was where bldg. 1000 is now and was used as a sandblasting field. Shipways 2 and 3 were still in tact just west of bldg. 57. Check numbers first two digits indicated the shop. 64 shop did not exist. There were 4 different shops then - 61, 63,68 and 94. Shipwrights, joiners, boatbuilders and pattern makers. All combined latter into 64 shop, except the patternmakers who remained a separate shop.

Monday, March 21, 2016

From: Tom queenan
E-Mail: Tmquee@verizon.net
Shop: 26/231

Interesting history associated with check numbers. Question to G.Evans ? You state shop numbers came first ,but your examples do not reference 26 shop. Do not recall 27 shop or 15 shop. Were these shop numbers done away with? I started in 1978 and do not recall ever seeing these shop numbers. Love researching history of the yard,especially those who experienced first hand ,like Mr.Evans. Where's the " snake "
Silverstri when you need him.
 

Tuesday, March 22, 2016

From: RICHARD BEGGS
E-Mail: RICH.BEGGS@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 064

Started august 1, 1951, check number 61942, later changed to 19900-064

Tuesday, March 22, 2016

From: george kepner
E-Mail: gek1986@yahoo.com
Shop: 051-62435

sorry the hear about the loss of your son Rich .also glad to see others posting good things about the yard . and look forward to seeing some of the older yardbirds responses to their experiences . the last plank owner I remember was a guy named Charlie ? from 72 shop , but im sure he wasn't the last

Monday, March 21, 2016

From: Jerry Kane
E-Mail: Zuri29@Cox.net
Shop: 67, 273, 235, PERA

My check number was 57283-067. I believe my father's was 25028.

Monday, March 21, 2016

From: Jim Williams
E-Mail: jhw0217@live.com
Shop: x56/07/PW

Wow, I'm impressed, I'll bet you guys with those low numbers could really tell some stories from "back in the day", so now lets see who is the "Plank Holder" here on this site.
Who's the oldest?
Who had the most years working for the Govt. (including military service).

Monday, March 21, 2016

From: RICHARD BEGGS
E-Mail: RICH.BEGGS@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 064

Jim, my check number was 19900

Monday, March 21, 2016

From: G EVANS
E-Mail: GEVANS1054@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 26

Started 1952, check numbers started with the shop's number first. Continued to the next number if needed more on the lead. My first check number was 27933. Later changed to 15016.

Monday, March 21, 2016

From: Dennis Kaiser
E-Mail: dennis_kaiser@outlook.com
Shop: Code 911

Please add to the OBIT Page

Richard Gonzoph, Jr. Former PNSY Shop 11 Shipfitter and Code 231 Planner & Estimator.

AGE: 60 • Chesapeake, VA

Richard Gonzoph, Jr., 60, passed away on March 16, 2016. He was born in Camden, NJ and was raised in Morgan Village. His family later moved to National Park, NJ. Most currently, he resided in Chesapeake, VA.

He is survived by his loving wife of over 20 years, Doreen Gonzoph; his parents, Richard & Jean Gonzoph, Sr.; brother-in-law, Vincent Pietromartire; along with extended family and friends. Richard loved his wife and his mother and father very much.

He attended St. Joseph's High School in Camden. After attending Gloucester County College, he joined his father at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard (PNSY). Richard started his career as a Shipfitter repairing and modernizing the U.S. Naval Fleet. He went on to become a Planner & Estimator (Structural) prior to the PNSY closure. Subsequently, he leveraged his shipbuilding knowledge as the Head Planner & Estimator (Structural & Piping) at Ship Intermediate Maintenance Activity in Norfolk, VA. Richard received numerous awards and commendations, including "Supervisor of the Year," throughout his 38 year career with the U.S. Navy.

From the time he was young, Richard spent summers in Chincoteague, VA. Throughout the years he could be found entertaining his many friends and enjoying time on the water clamming, crabbing, fishing in the channel, and water skiing.

A memorial service will be held at Hollomon-Brown Funeral Home, Great Bridge Chapel in Chesapeake, VA on Tuesday, March 22, 2016, at 3 pm. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to a charity of your choice . Condolences may be offered to the family at www.hollo mon-brown.com.

Published in Courier-Post on Mar. 20, 2016

Saturday, March 19, 2016

From: Tony Reardon
E-Mail: gulfwinds7@aol.com
Shop: 11, C229

Rich G

So sorry to have just read about the loss of your son Richard. I will remember him in the Palm Sunday Mass tomorrow. Stay strong.

Saturday, March 19, 2016

From: Jim Williams
E-Mail: jhw0217@live.com
Shop: x56/07/PW

When I started in Feb. of 1966 the employees I worked with had check numbers from the 10,000's to 12,000's.
My check number was 44881.
Anybody have a lower one?
The Supt's secretary in 07 shop (Mary) knew every persons check number in 07 shop from memory.

Saturday, March 19, 2016

From: chuck amicone
E-Mail: eagle15230@comcast.net
Shop: 11-shop

Rich, sorry to hear of your family's loss. Your family is in our
thoughts and prayers.

Saturday, March 19, 2016

From: Bruce Lafferty
E-Mail: bwlafferty@yahoo.com
Shop: 17 & 920

Gonz,

I'm very sorry to hear the bad news, my condolences are with you and your family.

Friday, March 18, 2016

From: Bill Berry
E-Mail: bberry8470@aol.com
Shop: P&E

Dick
I am very sorry to hear of your loss.

Friday, March 18, 2016

From: Bob Skala
E-Mail: yardbird17@comcast.net
Shop: 17 Shop

Gonz
I am truly sorry to hear of the loss of you son Richard. Sending my condolences.

Friday, March 18, 2016

From: JACK BALKIR
E-Mail: jbalkir@gmail.com
Shop: Shop 51 / CODE 1200

Rich,

Please accept my most sincere condolences for the passing of your son Rich.

Wednesday, March 16, 2016

From: Chris Mason
E-Mail: masoncs@comcast.net
Shop: x64, NAVSHIPSO, PERA (CV)

Dick G. So sorry to hear about your son, he's in my prayers

Wednesday, March 16, 2016

From: Richard Gonzoph
E-Mail: gonzophdj@verizon.net
Shop: 17

This is to tell all 11 shop and planners that my son Richard has passed away. he died during a liver transplant operation on march 15 at vcu hospital.

Sunday, March 13, 2016

From: Joe DeKraft
E-Mail: Joedek@verizon.net
Shop: 17 Shop, C/265, C/244

Jimmy Broomall, I remember him as I worked with him after I got out of the Air Force, he was truly one of the nicest guys I ever worked with. We were both 17 shop guys but ended up in 07 shop for a while. We ended up helping to close up 77 High building which had been shut when NAEC moved to Lakehurst. It was a strange weird feeling for me as my Dad had worked many years in that building as a welder. I had walked through the building once or twice when it was up and running. Lots of guys working on benches banging away and machinery running. When I walked in to start the work to secure the building it gave me the creeps, as there was no guys, no banging, no machinery and even the work benches were gone. It felt like a twilight zone show. I had a good time working with Jimmy, as it turned out Jimmy's Dad was an 07 shop Quarterman, it's good to have connections! :-)

Friday, March 11, 2016

From: Kevin Philpott
E-Mail: kpkevinphil@gmail.com
Shop: 38 shop, C930.1

One more mummer, Bob Shannon from Quaker City

Friday, March 11, 2016

From: G EVANS
E-Mail: GEVANS1054@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 26

Work with Swede Hanson, DD#3 LPH3. He said he got paid by the game, $35.00 and never more than $75.00. I saw him pick up a 12x12 shoring timber about 12 feet long and carry under the ship. He could not wait for the crane. What do running backs make today. $$$$$$

Friday, March 11, 2016

From: G EVANS
E-Mail: GEVANS1054@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 26

The welders, fitters, ever Chipper Duke, had a coffee pot along the wall between A and B bay, south end. One morning the owl had crapped all over the area. A welder, Hanahan, was saying we got to move this spot. As he said this, "kuplunk" right in his coffee cup a rat's head. No coffee that day!

Friday, March 11, 2016

From: Dennis Kaiser
E-Mail: dennis_kaiser@outlook.com
Shop: Code 911

I was a 4th year apprentice when we reopened bldg. 541 to rebuild the Belknap. When I went up to the Mold Loft Template storage area, a great horned owl with a wing span of no les then 7 feet flew out from one of the shelves and through a broken window. I almost ruined my shorts it scared me so much. We found it dead a week later in its nesting area. Apparently it had eaten a poisoned rat or something and it also succumbed. What a beautiful Bird it was.

Thursday, March 10, 2016

From: george kepner
E-Mail: gek1986@yahoo.com
Shop: 62435 051

we also had a guy named Dennis Lenahan who was in Avalon string band for years with the Mummers

Thursday, March 10, 2016

From: george kepner
E-Mail: gek1986@yahoo.com
Shop: 62435 051

I remember I barn owl in 541 bldg. we did stress relief in the bldg. sometimes it was at the river end if I remember we saw it at night obviously

Thursday, March 10, 2016

From: RICHARD BEGGS
E-Mail: RICH.BEGGS@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 064

Does anyone remember Jim Broomall, the String Band Captain from 17 shop? How about Chipper Duke? Was there really a barn owl roosting high in B bay of bldg. 541?

Tuesday, March 8, 2016

From: RICHARD BEGGS

E-Mail: RICH.BEGGS@VERIZON.NET

Shop: 064

Every Navy Yard believed that they were the first to do certain operations. I visited 5 other Navy Yards during my career, and talked to my counterpart in each of them.  Each man showed me some operation that they claimed they had invented.  We had been doing the same thing at our Yard for a long time.  I know one thing we did do for the first time was train and certify a female docking officer - Lt Olga Stengle.

Tuesday, March 8, 2016

From: RICHARD BEGGS

E-Mail: RICH.BEGGS@VERIZON.NET

Shop: 064

Swede Hanson was a halfback and also the punter for the Eagles.  He held the record for the longest punt ever, for a long time. 

Tuesday, March 8, 2016

From: RICHARD BEGGS

E-Mail: RICH.BEGGS@VERIZON.NET

Shop: 064

One of our boatbuilders, Tom (Swede) Hanson played for Temple Univ and the Phila Eagles for 8 years.  He used to tell us of the early years of the NFl.  He said the team used to leave the locker room door open so kids could sneak in, until the coach (Bert Bell) caught them.  Swede was a big man with a tiny voice.  I remember when working in the boat shop one day, and swede and another man were installing planks on a whaleboat.  They were having trouble fitting one plank without success. After discarding several planks, the foreman, who was watching, asked "whos going to pay for that wasted lumber?"  I can still hear swede's little voice, saying "I believe you will".  The foreman just shook his head and left.

Monday, March 7, 2016

 From: Tom queenan

E-Mail: Tmquee@verizon.net

Shop: 26/c231

If I remember correctly ,hy 80 was brown, hy 100 purple( I think) .

I remember at one point the yard was sold hts steel that was mislabeled ( wrong color) and was installed on one of the ships that was being overhauled. If my memory is correct the navy inspected by taking samples and those plates that were installed had to be replaced. Not sure if it was prosecuted as fraud or lack of quality control.

Monday, March 7, 2016

From: Jim Williams

E-Mail: jhw0217@live.com

Shop: x56/07/PW

While working in Bldg. 16 (31 shop), I remember people alerting Jersey residents that the city had wage tax people in the yard and were arresting them for non payment, so all of the N.J. residents would sign off on annual leave and go home before they got there.

Monday, March 7, 2016

From: RICHARD BEGGS
E-Mail: RICH.BEGGS@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 064

We had two men who owed city wage tax who were arrested by the city police, held overnight and released. Both long time employees resigned rather than pay the tax.

Monday, March 7, 2016

From: RICHARD BEGGS
E-Mail: RICH.BEGGS@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 064

In 1975 the river froze shore to shore. The second shift was hanging staging on the hull of a ship at pier 4. I was disappointed, when I read the night letter of the second shift foreman, saying he failed to complete the job, and the reason was floating in the wash-up basin in the locker room. They had spent most of the shift breaking up the ice around a dozen ducks that had been frozen in the ice. One was now floating in the wash-up basin. The warm water melted the ice and the duck was now floating around, being fed bread . we turned the duck over to the SPCA.

Monday, March 7, 2016

From: RICHARD BEGGS
E-Mail: RICH.BEGGS@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 064

The local Carpenters union (1728) set up a program with the employee having a savings bond deducted from their pay, naming the financial secretary as co-owner. The union made a deal with the city to have all interest dropped if the employee agreed to this deal. About 100 men from 64 shop signed and avoided the extra interest.

Sunday, March 6, 2016

From: Julio Casiano
E-Mail: Julio@Philly-Yardbird.com
Shop: 67964-026

Didn't somebody go to jail over the wage tax protest?

I'd forgotten about the color codes for steel.

What were the colors for HY80 & HY100?

Sunday, March 6, 2016

From: Mike Bower
E-Mail: Bruddaboo71@msn.com
Shop: 26 Shop

Around 78 or 79, I was just about to join the "Non Residents Taxpayers Association" when, I think it was Gov. Florio, let Philly come to Jersey and take people's homes for non payment of the city wage tax. I signed up for the tax and paid what I owed and was not penalized. I didn't have to pay NJ State tax because I was paying city wage tax. Guys from PA had to pay wage tax and PA state tax I think.

Sunday, March 6, 2016

From: Danny O'Kane
E-Mail: dannyboydpo@rcn.com
Shop: 11 Shop

The Philadelphia City Wage Tax was always a thorn in the sides of many , especially those who lived outside of the City . There was a group of Jerseyites , back a few years , who rode the ferry over and back from National Park . Their argument was since the Yard didn't belong to the City but was a Federal Reservation and they never set foot on Philly soil . Therefore they did not use any of the services provided by the City , such as snow removal from the streets of the City , fire and police protection , etc .
You have heard the saying , " You can't fight City Hall " . Well Philly dug in and came up with this . The river would freeze over every now and then . Philadelphia maintained a tug boat for an ice breaker , therefore clearing a path for the ferry . So here we have a " service " provided at taxpayers expense for the safe passage for the workers from New Jersey .

Gotta' love 'em .

Saturday, March 5, 2016

From: Jim Yunker
E-Mail: yunkerjf@netzero.net
Shop: 67 Shop

I remember the Belknap and Sully the peanut man. I was the system mechanic for the transmitter room back aft. I think Sully used to come in once a week selling his peanuts. He comes in one day and sells us a bag (from his trench coat). There was me and Craig Stratton and John Smith from 67, George Loftus, Charlie White and Lil Ole Bill (Wilkerson, I believe) from 51 shop. Anyway, the door opens and we stuff the peanuts behind an electronics cabinet. In comes Bill Angst (some kind of guru, food, cleanliness or something). About that time my boss, Burt Dunbar comes in at the same time that Angst finds the peanuts. Since Dunbar is a Foreman, Angst hands him the bag of peanuts and tells him to get rid of them. Dunbar, who was a bit of a character, passes the bag around the room asking everybody if they want peanuts! Can't remember what Angst did or said, but the rest of us had a hard time holding back the laughter!! Correct me if Im wrong.

Saturday, March 5, 2016

From: Julio Casiano
E-Mail: Julio@Philly-Yardbird.com
Shop: 67964-026

Got a couple of emails concerning the 'Line Heating' procedure:

Julio,

It was called “Line Heating.” It could ONLY be used on Mild Steel (MS Color Coded Yellow @ the Yard) or High Tensile Steel (HTS Color Coded Green @ the Yard). It was and old procedure used in a different way. During New Construction after panels were welded, the area in between the stiffeners would lock up the stress from welding and concave. To fix it, there was some talented people who, with a Rose-Bud torch and a spray of water would heat to move the stress in the opposite direction and cool it quickly to lock it in and the panels would straighten out.

The Japanese used the same principle to heat and cool spots on the plates causing the plate to deform. If you did it correctly, you could bend a plate into a compound shape without heating up the entire plate, what we use to call “Furnacing Plates.” I don’t think we did much of it although I do remember Our guys straightened out the Rear door for an LPD we had built. After welding, it was racked and wouldn’t have sealed had it been installed on the ship. Jimmy Quinn’s guys from the furnace section (affectionately known as The Mills Brothers), worked on it using Line Heating methods, and straightened the door out. What a relief.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________

JULIO, COULD USE ON MS AND HTS ONLY. IF DONE RIGHT IT HAD NO EFFECT ON TENSILE STRENGTH.
WE USED IT ON CONSTRUCTION OF LPH’S TO SHRINKS DECKS. STILL USED IN BUILDING OF CARRIERS’ MEGA BLOCKS TO ALINE.

Friday, March 4, 2016

From: Julio Casiano
E-Mail: Julio@Philly-Yardbird.com
Shop: 67964-026

Anyone remember when the Japanese came to 11 shop to show us how to bend steel with heating torches?

I think they called it 'line bending' or 'heat line forming' or something like that.

It was the dumbest time consuming thing I ever saw.

Doesn't all that heat affect the tensile strength of the HY80?

Friday, March 4, 2016

From: RICHARD BEGGS
E-Mail: RICH.BEGGS@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 064

The cruiser was the Philadelphia, and it was given to Brazil, not Argentina, and not sunk in the Falklands war. That was another ship

Friday, March 4, 2016

From: george kepner
E-Mail: gek1986@yahoo.com
Shop: 051

I remember having the Japanese workers coming to work with the electricians at PNSY . forgot what ship it was but in my opinion they was superior workers even to our standards they all had to take their breaks together never left the ship except to go to the head and they all went at the same time . they ate their lunch onboard and never complained . what a great group of men and example they set. Jack Balker I think could remember this

Wednesday, March 2, 2016

From: RICHARD BEGGS
E-Mail: RICH.BEGGS@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 064

Does anyone remember the cruiser PENNSYLVANIA that was turned over to Argentina I worked on it, I forget the year, probably in the fifties. Like Danny O'Kane related about the Iranian destroyers being low in the water when they left. the Pennsylvania was too. Loaded down with appliances of all kinds. They were really a happy crew, mostly young. Sad to say it was later sunk with all hands, by the British during the Falklands war.

Tuesday, March 1, 2016

From: JACK BALKIR
E-Mail: jbalkir@gmail.com
Shop: 51 / Code 1200

SOCIAL SECURITY BENEFIT

If you were in active duty between January 1957 to December 31, 2001 you are qualified to higher Social Security payment. Up to $1,200 per year of earnings credited at the time of application which can make substantial difference in social security monthly payments upon your retirement.

You must bring your DD-214 to the Social Security office and you MUST ask for this benefit to receive it.

Social Security Website: http//www.ssa.gov/retire2/military.htm

This is not an automatic benefit, you MUST ask for it.

Please share this with your friends.

Thursday, February 25, 2016

From: Danny O'kane
E-Mail: dannyboydpo@rcn.com
Shop: 11 Shop

In the early '70s the Yard overhauled and modernized two older US NAVY destroyers for the Shah of Iran . Don't know the names of the destroyers when they were ours but Iran named them "BABR" and "PALANG " . While these ships were in the Yard they were manned by Iranian sailors who all bought older cars while they were stationed here . Mostly older Fords , Chevys and Plymouths . They had their own parking lot down by Pier 6 that was just for Iranian sailors . When the ships were finished and ready to head for home they stripped every one of their cars down to the frames . I mean windshields , doors , seats , bumpers , fenders , tires and any part they could carry on board . They made Turkey Vultures look like amateurs . I swear it looked like those ships were riding low in the water as they headed down the Delaware River .
Gotta' love 'em .

Tuesday, February 23, 2016

From: RICHARD BEGGS
E-Mail: RICH.BEGGS@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 064

That locker room was in Bldg 620 and it was almost impossible to get a locker there. It seemed that everyone in the yard already had a locker there. When slep started, forget it.

Tuesday, February 23, 2016

From: george
E-Mail: kepner
Shop: 051

does anyone remember remains of a body being found during the rebuilding of the USS Belknap . and yes I remember the locker I believe was in 620 bldg. that covered a false room . I was one of the few that got to work on the hammerhead crane on the roof replacing aircraft warning lights for the planes coming in Philadelphia international air port it was that tall of a structure . walking out to the end of the part of the crane and over looking the sites was awesome

Monday, February 22, 2016

From: Danny O'Kane
E-Mail: dannyboydpo@rcn.com
Shop: 11 Shop

Speaking about locker rooms , hear is one for the books .
The building between DD-4 and DD-5 , forgot the number of this building , had a huge locker room with rows and rows of lockers . It took us awhile to find this one locker that we had heard about but once we found it I had to crack up . Along this one row was a locker with the back of it cut out . Behind it was a space about 20' x 10' , sort of like a cave that was completely hidden from view by the row of lockers .
It was funny to stand at the end of the row and watch a guy walk up ,look around , open the locker and walk in and disappear .
Gotta' love it !!

Thursday, February 18, 2016

From: Jim Williams
E-Mail: jhw0217@live.com
Shop: x56/07/PW

While I in 07 shop a painter was sent out to one of the waterfront quarters along the river to paint the inside of a front door. The persons living there owned a white miniature poodle who kept sniffing around the painter, so "Pete" is painting the door and he inadvertently knocks over the paint can onto the rug, so he grabs the poodle, dips his paws into the paint and starts screaming about the dog. The lady comes into the room and scolds the dog and "Pete" got away with his clumsy error. We actually had to take our "safety shoes" off when entering the homes along the waterfront.

Thursday, February 18, 2016

From: RICHARD BEGGS
E-Mail: RICH.BEGGS@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 064

A safety shoe problem resolved
Our well fed Shipyard Commander issued a new instruction requiring each employee working in the CIA wear steel toed safety shoes. He neglected to realize that the Labor Dept. had recently ruled that all required safety equipment must be supplied by the employee. Thus the Shipyard Safety Shoe store was established. Employees were entitled to one pair of shoes a year. It became apparent after a few years, that it cost more in time off the job, than the price of the shoes. Of course, some employees had to make multiple trips to the store to satisfy his style and fit. The store closed and the price of the shoes were included in each employee's pay, once a year.

Tuesday, February 16, 2016

From: Danny O'Kane
E-Mail: dannyboydpo@rcn.com
Shop: 11 Shop

We had to have a car pool to get a sticker to get in the Yard in the early 60's . To say that we had some characters in our cars wouldn't begin to describe us . The Marines used to man the gates then and they were tough . You had to hold up your I. D. card for the Marine to see it . Forget who it was that was in the back seat but when the Marine looked in to better see the I.D. that was held up for him to better see it , the holder of the I.D. had a water pistol behind his card . Down went the card and up came the water pistol with a couple good squirts in the Marines face . Not a good idea because as we took off at a good clip the Marines were in their jeep and in hot pursuit . We headed for 88 lot , which used to be a coal field way back before our time and it wasn't completely paved . Summer time and as we were trying to find a spot to hide the car all you could see behind us was a cloud of black dust and some angry Marines .
Moral of the story , not a good idea to mess with America's Finest Gotta' love it .

Thursday, February 18, 2016

From: RICHARD BEGGS
E-Mail: RICH.BEGGS@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 064

An indifferent man
A shipwright, I will call "Lou" indicated his indifference to any conversation or project by inhaling on his ever present cigarette, placing the filter end into his ear, and exhaling the smoke. It was reported that when the Chief Quarterman read him the specifications and penalty at a disciplinary hearing, and asked if he had anything to say, he replied "I'm hungry and you are boring." and then did the thing with cigarette. The penalty proposed was demotion to WG-5. Before it could be effected, Lou suffered a lower back injury and retired on disability pension.

Wednesday, February 17, 2016

From: RICHARD BEGGS
E-Mail: RICH.BEGGS@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 064

The best hamburger ever.
One of the perks enjoyed by the supervisors of 64 shop at pier D was ground steak hamburgers on Wednesday, and seafood platters on Friday. This was due to the generosity of the submarine crews whose boats were undergoing overhaul. The crews always had an over abundance of food which they parlayed into getting a little more work done on their boats. One Wednesday, the man whose sole duty was to grind the steaks into patties, dropped the paper towels that he used to drain the steaks, into the grinder. The shop head said, after eating his burger, that it was the best he ever tasted. Paper towels were also included in the patties after that.

Wednesday, February 17, 2016

From: RICHARD BEGGS
E-Mail: RICH.BEGGS@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 064

I meet a driller of square holes.
I was an apprentice working on one of the migraine subs berthed at the seawall adjacent to the lift bridge in the back channel. I was counter boring holes through the teak battens. A driller from 11 shop would finish by drilling through the steel frame to complete the bolt hole. I was getting along with the driller, helping him when needed. A different driller arrived one morning, and I was warned not to call him by his nick name, which was square hole louey. We didn't have much to say to each other. A shipfitter working nearby greeted him by his nick name. It was like that old Abbott and Costella movie where the calm guy went nuts when heard the words "Coco Moko". The driller dropped his machine, took the pry board and chased the fitter off the sub. He returned after calming down and continued drilling round holes through the steel frames.

Tuesday, February 16, 2016

From: RICHARD BEGGS
E-Mail: RICH.BEGGS@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 064

The work float cruise
64 shop used work floats to erect staging on a ship's hull close to the water line. The work float was about 16 feet long and 8 feet wide, with a freeboard of only 12 inches. we were working on the Currituck, a sea plane tender on pier 5. We were trying to move the float around the stern to the pier side of the ship when the apprentice holding the line, dropped it. The outgoing tide's current took the float out into the river with Willie Manners, out little Scot journeyman, on it. We got hold of the ship supt and he got the tug office to send a tug after willie. We could still see him as he passed pier 6, with his arms spread and jacket open, trying to create a sail to slow him down. The tug caught up with our float about a mile down river. Willie Manners had a great sense of humor, and it never failed him, even on this unplanned cruise.

Monday, February 15, 2016

From: RICHARD BEGGS
E-Mail: RICH.BEGGS@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 064

Our shop's bldg 177 served also as a locker room with about 100 lockers. The lockers were unregulated to the degree that some employees had two or three lockers. As the bldg manager, I was sorta responsible for the locker situation. I asked that each person with a locker, or lockers, hang a provided tag with name on their locker. One man asked to see me about this process. He was very upset and told me this process was a diabolical move devised by me to expose the fact that his third locker was used to stow marijuana that he dispensed to the Viet Nam vets who were suffering from PTSD. I told him that he had the right to file a grievance, listing his need for the third locker, and I would forward a copy to the Security Division. He gave up all three lockers when he resigned and moved up Broad Street to Temple Univ. to further his education and medication services.

Monday, February 15, 2016

From: RICHARD BEGGS
E-Mail: RICH.BEGGS@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 064

General George Patton allegedly once said that he did not want his troops to respect him, he wanted them to fear him. The young Turk crew on a sub at pier D being overhauled and turned over to them respected their Captain, but they really, really feared him. We had just completed installing teak deck battens on the deck, and a young Turk seaman was below the deck spraying black paint on the hull, framing and the underside of the teak battens. The captain came on board and was standing, talking to the seaman on watch at the foot of the brow. We watched as the overspray from below came up and coated two vertical stripes up the pant legs. The Captain never realized what just happened. He walked to the sail and into the conning tower. The seaman on watch knew what just happened, but knowing the difference between discretion and valor seemed to ignore it. The little Turk doing the spraying never knew how close he came to see the wrath of his Captain.

Monday, February 15, 2016

From: RICHARD BEGGS
E-Mail: RICH.BEGGS@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 064

One employee I remember, would I predicted, become either an inmate or a millionaire. He was an apprentice working for me who knew how to game the 45 day COP leave for recovery from on the job injuries. He used this at least once a year due to a lower back injury. I have to give him credit for his schemes. Once I received a copy of a letter, written to him from the Shipyard Commander, praising him for his outstanding recommendations for correcting the laxity of management in areas recognizing the inherent skills of employees. I was listed as receiving a copy. It was apparent that the letter was a forgery and I discarded it. He transferred to Hunter's Point Shipyard when he became a journeyman. Years letter I met a General Foreman for the former yard, and I asked if he knew this man. He rose quickly through the ranks there, he said, and when the Yard closed He got a job in Washington, DC at the Labor Dept dealing with waste, fraud and abuse in alleged injury compensation cases.

Monday, February 15, 2016

From: Jim Williams
E-Mail: jhw0217@live.com
Shop: x56/07/PW

There was a guy in P.W., Bldg. 1, 2nd fl. who was the I.T. person for a while who boasted that he should bring in 37 bullets to eliminate the undesirables on the 2nd fl.......he was reported to the police and 2 police capt's came up to the 2nd fl. and told him to gather all his personal items and escorted him out of the yard telling him "not to return". He got a lawyer and received all of his back pay, but never returned to work.

Saturday, February 13, 2016

From: RICHARD BEGGS
E-Mail: RICH.BEGGS@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 064

No employer in the private sector requires its employees to swear an oath at their hiring. Only government employees, military inductees, elected officials and the President are required to swear to uphold and defend the Constitution of the United States. As such, employees at the Navy Yard were unique in their responsibilities and for their behavior. The Navy Yard was a quasi-military establishment. Its senior officials were Naval Officers. The conditions of employment and schedule of disciplinary offenses reflected a military standard. A few, overt insubordination and fighting carried a removal action for the first offense. I never witnessed a case of insubordination in my shop in 37 years. There was, however, one instance of two men who exchanged punches. Both were long time career employees with clean records. They were both fired and never returned to the Yard.
It was a case of carrying a joke too far.

Sunday, February 14, 2016

From: Danny O'Kane
E-Mail: dannyboydpo@rcn.com
Shop: 11 Shop

In 1966 we were working outside of 541 bldg. on " ERIE BAY " prefabricating units for new construction . This welder named Ricky , an older guy , comes up to me and says " Hold this bag for me kid , I'll get it later . Little while later up pulls the Naval Intelligence Officers and they put Ricky in their car and off they go . Later that afternoon , here comes Ricky for his bag that I had to look in while he was gone . It was loaded with quarters and little slips of paper that were not for playing bingo . Guess that's where the term " bagman " might have come from ?
Gotta' love it !!

Saturday, February 13, 2016

From: RICHARD BEGGS
E-Mail: RICH.BEGGS@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 064

There was the case in another shop that shows what happens when an adult acting like a school yard bully causes a serious reaction. The man who was the butt of the bully's taunts came to work with a 1911 .45 cal pistol to find the bully. Sadly he shot two innocent men before finding the bully. Humor is expected in the work place, as it is in tactical military situations. What humor is to one man, is deemed harassment to another. It is a tribute to the men who worked at the Yard that only one such event ever happened. Nearly everyone knew where the joke ended and harassment started. There is one contributor to this site from my own shop who found it funny to lift the cap off a man who was very sensitive about his baldness. It marked him in my opinion as not mature enough for a supervisory position.

Sunday, February 14, 2016

From: Tom Maiorano
E-Mail: tmaiorano1@verizon.net
Shop: 38 Shop

I'm pretty sure crazy George's last name was Greeves. He used to let out a screech of some kind every once in a while. A real character.

Thursday, February 11, 2016

From: Jim Williams
E-Mail: jhw0217@live.com
Shop: x56/07/PW

Wow, "Crazy George", what a character, I was actually there when the supervisor confronted him and the look on the supervisors face was frightening......lol. I think supervision just had it in for guys that looked like they smoked weed (nah), not George.

Friday, February 12, 2016

From: RICHARD BEGGS
E-Mail: RICH.BEGGS@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 064

I was hired as an apprentice in 1951. Two years later I was drafted near the end of the Korean War. Those two years at the Yard prepared me for an easy assimilation into the Army. There was no place I could have worked where I could have met so many men of different backgrounds and personalities. Our shop was made of mostly Scots, English and Irish, and returning vets from WW2. It was like an history lesson for me. One English guy was at the battle of Gallipoli in WW1, a real disaster for the English. There were two vets who were part of the biggest airborne attack in WW2 called Operation Market Garden that was another disaster. Another vet steered a landing craft on June 6, 1944 -DDay. It got hit and sunk after the troops got off. Another man had a brother on he Indianapolis, the ship that took the A bombs to Tinicum island, before it was sunk by a Jap sub. A good friend, Len Zeserman was in the first wave ashore at Iwo Jima. They are only the stories of those willing to talk about them. There were many more who wouldn't talk at all. This is what the yard was about. Men making history.

Friday, February 12, 2016

From: RICHARD BEGGS
E-Mail: RICH.BEGGS@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 064

How Chicken Coop Charlie got his nick name:
Charlie Elinsfeld, who was stationed at Schofield Barracks at Pearl Harbor on Dec 7, 1941, was a Shipwright in 61 shop (now 64 shop). There was a destroyer in DD 2 which just had a director removed. A cover was need to protect the compartment below from the weather. Charlie built, what he felt was an adequate cover. When The ship's captain saw it, he stormed into our shop and demanded that the daman chicken coop be removed from his ship. Charlie never lived down that name. He was known thereafter as "The Coop" and many guys never knew his real name.

Thursday, February 11, 2016

From: Chris Mason
E-Mail: masoncs@comcast.net
Shop: x64, Design C/251, PERA/CV, NAVSHIPSO

Yes, "Airplane Sammy" was Sammy Gadizano (spell ?). He carried a big radio, capable of receiving the radio traffic between pilots and tower and big earphones, in his tool bag and was almost always were he could see planes coming over the Yard. I never knew if he actually had any tools in that tool bag; even when he was in my gang

Thursday, February 11, 2016

From: Jim Williams
E-Mail: jhw0217@live.com
Shop: x56/07/PW

We had a "Shiney Shoes" in x56 shop too, in the early 70's, older Italian guy, white hair, always dressed nice with shiney shoes. Back then they were called "Pushers", kinda a "runner" for the F/L.

Thursday, February 11, 2016

From: Charlie Coombe
E-Mail: cjc145@gmail.com
Shop: 56

Mike Cherneky (Big Mike), Shop 41,PERA and Supship Portsmouth VA. passed away on Wednesday February 3, 2016.

He was a native of Philadelphia, PA.was a retired engineering technician for Norfolk Naval Shipyard.Work at Philadelphia Naval Shipyard from 1969 until Closing.
He is survived by his mother, Barbara G. Cherneky and a nephew, David Mathes of Philadelphia .
Sturtevant Funeral Home, Portsmouth Blvd. Chapel is in charge of arrangements.

Wednesday, February 10, 2016

From: Danny O'Kane
E-Mail: dannyboydpo@rcn.com
Shop: 11 Shop

Never forget the day on the USS ALBANY back in the early '70s . We had a job in the CIC and 51 shop was pulling cables thru the area . That can be a tough job especially if you are not getting help from your gang . This young 51 shop guy was just sitting on top of a console doing nothing while the rest of the gang were working . Shiney Shoes asked him in a nice way to lend a hand . This guy tells Shiney Shoes to go to hell and a few choice words to go with that . Shiney Shoes walks over to him and asked him again . This time the guy gets real nasty , still sitting on top of the console . Before you could blink an eye , Shiney Shoes snatches him by the neck and rips him right off the console . Last I saw , the guy was breaking his butt pulling cable .
'Ya gotta' love it !!

Wednesday, February 10, 2016

From: George Kepner
E-Mail: gek1986@yahoo.com
Shop: 051

yes we had Shiney Shoes always had to have shiney shoes in 051 shop . how about some of the unique jobs we did . how many remember working on the U S S Kennedy . the Kennedy Stateroom was preserved and we could not disturb anything in it , but some of our work involved running wire thru the Stateroom . it was like a museum in a small sense . 67 shop had the clock specialist could fix any clock or watch it was assume to see some of his work .

Wednesday, February 10, 2016

From: jerry moresi
E-Mail: jerryblast@comcast.net
Shop: 57

Airplane Sammy was Sammy Godizano, if I remember correctly. The funny story about Shiny Shoes was the day I was working next to him and he always carried the bible and was very religious. I was putting glue between the seam of some rubber insulation and a glob of it dripped right onto the front of his "shiny" shoes. He went off on me and used every curse word in the book. My partner, Bob Dewees, laughed so hard and he never forgot it. I believe Shiny Shoes was John Mangarancina. He was a good guy though.

Tuesday, February 9, 2016

From: Jerry Kane
E-Mail: Zuri29@Cox.net
Shop: 67, 273, 235, PERA

We called the airplane guy "64 shop Sammy", what about X51's Shiney Shoes or the 2 shipfitters that would tag "Squirrel" and "Fox". In 67 shop we had Crazy George, a leadingman from another shop threatened to turn him in one day and George's response was "Turn me into what---- a frog?"

Tuesday, February 9, 2016

From: mike miller
E-Mail:
Shop: 26

I thought Sammy was called flight deck Sam! Remember the rat and bear in 26 shop?

From: Danny O'Kane
E-Mail: dannyboydpo@rcn.com
Shop: 11 Shop

The ' preacher ' from 26 shop's name was , Mr. Walker .
He would sometimes set up his milk crate in 994 bldg. in the morning and commence to reading chapters from the Bible . When the first whistle would blow he would stop and put away the milk crate and get ready for work .
Good man .

Monday, February 8, 2016

From: RICHARD BEGGS
E-Mail: RICH.BEGGS@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 064

It was a bridge too far to expect our plane spotter to stay below deck when the first 747 jumbo jet landed at the airport. He knew it was coming and sure enough, he was up on deck to greet it.

Monday, February 8, 2016

From: Danny O'Kane
E-Mail: dannyboydpo@rcn.com
Shop: 11 Shop

We are on a roll now . Thanks George Kepner .
Here's a good one . Another 26 shop welder , on the Saratoga when she came in the first time wood take his coveralls off and have his navy dungarees on underneath and then get in the chow line for lunch . Crew was so large nobody knew he wasn't a crew member .
Gotta' love it !!

Monday, February 8, 2016

From: Jim Williams
E-Mail: jhw0217@live.com
Shop: x56/07/PW

Then there was the guy who use to preach the bible in the mess halls on the ships prior to morning muster......Mr. ???? x26 And "Plunger Louie", 07 shop, walked around all day with a plunger on his shoulder, not sure he knew which end to use.

Sunday, February 7, 2016

From: george kepner
E-Mail: gek1986@yahoo.com
Shop: 051

then 026 shop had Bong the welder . anyone who got to know him knew he was a great man to know and a good welder also. yes it was airplane Sammy that guided in the planes , remember him well .

Saturday, February 6, 2016

From: Pete Johnston
E-Mail: Peter.s.Johnston.civ@mail.mil
Shop: 56

Hello everyone, it's been maybe 4yrs since I've been on the site. Just found out about the passing of Mike McGeehan, I was shocked to hear it.
Mike was as swell guy, my prayers go out to him and his family...God bless you Mike.

Saturday, February 6, 2016

From: Tom queenan
E-Mail: Tmquee@verizon.net
Shop: 26/c231

The guy who used to direct aircraft from x64 ,we ( weldors) used to call him " airplane Sammy" as I recall. When we got the carrier program, he was in seventh heaven. He would somehow work his way up to the flight deck,and direct planes flying into Philly international. I don't think he ever lost a single aircraft.

Friday, February 5, 2016

From: Danny O'Kane
E-Mail: dannyboydpo@rcn.com
Shop: 11 Shop

I remember the little guy from 64 Shop who " brought the planes in " He never lost a single plane . Don't know how they made it in safely without him !! Working on the Saratoga ,up on the mast one day and up he comes to better land the planes . Funny thing , he would give hand and arm signals to bring this wing up or lower the other wing and damned if the plane wouldn't do it . From what he told us , his radio enabled him to hear the pilot but of course he could not communicate with the pilot or the tower .
He's probably the head of the Federal Aviation Administration by now .

Friday, February 5, 2016

From: Danny O'Kane
E-Mail: dannyboydpo@rcn.com
Shop: 11 Shop

Now I remember his nickname , " ENOLA GAY " ..

Friday, February 5, 2016

From: George Kepner
E-Mail: gek1986@yahoo.com
Shop: 051

thanks Danny O'Kane . I,m sure our paths crossed at the yard . some of the pranks that we pulled were crazy . I remember having my tool box welded to the ceiling during one of the overhauls . wasn't bad other than the blueprints and other burnables that burnt. some guy was known for asking if you wanted something for lunch out of his brown bag lunch and you grabbed his you know what he put thru the bottom of the bag . if he is on this cite im sure he remembers that . Christmas time was always nice we seemed like a big family .

Friday, February 5, 2016

From: RICHARD BEGGS
E-Mail: RICH.BEGGS@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 064

We had a guy in our shop who was a plane fanatic. He would signal all the planes landing . He finally went too far when we found him painting a stripe across pier 6 to guide the planes. He was taken in custody by the FBI at the airport once and released. He was still at the Yard when I retired. I guess he's still watching the planes land where ever he is.

Thursday, February 4, 2016

From: Danny O'Kane
E-Mail: dannyboydpo@rcn.com
Shop: 11 Shop

George Kepner , x 51 shop writes that it seems all we see on the site are obits . He's pretty much on target . Would be nice to hear some stories about life after The Yard . Weddings of family members , graduations , vacations enjoying retirement , etc.
There probably a lot of stories about everyday life that we can share with those we worked with , before it's too late .
I'll never forget the morning we ' mooned ' the ferry coming over from New Jersey . Working on third shift over on a Reserve Ship , we had to cut an access hole in one of the machinery shops shell. Outside was a small platform and one morning some riggers were outside on the platform with me . Don't remember whose idea it was , but we did 'moon' the incoming ferry loaded with happy yard birds . I don't think they could identify the suspects !!
Anyhow ,lets hear some of your stories about PNSY ..

Thursday, January 28, 2016

From: george kepner
E-Mail: gek1986@yahoo.com
Shop: 051

30 years ago wow was anyone else out there remember the challenger explosion . being on at trip to Jacksonville Florida . I forget what the trip was for but I was on the roof of the motel the Sea Turtle when the Challenger exploded . we thought the booster rockets were just being released . then we came down to the news of the death of the astronauts . a sad day in history .

Tuesday, January 19, 2016

From: george kepner
E-Mail: gek1986@yahoo.com
Shop: 051

where are some of the good stories of our shipyard workers finally getting to retire and enjoying life . looking at a lot of the comments they are obituaries . its sad to see them all go . so many great people I worked with i would like to reminisce the old times we shared there . well god bless . remembering the Belknap rebuild , the Scan , Lake , and Pride ship we had to bring out of the inactive ships to get supplies the troops , and all those Philly finishes . I have many great memories there so many different people many wanted to do their best and also those that got away with as little as possible. but all in all so many great experiences . well I finally got to retire a few years ago and enjoying winters in Florida .

Friday, January 15, 2016

From: Jim Williams
E-Mail: jhw0217@live.com
Shop: x56/07/PW

Sorry to hear about Tom, he was a good friend of mine while working in c/400 and had quite a sense of humor, but the Springfield Country Club is located at 400 W. Sproul Rd, Springfield Pa. 19064.

Thursday, January 14, 2016

From: Flo D'Avocato
E-Mail: fdavocato@comcast.net
Shop: c/302

It is with much sorrow that I post this. My good friend Tom Giblin, c/400 passed away unexpectedly on January 8, 2016.
There will be a celebration of life on January 19th 12noon to 3 PM at the Springfield Country Club,400 w. Springfield Rd. Springfield, Pa.
For those wishing to send condolences online: www.legacy.com/guestbook/delco

Flo
 

Sunday, January 10, 2016

From: Ron 'Garbage' Reeves
E-Mail: pnsy17shop@comcast.net
Shop: 17

A belated Merry Christmas, and a Happy New Year to all that I ever came in contact with, at my home away from home. WOW !! It's been 20 years since I heard the last whistle blow while waiting on Broad Street to be picked up. If I listen closely you can too, you may still hear it. God Bless ALL of you !!!!!

Wednesday, January 6, 2016

From: Mike Casasanto
E-Mail: mikeycas@verizon.net
Shop: 56 pipefitter

Regret to inform all of you of the passing of Mike McGeehan of 56 shop (pipefitter). Mike fought a battle with cancer the last few years and pass away last week. RIP my friend

Monday, December 28, 2015

From: Dennis Kaiser
E-Mail: dennis.kaiser@outlook.com
Shop: Code 911

For the OBIT Section

CELLI
DEBRA (Debbie)(nee Catrambone), December 23, 2015. Former PNSY Type Desk for Miscellaneous Projects. Most loving daughter of Dolores and the late Joseph Catrambone, loving sister of Vincent (Patty) Catrambone and Pidge (Frank) Sirolli, loving aunt of Dana (Eddie) Franklin, Joseph, Frankie and JoJo, loving companion of Tom Catalano and sadly missed by her beloved Bella. Relatives and friends are invited to her Memorial Mass Wednesday 9:30 to 10:30 A.M. at Infant Jesus Parish/St. John Vianney Church, 2901 Good Intent Rd., Deptford, NJ. Funeral Mass to begin 10:30 A.M. Interment private. VINCENT GANGEMI FUNERAL HOME INC.

Thursday, December 24, 2015

From: Tom Maiorano
E-Mail: tmaiorano1@verizon.net
Shop: 38shop

Back again to wish all my Shipyard brothers and sisters a very Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year.

Thursday, December 24, 2015

From: Danny O'Kane
E-Mail: dannyboydpo@rcn.com
Shop: 11 Shop


The third shift Christmas Party for 11 and 26 Shops won't be in the Rubber Shop this year .
OOPS !! There is no Rubber Shop any more !!
MERRY CHRISTMAS and A HAPPY and HEALTHY NEW YEAR TO ALL !!
GOD BLESS OUR TROOPS !!!

Thursday, December 24, 2015

From: Dennis Kaiser
E-Mail: dennis.kaiser@outlook.com
Shop: Code 911

I'd like to wish all the PNSY Alumni a Merry Christmas and a Happy and Healthy New Year. After more than 20 years, some of my fondest memories were with you.

Thursday, December 24, 2015

From: Dennis Kaiser
E-Mail: dennis.kaiser@outlook.com
Shop: Code 911

Sad News,
I found out last night that we have lost another YardBird. Debra (Debbie) Celli passed away yesterday morning after a two year battle with her health. Deb was assigned to the PNSY Type Desk. I have worked with her on many occasions and enjoyed her candor and professionalism. She will be missed.

Tuesday, December 22, 2015

From: JACK BALKIR
E-Mail: JBALKIR@GMAIL.COM
Shop: SHOP 51 / CODE 1200

WISHING TO MY FELLOW YARDBIRDS AND THEIR FAMILIES A VERY MERRY CHRISTMAS AND HAPPY NEW YEAR.

Monday, December 21, 2015

From: Chris Mason
E-Mail: masoncs@comcast.net
Shop: X64, 2900, PERA CV, Type Desk

Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year to all PNSY YardBirds and your Families

 

Monday, December 21, 2015

From: George Kepner
E-Mail: gek1986@yahoo.com
Shop: 051

hope everyone has a great holidays . finally spending a winter in florida everyone should do it at least once .

Wednesday, December 2, 2015

From: Ed Worff
E-Mail: edsw051@verizon.net
Shop: x51 Test Gang & C/365

Just wanted to pass along that Carl McLaughlin, formerly from PNSY 06 Shop passed away in Florida on Nov. 17th. Carl left the shipyard and moved to Maryland where he succeded me as Director at NAVSEA's Plant Equipment Support Office in Annapolis.

Thursday, November 26, 2015

From: robert presley, aka-kid-red
E-Mail: redpresley11@gmail.com
Shop: x38 2nd shift

I worked 2nd shift from 1989 until closing, worked for jt lassiter, tobey, schum, dunn, ray gray and wolfy. I just wanted to say HAPPY THANKSGIVING I think about the yard and all you guys often, I still work for navy in California and I often tell the guys storys about the yard and the caracters I worked with, I will never forget you guys, HAPPY HOLIDAYS, BLESS ALL YOU SLACKERS.

Wednesday, November 25, 2015

From: Danny O'Kane
E-Mail: dannyboydpo@rcn.com
Shop: 11 Shop


As Vince used to say ,, " How's it look for the weekend " ??

HAPPY THANKSGIVING !!!!

Wednesday, November 11, 2015

From: Tom Maiorano
E-Mail: tmaiorano1@verizon.net
Shop: 38 Shop

Happy Veteran's Day to all. Hope everyone is doing well these days.

Tuesday, November 10, 2015

From: Joe Shatzman
E-Mail: Ed11181@aol.com
Shop: 26

Gerry didn't think you or Johnny clean clothes ever worked the back channel.

Wednesday, November 4, 2015

From: Shawn Kelly
E-Mail: Keldude@hotmail.com
Shop: Rigger

Hello, my father, John Kelly worked there in the 80's and early 90's. He passed away over the weekend. I'm having trouble locating the guys he worked with. He loved the "yard" and the guys he worked with. Any and all help will be greatly appreciated. Thank you.

November 3, 2015

From: Erin Clark <erinmollyclark@gmail.com>

Good afternoon!

I'm a freelance journalist currently in the process of writing a historical article for the Philadelphia Evening Post. The article focuses on the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, its history, and the people that worked there. As you mention on your site, information on the Naval Shipyard is limited and I was very excited to stumble across your site. I'm reaching out to you in hopes that you, or someone you know, has a first hand account or story from the Naval Shipyard and would be willing to share with me. Please feel free to contact me by phone, 717-799-0108, or email if you have any questions.

All the best,

Erin Clark

Thursday, September 24, 2015

From: G. Evans
E-Mail: gevans1054@verison.net
Shop: Shop 26

Thanks Joe Garrett for the memories.  It gave you a sense of pride seeing the subs returning from the "river runs" flying the broom from high above the conning tower.

September 20, 2015

Hi

I am one of the many sub guys that have the greatest memories of the greatest overhaul yard for submarines that ever existed.

The back channel was a treasure trove of experts in the repair of subs. We went there for routine overhauls, repairs after some event that we couldn’t discuss or batteries. Each and every trip was exciting. We lived in building 419 while our home was put back in shape. We all had belt buckles that named our boat and had dolphins on them. They were made for us by an un-named man in engraving and brought them to us in the mess hall a few days after they were requested.

A great number of us brought Philadelphia brides back to New London, or Charleston or Norfolk after an overhaul(myself included) finest wife resided at 6th and Dickenson before re-locating to New London. The workers at pier D were the craftsmen who took great pride in taking apart, repairing and putting back together one of the most complicated pieces of machinery ever invented. We always looked forward to a vacation in Phila. , knowing we would return to the fleet with a boat that performed in a sterling manner. I was fortunate to do a few visits most on USS Hardhead SS 365, and even three years on the USS Hake SS 256 moored by the paint locker and was a training facility for reserves as well as taking thousands of visitors on tours daily.

I want to thank the “yardbirds” of Phila. For their work and also their friendship during my years 1958-1979.

Joe Garrett TMCM(SS) USN retired , Groton CT

Pictures are of both the USS Hake SS 256 and her replacement, USS Angler SS 240 and my favorite boat Hardhead and a few I thought you might like to have?

Tuesday, September 8, 2015

From: Tom McArdle
E-Mail: tommcardle1125@yahoo.com
Shop: x31, 093, c/232, Foundry/Prop Shop P&E

New e-mail address.  Finally called it a day after 39 yrs. Met and worked with many great guys

Friday, September 4, 2015

From: Mike miller
E-Mail: Mikemiller3325@gmail.com
Shop: 26 shop

Last week end for the summer hope every one is in good health for this labor day. Take care!

Thursday, September 3, 2015

From: JACK BALKIR
E-Mail: jbalkir@gmail.com
Shop: SHOP 51 / CODE 1200

Happy Labor Day to all my yard bird friends.

Wednesday, August 26, 2015

From: Ron 'Garbage' Reeves
E-Mail: pnsy17shop@comcast.net
Shop: 17

George and all concerned: NISMF does not allow civilians aboard the ships in back channel because of safety concerns. BBNJ should suffice for researcher.... Just think 14 September will mark 20 years since the last whistle blew at 4 o'clock... Next year will mark the anniversary of the closure. My how time flies !!!!!

Sunday, August 16, 2015

From: Danny O'Kane
E-Mail: dannyboydpo@rcn.com
Shop: 11 Shop

For the person looking for access to a decommissioned Navy ship ,look across the river . USS NEW JERSEY .

Friday, August 14, 2015

From: george kepner
E-Mail: gek1986@yahoo.com
Shop: 051

Julio I believe the department that operates the inactive ships would be able to help anyone looking to access the older ships that are inactive at Philadelphia yard now

August 13, 2015

Someone contacted me with this inquiry but doesn't want his company info posted.

If someone has an answer, email me and I will forward it to him.

"I am working on a research project that requires completely non-destructive access to the interior of a naval vessel.  Decommissioned or dry-docked is preferred.  Are any of the ships located at the PNSY accessible for such a purpose and if so whom should we contact."

Friday, July 3, 2015

From: Tom Maiorano
E-Mail: tmaiorano14@comcast.net
Shop: 38 Shop

Happy Birthday, America.

Wednesday, June 24, 2015

From: Ron Miller
E-Mail: ronfish2002@yahoo.com
Shop: 31 Shop

Check out the video on CNN.com or other websites of the new aircraft carrier Gerald R. Ford. Electromagnetic catapults instead of steam. Amazing.

Saturday, June 20, 2015

From: Dennis Kaiser
E-Mail: dennis_kaiser@outlook.com
Shop: Code 911

I regret to inform all of the Passing of:
Norman E. Gibson Jr. (A.K.A. YUSUF) on Sunday June 14, 2015 Norm was a former PNSY Supply Person and later NFPC Supply, Shipping /Receiving and Accesses Control Employee.
Norm was a good man and will be sorely missed.
Funeral Service will be held on Wednesday, June 24, 2015 at the Mitchum-Wilson Funeral Home, 1410 South 20th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19146. Viewing: 9:00 AM till 11:00 AM, Service: 11:00 AM.
Interment will be at Washington Crossing National Cemetery, Newtown PA

Thursday, June 18, 2015

From: charles coombe
E-Mail: cjc145@gmail.com
Shop: 56

Charlie Buck shop 51, P&E and Pera. Passed away on Sunday June 14, 2015

Charles D Buck III, 65, of The Villages, Florida passed away Sunday, June 14, 2015 at The Villages Regional Hospital, The Villages, Florida. He was the husband of Virginia Purtle Buck. He was born on July 8, 1949 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania a son of the late Charles and Roseanna Buck. He was a member of St. Vincent de Paul Catholic Church, The Villages, FL where he was an Extraordinary Minister. He was a member of the West Hemingway Social Club, the West Hemingway Mens Golf Group, The American Legion and Angels Blessing Small Christian group. The West Hemingway Mens Golfers Group’s has created the Charlie Buck and Jim Milligan Inspiration Award to recognize others in the neighborhood who are going though long and courageous battles with health issues as these two have done. Charles will be deeply missed by his wife, Virginia and son: Adam Buck of KY; daughter: Adrienne Buck of PA; step-son: Buell Steelman of OR; and step-daughter: Mary Lyons of VA. A Visitation will be held on Monday, June 22, 2015 from 3 -5 p.m. at the Hiers-Baxley Funeral Services, 1511 Buenos Aires Blvd., The Villages, FL 32159. A Mass will be held on Tuesday, 2 p.m. at St. Vincent de Paul Catholic Church, 5323 E County Road 462, Wildwood, FL 34785. Contributions in Charles’ memory should be sent to The Dr. Virginia Purtle & Charles Buck Music Scholarship Fund, Christopher Newport University, 1 Avenue of the Arts, Newport News, VA 23606 and would be greatly appreciated.

Friday, June 12, 2015

From: Ron 'Garbage Man' Reeves
E-Mail: pnsy17shop@comcast.net
Shop: 17

Saddened to see the passing of two GREAT Gentlemen, Tom, & Griffy....
Knew them to be great friends, and I shall miss them. Couldn't make the get together was out of town, but will make the REAL 20th of closing next year... Jack Balkir: The 'yard was decommissioned in 1996,not 1995 which was end of production. I was there, and have programs from it. I have a few left if anyone wants one get in touch with me....

Thursday, June 4, 2015

From: Tom Queenan
E-Mail: Tmquee@verizon.net
Shop: 26 shop/ code 231

26 shop GF Tom Kartachak passed away at home on May 27,2015.retired from the yard in 1986.
Services will be Sat.,June 6th at Notre Dame de Lourdes church,Michigan ave and Fairview Rd.,Swathmore ,Pa.further details can be found at James F. Knoetgen funeral home website.
Great man and supervisor.One of many that made the yard what it was.

Monday, May 25, 2015

From: george kepner
E-Mail: gek1986@yahoo.com
Shop: 051

just hoping all our veterans a great memorial day . thanks for your service.

Thursday, May 21, 2015

From: Bruce Lafferty
E-Mail: Bwlafferty@yahoo.com
Shop: Shop 17, Code 920 & 110

I was saddened to read about John Griffin and I appreciate that Joe posted the information. I first met John in 1969, when we were apprentices together in 11 Shop, eventually we were transferred to 17 Shop to complete our apprenticeships in 1973. As Joe succinctly stated in the post, John was a conscientious worker and all around good guy.

Wednesday, May 20, 2015

From: Joe DeKraft
E-Mail: joedek@verizon.net
Shop: 17 Shop, C/265, C/244

John F. Griffin 1944-2015

Age 70, of Drexel Hill, PA, passed away on May 17, 2015. Born in Philadelphia and raised in Drexel Hill, John graduated from Monsignor Bonner's Class of 1962. He was a member of the Air Force and served during the Vietnam Era. John was a history and train enthusiast. He enjoyed reliving his days in the Air Force. He loved discussing trains and history. The History Channel was his favorite channel. John was a proud member of the American Legion and the VFW and was a parishioner of St.
Andrew the Apostle in Drexel Hill.

He was preceded in death by his parents, John and Anne Marie Griffin.

John is survived by his loving wife of 41 years, Suzanne Coll Griffin, and three children, Shaun Griffin, Colleen Weber (Mike), and Shannon Griffin.

Visitation: Thursday evening from 7-9 pm at the Rigby Harting & Hagan Funeral Home. 15 E. Fourth St. Media, PA 19063.

Funeral Mass: 11:00 am Friday at St. Andrew the Apostle. 3500 School Lane, Drexel Hill, PA 19026.

Online condolences: www.haganfuneralhome.com

John Griffin was employed in the Sheet Metal (17) Shop as a mechanic and later in "F"
section as a Pickup & Layout man developing shop blue prints for production manufacturing.
John was promoted to Design's 265 Code dealing with HVAC & Piping Systems developing blue prints for different classes of ships to be overhauled both at PNSY and else where.
When the Navy Yard was slated for closure John then landed a job at General Dynamic's Electric Boat in Groton CT working on their CAD system until he retired.

John was a good friend, a conscientious worker and an all around good guy.

Joe DeKraft 17 Shop, C/265, C/244

Wednesday, May 20, 2015

From: Larry Schnepp
E-Mail: lawrence.p.schnepp@boeing.com
Shop: 56/P&E

Daniel J. Newberg 11 shop/P&E

Daniel J. Newberg of Gleolden, PA on may 16th 2015. Beloved husband of Theresa Newberg (nee D’Amore), Devoted Father of Daniel J. and Michael B. Newberg. Brother of Richard (Maryann) and Nathan (Connie), also survived by loving nieces and nephews. Daniel was a Cub Scout master of pack 44,a volunteer for the Glenolden youth club and swim club. He was a kind and caring friend to all who knew him. Relatives and friends are invited to attend his viewing Thursday morn 10 to 11a.m. at St. Gabriel’s Church, 233 Mohawk Ave., Norwood, PA 19074, funeral mass will begin at 11a.m. Interment is private.

Wednesday, May 13, 2015

From: JACK BALKIR
E-Mail: JBALKIR@GMAIL.COM
Shop: 51/CODE 1200

THERE WILL BE A SPRING HAPPY HOUR EVENT ON THURSDAY, JUNE 11, 2015 FROM 3 TO 7 PM AT XFINITY LIVE, PHILADELPHIA (NBC SPORTS ARENA) FOR ALL PNSY AND FEDERAL EMPLOYEES. THE DETAILS CAN BE FOUND AT www.pnsyreunion.com and Facebook (PNSY REUNION) ABOUT MENU, DIRECTIONS AND PARKING. I EMAILED THE DETAILS TO ALL PNSY REUNION MEMBERS WERE PREVIOUSLY REGISTERED WITH ME.

IN ADDITION TO THIS EVENT, WE WILL BE SHARING OUR MEMORIES DURING 20TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE PHILADELPHIA NAVAL SHIP YARD CLOSURE.

SEE YOU ALL JUNE 11.

Saturday, May 9, 2015

From: Bob Daley
E-Mail: hogdale@hotmail.com
Shop: 51

Any x yard birds living out here in So. Cal ? I was in 51 shop from 1979 to 1983. I moved out here to Orange County CA in 2001. Anyone one else out here?

Friday, May 8, 2015

From: JACK BALKIR
E-Mail: JBALKIR@GMAIL.COM
Shop: 51/1200

We are in the process of reserving Xfinity Center at South Philly for Federal Employees Happy Hour on Thursday, June 11, 2015 from 3 to 7 PM. As soon as we get our confirmation I will be back to announce it in reunion and PNSY websites. Stay tuned.

Wednesday, May 6, 2015

From: Renee (Denny) O'Hara
E-Mail: ohara.renee@gmail.com
Shop: 31/39/2900/DC

Hello Yardbirds,

Has anyone, especially any of the 31 shop folks, seen or heard from 31 shop GF Fred Haegle? A good friend from 31 is looking to catch up with him and is becoming concerned because there is just no news about him at all. I don't think the old posted email is valid.

Thanks in advance for emailing an update, (if anyone has a lead)! Looking forward to replies! Ron? Anyone?
 

Wednesday, May 6, 2015

From: Jerry Moresi
E-Mail:
Shop: 57 and supply

Very sorry to hear about the passing of Holly Fischer. Another nice person from NAVSSES passes away just like Tom Amato a few months ago. God does take good people.

Tuesday, May 5, 2015

From: Edward DiGiovanni Jr

E-Mail: edigiovanni@usa2net.net
Shop: 51 & IRO

Obituary

Edward J. DiGiovanni, Sr., was born & raised in Philadelphia before moving to NJ in the 60's. A former resident of Ventnor, Atlantic County, for more than 20 yrs. between the 60's and 80's, followed by Hilltop, NJ until just 3 yrs. ago. He was 91 & half years old - 9/20/1923 - 4/21/2015. He was a World War II Veteran who served with the US Army in the Pacific Islands and continued military service in the Army Reserves for more than 25 years. He retired at the rank of Master Sergeant. He was a career employee of the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard and retired as a Machine Parts Inspector in 1984. Eddie was a long time active member with both the American Legion, Post 281, Chews Landing, NJ & the Veterans of Foreign Wars, Post 7927, Blackwood, NJ.


Eddie was predeceased by and the last survivor of 6 children of Pasquale & Filamena DiGiovanni. A widower of 4 years to his loving wife Helen (nee Evangelista) to whom he was married to for over 64 years and their son Mark.

He is survived by his children Edward, Jr. and his wife Antoinette; David; Elaina Cincotti and her husband Joseph and Carla Librizzi, 13 Grandchildren and 13 Great-Grandchildren.


A viewing will be held on Saturday, May 2, 2015 at Boakes Funeral Home, 6050 Main St., Mays Landing, NJ from 10am-12pm. Followed by a Service and Military Honors at Holy Cross Cemetery Chapel, 5061 Harding Hwy. (Route 40), Mays Landing, NJ at 12:15pm.

Affiliations

 American Legion 

 United States Army Reserves 

 US Army 

 Veterans of Foreign Wars

Tuesday, May 5, 2015

From: Butch Sneade
E-Mail: Bsneade@comcast.net
Shop: Possibly my Grandfather's

Can anyone elaborate on this USN Navy Yard "Badge"? I found it in some of my mom's stuff and think it's her Dad Arthur Sykes. She'd be 91 this year so Arthur was probably at the Yard in the 20's or 30's.

I want Ed to paste in a pic of the ID but can't figure out how. Badge is an oval metallic thing with a pic and employee number on the front and USN Phila Navy Shipyard with an anchor on the back.
 

Friday, May 1, 2015

From: Jim Walker
E-Mail: walk38@ptd.net
Shop: Type Desk, X 41

Val was x 38,P&E ordnance planner ,Farm out Type Desk.Versatile musician, professional magician, Great husband and father and everyone's friend.

VALENTINE R. O'CONNOR Jr.

O'CONNOR

VALENTINE R. JR., April 25, 2015, age 83 years. Beloved husband of the late Margaret A. (nee Costello); devoted father of Mary, Valentine, Michael, Bernard and Kathleen Smith; also survived by 18 grandchildren and 7 great grandchildren. Relatives and friends are invited to Viewing Wednesday 7 to 9 P.M. and Thursday 8 to 9:15 A.M. HOLLEN FUNERAL HOME (T.J. Fluehr, F.D.), 3160 Grant Ave. (W. of Academy Rd.) Funeral Mass 10 A.M. St. Jerome Church. Interment St. Dominic Cemetery.

www.hollenfuneralhome.com
 

Tuesday, April 21, 2015

From: Michael Kavchok
E-Mail: michael.kavchok@verizon.net
Shop: 64

Dear Sir and/or Madam, I am interested if there are any archived photos of the graduating class of 1968 available somewhere? I was a Shipwright. Thanks!

Tuesday, April 7, 2015

From: Cliff Nash
E-Mail: pnsycliff@aol.com
Shop: 06

There is currently a survey on line at ssfairness.com to repeal the Social Security Offsets WEP & GPO. Anyone affected by these discrimitory offsets should fill it out

March 28, 2015

Hello,
My husband worked for the Navy Yard years ago in the 80's. His name is Richard Padulese, Sr. I just saw that you have an obituary page and even though Rick passed of brain cancer three years ago, I was hoping that if you posted it, someone would have a fond memory to share with me. Since I can't make any more memories with him, I treasure every one I get. We were together since I was 15 and Rick was 17. Together 43, and married 40. I will include the obit if you would like to use it, and I also found a cool picture of the Yard Birds coming off the Ferry in West Deptford, NJ, where we lived down the street from the river. Sincerely, Mrs. Richard Padulese, Sr.

Richard Padulese Sr.

AGE: 61 • West Deptford

Richard Padulese, Sr., of West Deptford, on March 22, 2012, at home surrounded by his beloved family. He was 61.

An incredible man with a big heart, Rick would do just about anything for anyone; however, his family was always paramount in his life. Some of his favorite things to do were to walk his grandson, Luke to the river, play hallway Football with Ricky & Tony, go camping or on a memorable vacation with his family. Rick was always on the go, if he wasn't working or spending time with his family, he would be working around the house. A talented guy, he could fix just about anything. He loved trips to Europe, coin collecting, metal detecting, finding bargains at yard sales, going on cruises, watching Gunsmoke and astronomy. Rick was scheduled to retire on April 1st from South Jersey Port Corporation, Camden, where he was employed for 11 years as a pipefitter and welder. A true family man who loved life, Rick will be missed sorely by all who knew him.

He is the beloved husband of 40 years and soul mate of Kathy Padulese (nee Laigaie); best friend and devoted father of Richard Padulese, Jr. & Jennifer and Anthony Padulese & Jamie; outstanding Pop Pop to Luke and Ellie; dear son of the late Frank and Margaret Padulese; loving brother of Robert, Ronald, Joyce and the late Frankie; special son-in-law of Catherine Kelly, whom he loved like a mom; also survived by many nieces, nephews, cousins, friends and cats Sam, Baby and the late Mr. Bones.

Relatives and friends are invited to attend his viewing Sunday 5-7 PM (which will conclude with a Time of Remembrance) and Monday 9-9:45 AM in the McGuinness Funeral Home, 34 Hunter St., Woodbury. Funeral Mass Monday 10:30 AM in Holy Angels Parish at St. Patrick RC Church, Woodbury. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions are requested to Animal Welfare Assoc., 509 Centennial Blvd., Voorhees, NJ 08043 or online at www.awanj.org. Tributes and memories may be shared at: www.mcgfuneral.com

Friday, March 27, 2015

From: Danny Bangert
E-Mail: dbang1024@aol.com
Shop: 38 shop

Hi to all you yardbirds hope all are enjoying life, and God bless all who passed. You had to work at the yard to understand how it was. The winters in dry dock OMG was it cold. Remember useing rosebuds to keep warm. And how about the xmas partys in the docks long way down to carry cases of beer. Who remembers the guy that directed planes in never crashed one. I had alot of great time and worked with some of the best mechanics ever even today I still do not see the skills I've seen at the yards. And worked with a great group of men. From the NAVY to working at the yard got me where I am today. I have worked at a few places after leaving the yard working as a millwright and I want to thank all the riggers I worked with and what I call real pipefitters.
When I talk about what we worked on its hard for others to believe.
wish I had a blindmans hogie. When the yard closed we lost one of the BEST schools ever to learn a craft. Best of luck to all. 38 shop the Bill Hartner gang.

Tuesday, March 17, 2015

From: Jim "Dusty" Barbour
E-Mail: jimbox51@aol.com
Shop: 51 shop

Just read some of the stories from the yard and the one about Stella.
Fell off the chair laughing my ass off! I really miss those days and all of my fellow Yardbirds! Hoisting one up to all past and present one St. Patty's day 2015!

Tuesday, March 17, 2015

From: Vito
E-Mail: Na
Shop: Tank / Void Trailer

Like it Was Yesterday , Tony Dee, x26 Fl coming into Tank / Void Trailer 0:730 Monday Morning saying , Ha! Vito How's it look for The Weekend.

Saturday, March 14, 2015

From: Jimmy Williams
E-Mail: JHW0217@live.com
Shop: x56,07,PW

All the funny stuff is great, but this is a true story:
While in Bldg. 694 on pier six, in the cafeteria getting a cup of coffee, some yardbird walks in, gets a coffee, looks around and asks Stella "do you have any sweet and low"?
Her response was (as she grabbed her crotch)  "I got some sweet and low for ya, right here!!!
Whata gal.

Friday, March 13, 2015

From: Ron "Garbage" Reeves
E-Mail: pnsy17shop@comcast.net
Shop: 17 Bldg. 669, 634 & 990

I think Tony's tales are all true, as I heard them. I remember all the tales Nacho would tell the sailors of whom he talked them into believing he could jump from the floor onto a workbench and he did it, and they were amazed........ I sure hope being this will be 20 years since we last knocked off work, that everyone that can attend the Reunion that Jack Balkir is putting on because, a lot of 'family' we all knew and loved is crossing the bar and this might be the last time for quite a lot of us. If you cannot attend, post a comment or something with a funny story or something. God Bless you All !!!!!!!

Friday, March 13, 2015

From: Tony Santini
E-Mail: apsantini@aol.com
Shop: IRO

Subj: True or False?

Yardbird stories from the past.

A Beneficial Suggestion was once submitted suggesting that management should post Safety Bulletins on the bathroom stalls since guys were always looking for something to read when they had to go in there to do their business.

There was an employee who would go out to his car every day during his lunch break, lift up the hood, and tell passer-byes that he had car trouble that morning. Turns out he was storing wine in the windshield washer fluid reservoir and would go out there with a straw.

There was an employee who would leave through the back gate every Friday with a wheelbarrow. When approached by the guard, he would show him a signed permission slip for one wheelbarrow.
Turns out, he was stealing wheel barrows.

An apprentice was sent to the Tool Room to pick up a left-handed wrench and a bucket of steam for a critical job and, actually came back to the job site with both.

A new hire in one of the offices actually paid a coworker $7.00 for a one-year subscription to the Beacon.

Tuesday, March 10, 2015

From: Dennis Kaiser
E-Mail:
Shop:

GEORGE P. YOST

Passed away on March 6, 2015. The former Head Engineer of Code 270 at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard. He was a Bronze Star and Purple Heart recipient. He is survived by Flora, his wife of 60 years. Father of Karyn Thomson, Roger and the late Keith Yost; also survived by 7 grand-children. Relatives and friends are invited to his Funeral Service Thursday 11:30 A.M. St. Paul's Reformed Episcopal Church, 800 Church Rd., Oreland; where freinds may call Thurs 10-11:15 A.M. Int. Washington Crossing Nat'l Cem. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions in George's name may be made to Abington Memorial Hospice, 2510 Maryland Rd., #250, Willow Grove, PA 19090.

Wednesday, February 25, 2015

From: bob rogers
E-Mail: bobrogers60@aol.com
Shop: 17

Thomas J. McNish, 71 of Ridley Twp, Folsom, PA, died Monday February 23, 2015 in his homeBorn in Bridgeport, CT, he was the son of the late John F and the late Eileen O'Malley McNish. Tom graduated from Technical High School Scranton, PA. He received many certificates of accomplishment for training in leadership, management and technical proficiency from Penn State, Drexel University and the US Navy.

 He served during the Vietnam War in the US Navy from 1962-1966. He was a resident of Folsom for the past 44 years coming from Scranton, PA.

 Tom gave 38 years of dedicated service to the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard particularly as lead Superintendent of the overhaul of the USS Forrestal. He was a proud member and former quartermaster of the American Legion Murray-Stuart Post 566 in Glenolden, PA. He was a member of Our Lady of Perpetual Help Church, Morton,PA  Tom was an avid hunter,fisherman, golf enthusiast and loved spending summers at Baylor’s Lake in Fleetville, PA  Survived by his wife: Regina (McManus) McNish,

 daughter: Carolyn McNish of Folsom, PA

 son: Thomas McNish of Brookhaven, PA

 sister: Mary Ellen McNish of Philadelphia, PA  Grandchildren, Cayden, Caitlyn, Cole  Funeral Mass Friday 11:00 am at Our Lady Of Perpetual Help Church, Amosland Road, Morton.

 Friends may call Thursday from 7-9pm and Friday from 9:30- 10:15 am at Kevin M. Lyons Funeral Service, 202 S. Chester Pk, Glenolden, PA.

 Burial Saints Peter & Paul Cemetery, Springfield.

 Memorial donations in Tom’s name may be made to Our Lady of Perpetual Help Church or American Legion Post 566 35 S. Glen Ave Glenolden, PA 19036  Online condolences and memories may be placed on www.lyonsfs.com

Wednesday, February 25, 2015

From: Dan Finnegan
E-Mail: finnegan1487@comcast.net
Shop: 011 shop

remembering all the great coworkers and awesome jobs I was involved with at PNSY. I miss the work and the people I worked with. I started in 1981 and was there at close in September 1995. Working carrier steam receivers and flight decks
 

Friday, February 13, 2015

From: Ron Miller
E-Mail: ronfish2002@yahoo.com
Shop: x31

9 degrees on the thermometer this morning. The Hawk be blowin' down the river.

February 10, 2015

From: Chris Murray <collingswoodcarpentry@gmail.com>

Hello Julio,
I'm a graduate student at Philadelphia University in the Sustainable Design program. For our spring studio were are doing a theoretical design of the historic corridor. We have been doing research into the history of the yard but it would be very valuable to speak to guys who worked there to get a better sense of the yard. I grew up in Collingswood but I think I'm one of the only ones in the area who doesn't have an uncle that worked there. If you or anyone of the alumni could speak with us and relate some stories I would appreciate it.

Thanks,
Chris

Tuesday, February 3, 2015

From: JACK BALKIR
E-Mail: JBALKIR@GMAIL.COM
Shop: 51 SHOP / CODE 1200

We are planning a PNSY Reunion Mix & Mingle type of gathering in Navy Yard (Old Officer's Club) in Spring/Summer 2015. Stay tuned for details and check our website www.pnsyreunion.com for additional info.

Monday, February 2, 2015

From: Tom Maiorano
E-Mail: tmaiorano14@comcast.net
Shop: 38 Shop

HOW 'BOUT THEM PATS??????????????????

Wednesday, January 21, 2015

From: tom mcnish
E-Mail: baylorr@rcnn.com
Shop: 56 shop/ public works

JACKIE
What are some of your questions? I will try to help.

January 20, 2015

Hi Julio,

I'm a graduate architecture student at the University of Pennsylvania working on a thesis this year with a site in the Navy Yard. Specifically, Langley Ave and the the cluster of industrial buildings at the west end of the road. I was wondering if you could direct me to anyone who would know more about that part of the Navy Yard and particularly the history of the buildings and rail line that ran down the center of that street. I'd appreciate any assistance you can give.

Thanks so much!
Jackie

--

Jackie Martinez
MARCH+MLA University of Pennsylvania
martinez.jackieann@gmail.com
440.371.4502

Saturday, January 10, 2015

From: Raymond w Smith Jr.
E-Mail: hooraysmith54@gmail
Shop: 51 shop forman

Happy new year all my shipyard friends miss you all I am here in Texas.

January 9, 2015

I have a poem about all the trades at the Philly Naval Shipyard during WWII. It is from a WWII novel I am writing that has many scenes set in the Philly Navy yard.

Ron Gottardi, Volunteer Director, Battleship New Jersey Oral History Program
BB-62: Tel: 866-877-6262, x222; email: oralhistory@battleshipnewjersey.org
Pers: Tel: 856-608-7984; email: rongo620@yahoo.com

Monday, January 5, 2015

From: Renee (Denny) O'Hara
E-Mail: ohara.renee@gmail.com
Shop: 31, 39, 2900

Happy New Year wishes to all!

How was this year's reunion? Did anyone get pictures?

I will certainly be looking forward to making it up for this year's 20th PNSY reunion! I can't believe it's been 20 years. Should be a big showing this year, it's not too early to start talking it up!

Hope everyone had a wonderful holiday.

January 3, 2015

Levine Karen <karenlevine365@yahoo.com>:

My father worked at the Philadelphia Navy Yard designing battleships around 1939-41. I do have a paper from the PNY indicating he worked there, but this paper is somewhere in my home along with many other 'important' papers from long ago. I would love it if I could find out more about which ships he helped design and perhaps even see a picture of such a ship. It would be even more exciting to see his name as a signature or printed on any of the blueprints that he was involved with. His name is Harry Paul Taylor, b. 1914; d. 2004. My thanks to anyone who can at least give me information on how to research his employment at the Navy Yard.
Karen Levine

Friday, January 2, 2015

From: Dennis Kaiser
E-Mail: dennis.kaiser@outlook.com
Shop: Code 911

For the Obit section

Charles J. WRIGHT

Charles J., Sr. "Tank", Former Shop 17, “F” section Supervisor & Planner & Estimator At the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Passed on Dec. 22, 2014.

He was the beloved husband to Debra (nee Williams). Dearest father to Charles, Jr. (Dana) and Jennifer. Loving Pop Pop to Danielle and Andrew. He is survived by his siblings: Andrew Jr. "Bud" (Linda), Mary (John) McCurdy, Theresa (Bob) Kane, Denise (Bob Hanson) Wray and numerous nieces, nephews and cousins.

Monday, December 29, 2014

From: Paul Dixon
E-Mail: ptdix55@yahoo.com
Shop: 17 Shop , C/265.1

Sorry to hear of Charlie Wright's passing. Had I still lived in the area I would have been there!

Sunday, December 28, 2014

From: Ron 'Garbage' Reeves
E-Mail: pnsy17shop@comcast.net
Shop: 17

I was extremely disturbed that hardly NO ONE from our shop showed up for Charlie Wright's wake. There were 6 of us total!!! A very bad showing !!! All should be ashamed of themselves..........

Thursday, December 25, 2014

From: Ron "Garbage" Reeves
E-Mail: pnsy17shop@comcast.net
Shop: 17

It was a shock when Jack Balkir told me about Charlie Wright's passing.. He was as Bruce said, a GENTLEMAN !!! He always anticipated if there was anything wrong with his sketches in the field that something wouldn't fit, and he took that serious, and had a new piece made up if early in the day, and would have it for me that afternoon. Yep, he was a Good Man !!! I'll see everyone at the wake tomorrow. Merry Christmas to all my shipmates, and a Happy New Year !!! I'm gonna also put in a plug for Jack Balkir. As you all know 2015 marks 20 years since the 'yard closed, and If you do not do anything all next year, please please come to the reunion Jack's working on, as it might be one of the last times we'll see a lot of our family together. 'GARBO' !!!

Wednesday, December 24, 2014

From: Ron Miller
E-Mail: ronfish2002@yahoo.com
Shop: 31

Good tidings to you, Yardbirds, wherever you are.
I wish you a Merry Christmas, and a Happy, Healthy New Year.

Wednesday, December 24, 2014

From: Bruce Lafferty
E-Mail: Bwlafferty@yahoo.com
Shop: 17 and 920

I am saddened to hear about Charlie Wright. Charlie was a heck of a pickup and detail man and a good and fair supervisor. Charlie had a good sense of humor and I can't recall Charlie saying a harsh word about anyone.

Wednesday, December 24, 2014

From: Dennis Kaiser
E-Mail: dennis.kaiser@outlook.com
Shop: Code 911

Well we are in our 20th year since cease mission and I’d like to wish all my ex-yardbird Shop Mates, a MERRY CHRISTMAS and a HAPPY & HEALTHY NEW YEAR.

Stay Well,
Dennis Kaiser
(Code 911)

Wednesday, December 24, 2014

From: tom maiorano
E-Mail: tmaiorano14@comcast.net
Shop: 38 shop

It's that time again. I'd like to wish all my 38 shop brothers and sisters a Merry Christmas and a very Happy New Year.

Tuesday, December 23, 2014

From: JACK BALKIR
E-Mail: JBALKIR@GMAIL.COM
Shop: 51 SHOP, CODE 1200

CHARLIE WRIGHT (SHOP 17)

RUFFENACH FUNERAL HOME, 2237 S. 3RD STREET, PHILADELPHIA, PA 19148 VIEWING FRIDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2014 FROM 7-9 PM

OUR LADY OF MT. CARMEL CHURCH
2319 S. 3RD STREET, PHILADELPHIA, PA 19148
MASS: SATURDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2014 AT 9:30 AM

Tuesday, December 23, 2014

From: JACK BALKIR
E-Mail: JBALKIR@GMAIL.COM
Shop: SHOP 51, CODE 1200

MERRY CHRISTMAS AND HAPPY HOLIDAYS TO ALL MY YARDBIRD BUDDIES AND THEIR FAMILIES.

Tuesday, December 23, 2014

From: Jerry Maietti
E-Mail: jerry485@yahoo.com
Shop: 026 shop

I would like to wish all my fellow "Yardbirds" a Merry Christmas & a Happy, Healthy New Year. Many fond memories .

Monday, December 22, 2014

From: Ray Haffelfinger
E-Mail: raym1207@aol.com
Shop: 56/ C-360/ 262.3

Best years of my working life (16) @ PNSY, always remembered fondly having Christmas parties in what ever gang I was in, but most of all "Ironman's gang. Those memories never fade, each time heading over the bridge and look down and remember only GOOD TIMES,and RED cards on Friday's. Merry Christmas and a SAFE and HEALTHY New Year to ALL "Yardbirds" wherever you may be.

Friday, December 19, 2014

From: Rich Gonzoph
E-Mail: richard.gonzoph@navy.mil
Shop: 11,C/231

NNSY is hiring 1500 shipyard workers this coming year. Attached is the link from the Virginia Pilot.

http://hamptonroads.com/2014/12/naval-shipyard-hiring-1500-jobs-coming-year

Monday, December 1, 2014

The biography of a beloved Naval Officer, Dr. Harrison Miller Moseley is now available. UNBELIEVABLE can be purchased at Barnes & Noble.com. Miller died in September, but his story can now live on. Endorsed by President Jimmy Carter, former speaker of the house, Jim Wright, Winning TX Christian University football coach Gary Patterson and more. From the orphanage to the atomic bomb-his life was unbelievable.

Stella Brooks <sebrooks3@yahoo.com>

Saturday, November 22, 2014

From: Tim Horn
E-Mail: timothy.horn@yahoo.com
Shop: 99 Shop

Worked at PNSY from 1980 to 1985 in 99 Shop, mostly on 3rd shift. It was a great job and I worked with some of the best guys ever. I 'll never forget those days or my fellow shop mates.

Friday, November 21, 2014

From: bill bunn
E-Mail: bill.bunn@verizon.net
Shop: 41 shop

Can'nt believe that no Boilermakers are going to the reunion. Let me know who wants to go.

Monday, November 17, 2014

From: Danny O'Kane
E-Mail: dannyboydpo@rcn.com
Shop: 11 Shop

First ship I worked on in 1966 was the USS BLUE RIDGE LCC-19. Here's A little history of that ship .
Keel laid : 27 Feb.,1967
Launched : 4 Jan.,1969
Commissioned :14 Nov.,1970
Builder : Philadelphia Naval Shipyard
The BLUE RIDGE is currently the Command Ship for the Seventh Fleet and she is forward deployed to the US Fleet Activities, Yokosuka , Japan.
BLUE RIDGE is the oldest deployable warship of the US NAVY . BLUE RIDGE is expected to remain in service until 2039 .
Pretty remarkable when you think about other ships that have come and gone during the life of the BLUE RIDGE .
PHILADELPHIA NAVAL SHIPYARD , MAINSTAY OF THE FLEET !!!

Monday, November 17, 2014

From: Michael Volta
E-Mail: mavoltajr@hotmail.com
Shop: 38 Shop

Sorry to hear the passing of John Vukich 72 Shop Rigger, I worked along side John for many years in the back channel on submarines. He was a good guy easy to get a long with, he will be sadly missed.

Monday, November 17, 2014

From: Dennis Kaiser
E-Mail: dennis.kaiser@outlook.com
Shop: Shop 11

Where Are They Now
Recently Danny O’Kane submitted some pictures of 2 of the ships he had worked on during his career at PNSY. I was curious to see the status of those vessels today. Here is what I found on Wikipedia:

The USS Newport LST 1179:
Was decommissioned on 30 September 1992, at her homeport of NAB
Little Creek, Virginia. After several years in the Navy's
mothball facility in Philadelphia, she was sold to the Mexican
Navy.

Rechristened at Mexican Naval Shipyard Number 1 (ASTIMAR-1),
Tampico, Tamaulipas Mexico, as Mexican Navy Ship (ARM in Spanish)
Papaloapan (P-411).

In late 2005, the ARM Papaloapan (P-411) (former USS Newport)
answered the call of the United States once again, bringing aid
and supplies to citizens of Mississippi, who fell victim to
Hurricane Katrina.

In January 2010, she was deployed with 5000 tons of cargo in a
humanitarian mission to Haiti. In November 2012, she was sent to
Cuba with tons of supplies to help the victims of Hurricane Sandy.

The USS Blue Ridge:
Named for the Blue Ridge Mountains, is still in service in the US
Navy as of this date and is home ported in Yokosuka, Japan.

Tuesday, November 11, 2014

From: william j domzalski
E-Mail: rigger072@yahoo.com
Shop: 972

Sorry to report the passing of John Vukich.72 shop rigger. John passed on October 18,2014.John was a good friend, good person and great Rigger

Tuesday, November 11, 2014

From: Danny O'Kane
E-Mail: dannyboydpo@rcn.com
Shop: 11 Shop

HAPPY VETERANS DAY TO ALL FELLOW VETERANS !!!!!

Monday, November 10, 2014

From: Flo D'Avocato
E-Mail: fdavocato@comcast.net
Shop: C/960/302

HAPPY BIRTHDAY MARINES, SEMPER FI !

THANK YOU FOR YOUR SERVICE.

Friday, November 7, 2014

From: Bob Daley
E-Mail: hogdale@hotmail.com
Shop: 51

Hi Ron,
I don't think NASA would be interested in talking to us.

Friday, October 31, 2014

From: Ron Miller
E-Mail: ronfish2002@yahoo.com
Shop: 31

NASA could have asked any Yardbird about the advisability of using outside contractors.

Wednesday, October 29, 2014

From: coachdad1543@aol.com
E-Mail: coachdad1543@aol.com
Shop: 56

miss all the good people from the shipyard John Palmer

Monday, October 27, 2014

From: Bill Bunn
E-Mail: bill.bunn@verizon.net
Shop: 41 shop

Any of you Boilermakers going to the Reunion?

Thursday, October 23, 2014

From: Roger Nabors
E-Mail:
Shop: 99

Just thinking about the great times down the yard. Pinochle games on the 7 barge on 2nd shift , hanging scuppers, preserving rudders, and last but not least,diving 25 tanks on 3rd shift,ok,that was not so good

Sunday, October 19, 2014

From: Dennis Kaiser
E-Mail: dennis.kaiser@outlook.com
Shop: Shop 11


Albert J. Privito of Blackwood N.J. at the age of 93.
Passed away on October 16, 2014. Al was a Former Shipfitter (Shop 11) and Planner (Code 231). He worked in the Lay-Out section of shop 11 and eventually was promoted to the Planning section of the shipyard, Code 231. Mr. Privito was considered one of the "Good Guys" you got to share your career with.
He was the beloved husband of the late Dorothy M. (nee Leone). Devoted father of Mark Privito (Beverly), Margery Sharman (John), and Gina Mignogna (Chris). Devoted Grandfather Jaclyn, Jennifer, Nicole, Ashley, John, Dean and Samantha. Proud great-grandfather of Raymond and Rocco.
Relatives and friends are invited to attend his viewing Monday 8:30-10:00 am at the Egizi Funeral Home 119 Ganttown Rd., Washington Twp. Mass of Christian Burial 11:00 am at Our Lady of Hope Parish/St. Agnes RC Church, Blackwood. Interment, Woodbury Memorial Park, Woodbury. Condolences may be shared with the family at www.egizifuneral.com

 From: Dave Jillson <howardjillson@comcast.net>
Date: 10-17-2014
 

Dear Sir,

My name is Carie Ann Meyer. My father , John William Meyer worked at the Naval Yard in the late 70's and early 80's. He passed away in 1999. I am trying to gather any information on him that I can find.
To my knowledge he was a machinist and according to the 2 email posts I found on your site worked in shop 038---IAM-AW PMTC. GAPPING.
If any of your members have any information on him such as pictures or stories about him I would be extremely grateful.
This is coming from my boyfriend's email. Please respond back to this email address with any information.

Sincerely,
Carie Meyer

Friday, October 17, 2014

From: Jack Cleaver
E-Mail: jackcleaver@comcast.net
Shop: 72 Riggers & Safety Office

Greatest job that anyone could have ever had. Often still wish that it was still in operation. I probably would still be working there at, 78 years old. That was my home away from home for 28 Years. Made many friends and did a lot of travel time with co-workers and enjoyed every minute.

Thursday, October 16, 2014

From: Jack balkir
E-Mail: jbalkir@gmail.com
Shop: 51, Code 1212

PNSY Reunion and Christmas Party is scheduled for Saturday, December 13, 2014 from 5 to 8 PM at Vitor's Pub located at Camden Waterfront. For additional details visit Reunion Web Site www.pnsyreunion.com or email to:
pnsyreunion@pnsyreunion.com

Please give your full name and email address when you email us.

Hopefully see you all at the party.

Sunday, October 12, 2014

From: Danny O'Kane
E-Mail: dannyboydpo@rcn.com
Shop: 11 Shop

The USS INDIANAPOLIS was built at the New York Shipbuilding Corporation in Camden , New Jersey . Keel laid down on March 31 , 1930 . She was commissioned on November 15 , 1932 at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard .

Saturday, October 11, 2014

From: Leland W. Thorpe
E-Mail: msgtthorpe@aol.com
Shop: n/a

I am seeking any information pertaining to the USS Indianapolis. My brother, Everett Nathan Thorpe was aboard her when she sank. He was not a survivor. I will be forever thankful for any pictures, drawings or general information. Any cost associated with this request will be paid by me upon request. Thanks in advance!
Leland W. Thorpe, US Army Retired

Friday, October 3, 2014

From: John D'Aprile
E-Mail: johndaprile@gmail.com
Shop: X31,093,P&E

Funeral for joe borger Sat oct 4 (am to 11 Am 501 Easton rd Willow Grove PA 19090 Or go to wetzelandson.com and leave a comment.

Thursday, October 2, 2014

From: Leon Jones
E-Mail: ljones7@rcn.com
Shop: 41 Shop, C/385, Scheduling, NAVSHIPSO, DCMA

Obituary for Tom Amato, 41 Shop, C/385, and NAVSES. Tom was a great guy, great Boilermaker and “brickman!” Sympathies and condolences for a great Husband, and Father.


THOMAS P. AMATO, of Marlton, NJ, passed away on September 30, 2014. Tom was 63. Beloved husband of Jean (nee Hellwarth). Loving father of Nicholas and Gregory Amato, and Christine Venuto and her husband Joseph. Also survived by his mother, Cecelia Sacchetti Amato, sisters Mary Rush and Nancy Ambrogi and brother James Amato. Relatives and friends are invited to the viewing on Friday October 3rd from 6:00 - 9:00 P.M. at THE BRADLEY FUNERAL HOME, Route 73 and Evesham Road, Marlton N.J., 856-983-1005. Mass of Christian Burial will be 10:30 A.M. Saturday October 4th at St. Joan of Arc Church, 100 Willow Bend Rd., Marlton, NJ. Interment will be private at a later date. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made in Tom's name to: Mesothelioma and Pleural Program, Abramson Cancer Center, 3535 Market St., Suite 750, Phila., PA 19104, Attn: Natalie Reznik (make check payable to "The Trustees of University of Pennsylvania").

Thursday, October 2, 2014

From: Danny O'Kane
E-Mail: dannyboydpo@rcn.com
Shop: 11 Shop

Just bumped into Bill Cupples ,26 Shop . Haven't seen Bill in a long time and just wanted to let you know he is alive and well and attending daily mass at St. Gabriel's in Norwood . Good man .
Miss the old timers .
God Bless Our Troops !!!

Monday, September 29, 2014

From: John D'Aprile
E-Mail: johndaprile@gmail.com
Shop: X31,093,P&E

Sorry to inform you that Jim Borger x56, P&E, was killed at the Phila. Zoo today Sept. 29, look in the paper for the obituary. RIP Jim. GOOD GUY.

Monday, September 29, 2014

From: David Williams
E-Mail: tblkane@aol.com
Shop: 99 shop

Its Mr Wizard from 99 shop. Hope all is well. Had some great times. The dry dock was a place I will never forget.

Tuesday, September 23, 2014

From: Tony Santini
E-Mail: apsantini@aol.com
Shop: IRO

Happy New Year!
Okay ... so it’s just a new fiscal year but a good enough reason for a Happy Hour!)

Federal Employees(and friends!)
HAPPY New (Fiscal) Year Happy Hour!

Wednesday, October 1, 2014
5:00 pm to 8:00 pm
Xfinity Live! South Philadelphia
1100 Pattison Avenue
Philadelphia, PA 19148

On the deck at the Patio Bar (weather permitting).
If the weather doesn’t cooperate, we’ll take the event
indoors to the NBC Sports Arena.

Featuring…Three’s, Four’s and Five’s!
$3 Miller & Coors Lite; $4 Cocktails; $5 House Wines Free pizza (one pie for every ten in your group)
Get your co-workers together, invite your friends!
Table/menu service will be available at any of the venues within XFinity Live! Choose from among the Spectrum Grill, the Victory Club, PBR Bar & Grill and Bullies if you want to order food.
Xfinity Live is in walking distance of the AT&T Station of the Broad St. Subway.

Upon arrival, guests must obtain a wristband from the host/hostess at the NBC Sports Arena Stand by mentioning … “Federal Employees Happy Hour”

Thursday, September 18, 2014

From: John McMurtrie
E-Mail:
Shop:



Richie worked in 64 shop until the yard closed and then went to the VA

http://www.gardnerfuneralhome.com/fh/obituaries/obituary.cfm?o_id=2677279&fh_id=12431


Richard H. Nasuti Sr., on September 13, 2014, of Barrington. Age 61.

Beloved husband of Sharon (nee Mick). Devoted father of Richard H. Nasuti Jr. (Carol), Jamie Nasuti Huboky (Mike), and Michael Nasuti (Kristina Scala). Dear grandfather of Richard III, Vincent, and Camryn.

Brother of Natalie Cacciatore (Nick). Brother-in-law of Mike and Kim Mick. Uncle of Rita Cacciatore and Nicholas Cacciatore (Renata).

Also survived by many special friends, family, co-workers who have meant so much to him and our family.

Mr. Nasuti worked for the VA hospital in Philadelphia, PA.

Relatives and friends are invited to attend the viewing Thursday evening from 7 to 9pm and Friday morning 9:15 to 10:15am at GARDNER FUNERAL HOME, RUNNEMEDE.

Funeral Mass Friday morning 11am at Holy Child Parish, St. Teresa’s RC Church, Runnemede.

Entombment St. Joseph’s Mausoleum, Chews Landing.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in Mr. Nasuti’s name to the Prostate Cancer Foundation, 1250 Fourth Street, Santa Monica, CA 90401.

Family and friends may share memories at www.GardnerFuneralHome.com.

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

From: GERRY EVANS
E-Mail: GEVANS1054@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 26 SHOP

I heard it said, "If you were born an United States citizen, you hit the jack pot". I am proud to be a US citizen. I am proud to have worked for and served this great land.
I stated working at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard (Navy Yard) in 1952. I served my country 1955-1957. I returned to PNSY until 1989.
I will have been retired 25 years in September. Since 1952, I have not missed a days pay. I enjoy the benefit of seeing a large part of this country. Thank God for it all.
"GOD BLESS THE U S of A"

Monday, September 15, 2014

From: Tom Maiorano
E-Mail: tmaiorano14@comcast.net
Shop: 38 Shop

Well people, I can't believe it is nineteen years today that ship repair ended at our beloved PNSY. I still miss the place to this day.
I hope all of us are doing as well as we can after all these years.

Monday, September 15, 2014

From: richard beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 064

Stella Brooks: Try google. Navy times

Sat 9/13/2014

Could you please tell me if there is a monthly magazine or paper read by all military/military familes?

Is it mailed to the retirees?

If so, is it an all encompassing military paper and/or magazine or is it specific to each branch of the military.

For example, does the Navy have their own specific magazine/paper?

If there is a specific Navy paper/magazine could I have the name and contact information for each. As well as the name and contact information for a military (in general) paper or magazine?

I have finished the biography of a Naval hero and would like to speak with the editors.

Thank you,

Stella Brooks
817 312 3598

Thursday, August 14, 2014

From: Dennis Kaiser
E-Mail: dennis.kaiser@outlook.com
Shop: Shop 11

Joseph E. Wiegand

Former Shipfitter (Shop 11), Joe worked in the lay-out section of shop 11. Joe was a gentleman and a very hard worker. I found this notice looking for old co-workers and was saddened to find it. I wish I could have told his family what a nice man he was, but, they already knew that. Rest in peace Joe, it was an honor to have known you.


Jan.1, 2005; beloved husband of the late Patricia J. (nee Comley); loving father of Susan T. (Edward J. III) Fossett; and John J. (Diane); dear grandfather of Mark, Brooke, Jillian, Lauren, and Joanna; dear brother of Mildred Landis, William and Edward Wiegand. Relatives and friends are invited to attend his Viewing Thurs. 9 A.M. from THE EDWARD J. PETNER FUNERAL HOME (Family Owned and Operated), 6421 Frankford Ave. at Levick St. Mass of Christian Burial 11:15 A.M. St. Matthews Church. Int. St. Dominics Cem. No Viewing Wed. Eve. In lieu of flowers donations may be made in Joe's memory The Evangelical Manor, 8401 Roosevelt Blvd, Phila, Pa 19152

Tuesday, August 5, 2014

From: Vito
E-Mail:
Shop: X99 / Tank and Void

It's Di servio , man getting Old forgot how to Spell my Last Name , Take Care all you YardBirds , I'm going to CVS I'm out of Ben Gay !!!!!l
 

Sunday, August 3, 2014

From: Vito
E-Mail:
Shop: X99/ Tank And Void / Public Works

Just Read about  Chuck Caroll X99 Passed , some Guys Down the Yard you will never Forget , Chuck was one of Them, He Made your Day, If anyone Remembers me I'm on FaceBook , Anthony Disevio , my Real name!!!!!!!

From: Bob McMullen <bigmacusmc@yahoo.com>
Date: 07-11-2014
 

Hey Julio
It's sad to report that another brother has passed on 7/5/2014 Charles Carroll from 99 shop.
Smith's funeral home in Mantua, NJ
Bob McMullen

From: Joe Greco <jgreco23@comcast.net>
Date 06-23-2014

Sorry to report on the passing of Rich DeColli, a fellow Electrical/I&C designer from Design Division (Bldg 12) days. Rich was a lot of fun and was a good friend for a lot of years. He helped this squirt of a co-op when I first started and we shared a lot of great memories. Please keep his family in your prayers.

Still looking to hear from any of the old gang from Codes 270-275. Would love to share some stories.

Joe

Thursday, June 12, 2014

From: FRED CARCIFI
E-Mail: carcifi@gmail.com
Shop: 67

Hi folks....been a long time. Sure do miss those days or maybe it was just being young and living in a different time, (much, much better).

Hope to hear from some of you. I was in 67 shop from 73 to 84.
Now retired, living in Florida and still working as an independent Quality Field Engineer for major contractors.

Take care and God Bless you all.

Saturday, May 24, 2014

From: Danny O'Kane
E-Mail: dannyboydpo@rcn.com
Shop: 11 Shop

This Memorial Day weekend take time to pause and reflect on those who have given their all in defense of Freedom . Memorial Day allows us to remember our fallen Heroes who served this great nation . God Bless Our Troops !!
Danny O'Kane , USN .

Wednesday, May 21, 2014

From: Silvio
E-Mail: silvio.menna@navy.mil
Shop: 71

Really Brian? 41 years later and that's the one memory you have of PNSY? Do you think that is why they call it DOPE?

Tuesday, May 20, 2014

From: brian fraser
E-Mail: gbrianfraser@hotmail
Shop: 17

From August of 73 till December of that year several of us newbies sat behind 990 bldg. Getting smoked up. Since I stopped getting high almost 30 years ago I wondered why no one ever said anything about it to us.

Tuesday, May 20, 2014

From: Ron Miller
E-Mail: ronfish2002@yahoo.com
Shop: 31

Sorry to report the recent death of Hank Giordano of 31 Shop. Hank lived in Pennsauken NJ and retired from the US Mint last year.

Tuesday, May 13, 2014

From: John McMurtrie
E-Mail:
Shop: PNSY and Inactive Ships

Sad to report William Mebert from PNSY Design Divion and Inspection Manager for the contractor at Inactive Ships Maintenance Facility in Philly has passed on May 12.

Obit at
http://cavanaghfuneralhome.tributes.com/obituary/read/William-R.-Mebert-101349458 and click on obituary

Monday, May 5, 2014

From: Paul Dixon
E-Mail: ptdix55@yahoo.com
Shop: 17 Shop/Code 265.1

Ahhh Tommy Quinn. He was the first mechanic I ever worked with. We were on the "baby" brake press making a gazillion furniture hold-downs. He taught me a lot. His favorite expression..."I am to the brake press what penicillen is to the medical profession".

Monday, May 5, 2014

From: Joe DeKraft
E-Mail: joedek@verizon.net
Shop: 17, C/265.1, C/244

Bob, thanks for posting the information about Jimmy Vatis. I also felt like Bruce that Jim was a gentleman and really decent guy. I trained with Jimmy during my apprenticeship and worked just across the aisle from him for many years in the vent gang. He was old school, worked hard and did high quality work. Jimmy Vatis was definitely one of my favorite old timers. I figure he's up there shooting the breeze with Tommy Quinn about now.

Sunday, May 4, 2014

From: Ron "GARBAGE" Reeves
E-Mail: pnsy17shop@comcast.net
Shop: 17

I am deeply saddened to learn of the passing of Jim Vatis. He was one of the greatest pickup men in the shop, and also when he became a supervisor he excelled in his craft, and motivated his men. Soldier, stand at ease you have fought the battle and claimed victory in Christ Jesus.

Saturday, May 3, 2014

From: Paul Dixon
E-Mail: ptdix55@yahoo.com
Shop: 17 Shop & Code 265.1

I worked with Jimmy Vatis during my apprenticeship rotation up in Planning. Sorry to here of his passing.

Saturday, May 3, 2014

From: Bruce Lafferty
E-Mail: Bwlafferty@yahoo.com
Shop: 17 Shop

I appreciate that Bob posted the information on the passing away of Jim Vatis. Jim was a gentleman and true hero.

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

From: Bob Skala
E-Mail: yardbird17@comcast.net
Shop: 17 Shop

Jim Vatis age 92 years of Turnersville NJ passed away on April 25 2014. He worked at PNSY in 17 Shop & Shop Planning for 20 years. Jimmy was a World War II Veteran who was among the soldiers that stormed Omaha Beach, Normandy France on D-Day. Additional info can be found at mcgfuneral.com

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

From: Bob Ainsley
E-Mail: rainsley52@hotmail.com
Shop: Shop 71, P&E

Frank McCann worked at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Shop 64 Shipwright for over 30 years. Passed away Saturday April 26, 2014, Frank and Dot moved from NJ to The Villages Fl in 2009.Frank will be missed. Additional info can be obtained at hiers-baxley.com. Funeral Services

April 23, 2014

From: Joe Greco <jgreco23@comcast.net>

I was a co-op from Drexel and spent time at the Yard from 1969 to 1972, working in the Design Division, Code 270, in Building 12 (now owned and occupied by Urban Outfitters). I am currently working on the Navy Yard Energy Master Plan and the flood of memories I had when revisiting PNSY after 40 years were overwhelming. I interfaced with a lot of great guys in Bldg 12 and the other shops. I was wondering if anyone had word on some of the guys like Vic Crow, Charlie O'Donnell, George Conrad, Frank Gabrielli, Joe Kostick, Tom Kunik, Bob Scalisky and Steve Mazanek.

Urban has done a wonderful job refurbishing their buildings (3, 7, 10, 12,15, 25 and 543) and is working on others. But it would be a blast if someone had any pictures of the gang in Bldg. 12.

I was there during the last new construction projects (LST's 1179, 1180 and 1181 and an LPH) and recently saw the 1191 waiting for scrap. Made me feel rather old. But a lot is happening at the Yard and it will be a vibrant area when finally completed. I urge everyone to take a trip down there and see it.

Thanks!

Joe Greco
1969-1972

Monday, April 21, 2014

From: Jim Yunker
E-Mail: yunkerjf@netzero.net
Shop: Shop 67

Just read in the DELCO TIMES of the passing of Ted Mark. Ted was a former Radar Mechanic for 67 Shop

Saturday, April 19, 2014

From: Tom Varley
E-Mail:
Shop: 38 Shop

Sorry to hear of the passing of Joe (Bubba) Betz. He was a good guy and was a great boss when I worked for him.Always willing to help anyone who was in need.Joe you will be missed.

Saturday, April 19, 2014

From: John Trobaugh (sailor john)
E-Mail: jrtrobaugh@gmail.com
Shop: 038, 007

Here is a link to Joe Betz's obituary:
http://www.mundenfuneralhome.net/obits/obituary.php?id=465292

Online condolences:
http://www.mundenfuneralhome.net/obits/obituary.php?id=465292

Friday, April 18, 2014

From: John Trobaugh (sailor john)
E-Mail: jrtrobaugh@gmail.com
Shop: 038, 007

Joe Betz general foreman 038 passed away on 4/17 from a brain hemorrhage at home in North Carolina.

Friday, April 18, 2014

From: Tom Maiorano
E-Mail: tmaiorano14@comcast.net
Shop: 38 Shop

Just found out Joe Betz, former general foreman of 38 Shop passed away yesterday, April 17th. No other information is available at this time.

Friday, April 18, 2014

From: Jerry Maietti
E-Mail: jerry485@yahoo.com
Shop: 26 shop

Iam saddened to hear of the passing of Ed Trainor. A fine Gentleman, always smiling and always willing to help. Many Great Memories.

Friday, April 11, 2014

From: Ron 'Garbage' Reeves
E-Mail: pnsy17shop@comcast.net
Shop: 17

I too am saddened at the passing of Ed Trainor. Tom Q. has it right, Ed was a gentelman, and a good friend. We used to play cards in 634 at lunchtime, laugh, tell stories and have a good time. Rama Rama, Nacho, Bob Maffei, and other players enjoyed his company not talking any buisness but having a good time. He certainly will be missed, but he's home now and a seat has been saved for him. Play on Ed !!!!

Thursday, April 10, 2014

From: Jay Billups
E-Mail: jokersec@comcast.net
Shop: 26

So sorry to hear about Ed Trainor, such a nice man, good guy.

Wednesday, April 9, 2014

From: Tom Queenan
E-Mail: Tmquee@verizon.net
Shop: 26/c231

Sorry to hear about Ed Trainor.A true gentleman.Never saw Ed in a bad mood.He and many like him made working at the "yard" special.He will be missed.

Wednesday, April 9, 2014

From: GERRY EVANS
E-Mail: GEVANS1054@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 26 SHOP

SERVICES FOR ED TRAINOR
11 APRIL 2014-- HOLLEN FUNERAL,3160 GRANT AVE -- OFF OF ACADEMEY ROAD 6 PM TO 8 PM
12 APRIL 2014 --9:30 AM TO 11:00 AM

MASS ST JEROME RC CHURCH, 11:30 AM -- 8100 COLFAX ST. OFF OF HOLME AVE.

Tuesday, April 8, 2014

From: Gerry Evans
E-Mail: GEvans1054@verizon.net
Shop: 26 shop

ED TRAINOR, GENERAL FOREMAN WELDER, PASS AWAY TODAY. HE STRUGGLED WITH MESOTHELOMIA FOR OVER 6 MOMTHS.

HE STARTED AT THE SHIPYARD IN 1952, RETIRED IN 1988.

HE WORKED IN THE SUPPLY DEPT FOR 4 YEARS

A GREAT FRIEND. A GREAT GUY. KNOWNED FOR HIS CALMNESS.

ALL WILL MISS HIM.

 

April 8, 2014

From: Dennis Kaiser <dennis_kaiser@outlook.com>

TODAY APPROX. 330 PM ED TRAINOR, FORMER GENERAL FORMAN WELDER, PASSED AWAY.
 
HE STRUGGLED WITH MESOTHELIOMA FOR OVER 6 MONTHS. 
 
GOD BLESS.

April 2, 2014

From: Ronald Gottardi <rongo620@yahoo.com>

I have put together a proposal to build a diorama of the Philadelphia Navy Yard at its historic peak in 1942, enclosed in a museum with a gallery to honor the Yardbirds. More information is available at www.PNYdiorama.com. I have a presentation on the project which I can give at Yardbird reunions or other meetings. We are looking for volunteers and donations.  Please help us get the word out.

Thanks.

Ron Gottardi,

Volunteer Assistant Director of the Battleship New Jersey Oral History Program

Tel: 856-608-7984

rongo620@yahoo.com

 

 

Tuesday, April 1, 2014

From: Tony Santini
E-Mail: apsantini@aol.com
Shop: Personnel

A few years ago, I designed a T-Shirt in prepartion for the Shipyard's 15 year Reunion. The T-Shirt featured the PNSY emblem and could be customized to include your shop, your Yardbird nickname, or anything else you wanted to put on the shirt.

I know that a Planning Committee has been established to discuss options for our 20-year Shipyard Reunion and I will share any information I get in the future on that subject. In anticipation of that event, I thought that some of you might want to order a Shipyard shirt now. They also make great conversation starters when vacationing down the shore and, for the record, I do not get anything from any shorts purchased.

Here's the website: http://www.customink.com/designs/tonys/chg0-000g-48xc/retrieve?account_email=apsantini@aol.com&account_id=4344844&identify=true
 

Monday, March 31, 2014

From: Marc Hirschhorn
E-Mail: hatsoffusa1@gmail.com
Shop: no shop

I have some original hat patches for sale and thought that you may be interested in possibly purchasing them. These original hat patches are the same hat patches that you wore attached to the ball caps that you wore while serving on the ships.
The hat patches have a ships silhouette, just the ships name & hull no., crest, petty officers from E4, E7, E8 & E9.
I'm looking to sell them for $0.75 ea plus S&H.
I can send pictures/scans if you are interested in what I have.
Thank you for your time,
Marc Hirschhorn, USN RET.
Member of the USS FORRESTAL CVA-59 Association
 

Thursday, March 13, 2014

From: Danny O'Kane
E-Mail: dannyboydpo@rcn.com
Shop: 11 Shop

Small world we live in.I've been out of the yard for 25 years and haven't seen anyone that I used to work with while on third shift . My partner in crime on third shift , little Bobby Aspell passed away in the early 90's . We had some great times at the Yard and worked with a lot of good people .Great bunch of welders on third .
Checking out of Shop Rite and up walks this guy who says "you remember me " ? At first I didn't and he says " Big Marty ".Marty Mattus worked with us on third 25 years ago .Big Marty really does sell carpet used to be the way we talked .Nice guy and what are the chances of meeting after all this time .
Just wanted to share this with all .
Danny O'Kane Norwood , Pa .
God Bless Our Troops !!!

Tuesday, March 11, 2014

From: John D'Aprile
E-Mail: johndaprile@gmail.com
Shop: 31,093,c/232,227,284

Hello, to all the Yardbirds !

Friday, February 28, 2014

From: billy "D" omzalski
E-Mail: rigger072@comcast.net
Shop: 072

Funeral arrangements have been made for John (MOON) Mullen they are as follows:
Viewing at Burns Funeral Home
9708 Frankford ave
phila.,pa. 19114
8-10;15 am
11:00am Mass at
St.Katherine of Sienna
9700 Frankford ave
Phila.,Pa. 19114

Friday, February 28, 2014

From: richard beggs
E-Mail: rich.beggs@verizon.net
Shop: 61/64

COULD I ASK JOHN MATTESINI WHERE HE GOT THAT PICTURE OF 61 SHOP

Thursday, February 27, 2014

From: Bob Daley
E-Mail: hogdale@hotmail.com
Shop: 51

Sorry to hear about MOON he was a good guy.

Thursday, February 27, 2014

From: Billy "D" omzalski
E-Mail: rigger072@comcast.net
Shop: 072

I wanted you know John (MOON) Mullen died this afternoon he was 65 yrs died from complications after a knee replacement...details on his burial will follow

Friday, February 21, 2014

From: Mike Volta
E-Mail: mavoltajr@hotmail.com
Shop: 38 Shop

Sad to hear about Otto Leutz he was my first boss. I worked for Otto during most of my time in the shipyard. He will be missed, never be another Otto those who worked for him will know what I mean.

February 20, 2014

From: Mark Baugher <mark@mbaugher.com>

Hi Julio
Otto W. Leutz worked at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard for almost 30 years. Ott passed away on February 5th, 2014. I would like to post a notice on philly-yardbird.com, if this is appropriate. Please let me know.

Thanks, Mark
 

February 10, 2014

From:  'Stella Brooks' <sebrooks3@yahoo.com>

Julio,

Would you please post the following....


I am looking for contact information for the son or daughter of the late wwII hero, Melton Myron Truax. Truax field in Corpus Christie was named for MM Truax's heroism and numerous awards. His son is Frank w. Truax who at the time of death lived in Washington DC and his daughter's name and residence at the time of his death was Trudy R. Magill of Robstown.

If anyone has any contact information for either or both Frank and Trudy or their children, please call S. Brooks 817 312 3598

Thank you

Monday, February 3, 2014

From: Ron Miller
E-Mail: ronfish2002@yahoo.com
Shop: 31

I had a bout of nostalgia, reading in the Inquirer that the USS Forrestal will be towed out of the Yard on Tuesday, 2/4/14. Shop 31 apprentices were required to do a 3 month detail with 38 Shop "on the boats." My friend and fellow apprentice, the late Paul Muller and I were sent to work for Jimmy Barnes on the Forrestal flight deck. We started in October, and the weather was pretty nice. I thought it was pretty neat to be up there on the iron, free from the confines of the shop, installing the rails and catapault covers on #4, watching the planes land at the airport, working all the overtime you wanted, and having a birdseye view of the river and all that surrounded it. I remember eating lunch in a big tent down on the pier. Near the end of December it got very cold, but our time was almost up. I got sick over New Years and called Paul to ask him to bring my tool box back to the shop, and I would see him the next day. I'll never forget his call back that night. "Guess what Miller? They love us out there, and 31 Shop said they can keep us for another 3 months!" It got so cold that winter the river was full of ice. I had so many layers on under those white coveralls I could hardly walk. We huddled around those big 440 heaters or ducked into a conex to thaw out and have a coffee. When they shot the dead loads into the river, huge plumes of water and ice flew up into the frigid air. Finally it was time for the first sea trial, and there was no way a couple of 31 apprentices were going to get a slot, so Paul and I were sent back to the shop. Seems like we all have those unique Shipyard stories etched in our minds.

Friday, January 31, 2014

From: Jim Merkins
E-Mail: jj.merkins@comcast.net
Shop: 06/31/88/81

Tony Giordano..."The Big Ragoo" A little crazy at times but a heart that was as big as he lived. The Yard meant everything to Tony. Anyone that REALLY knew him understood that he would do anything for them. A true Yardbird and a true friend...RIP my friend!!

January 31, 2014

Hi,
I work for a online publication called Hidden City Philadelphia on a video series called My Favorite Place. I'm always looking for people to talk about a favorite place that other philadelphians might not know too much about. I was wondering if you (or someone you know) might be interested in presenting the Navy Yard as a Favorite Place.

I have included a few links to the other episodes of My Favorite Place so you can get a sense of what the video are like. As you'll see - some people know quite a bit about their favorite place's history and some people just shine a new light on a place that they really enjoy.

https://vimeo.com/42857532

https://vimeo.com/37637671

Please let me know if you are interested.

Meredith Nutting
301.801.0707
meredith@coolgoonproductions.com

Thursday, January 30, 2014

From: Jay Billups
E-Mail: jay.billups@navy.mil
Shop: 26

Tony Giordano retired Foundry Supervisor Anthony A. Giordano- Aug. 22, 1949 - Jan. 29, 2014


Viewing:

Pennsylvania Burial Co.
1327-29 S. Broad St.
Phila, PA
Monday Feb. 3 7-9 PM & Tuesday Feb. 4 8:30-9:30 AM

Funeral Mass:

Tuesday Feb. 4, 2014 10 AM
St. Nicholas of Tolentine Church
1718 S. 9th St.
Phila, PA

January 29, 2013

Julio,

It has been a year and I hope you are still in a position to post another request on the military website.

1.) On May 21, 1944 in HI ships heavily loaded with ammunition exploded killing and wounding many.
Where were the injured taken? How? By ship?

2.) The base in Corpus Chirstie TX was named after hero Melton Truax.
Does anyone have a picture or information regarding inaugeration day? Who was there? The date?

3) How and where can I find an individuals military records that shows/ notes all trips an officer made, where and when (relocations and short trips)?

Thank you!

I am searching for a contact information for Melton M. Truax's son, Frank W. Truax and/or daughter,
who at the time of Truax's death was Trudy R. Magill (if not divorced since this time).

Stella Brooks <sebrooks3@yahoo.com>

Wednesday, January 22, 2014

From: jim thomson
E-Mail: sherjen7@comcast.net
Shop: 56/38/03/code590

my friend FRANK KEPHART from 51 shop passed 1/21/14. what a great guy,friend and man !

Wednesday, January 15, 2014

From: Dennis Kaiser
E-Mail: dennis.kaiser@outlook.com
Shop: 11, c/250,39, HRO

My new E-Mail Address is: dennis.kaiser@outlook.com

Wednesday, January 8, 2014

From: Jim Walker
E-Mail: walk38@ptd.net
Shop: 41, Type desk

Early January, -6 degrees. It must be the day to work a yardarm or land an uptake.

Wednesday, January 8, 2014

From: Russell Griffith
E-Mail: Rgriffith@LCE.Com
Shop: Design C/272, 67 Shop, Combat C/365

Geez guys....are we all getting that old? I have @ 165 retirees from the yard and Navsses that I send updates to on changing benefits and those who have passed. It appears that "those who have passed" are winning! I'm dying (no pun intended) for some great news (kids married, new grandchildren, etc...) to pass along. We all have a long way to go yet. Hope you all had a wonderful holiday season.

Tuesday, January 7, 2014

From: Vito
E-Mail: Na
Shop: Tank and Void

The Bear What a Great Guy , never Will forget Him, I can still se Him and his Right Hand man Mike Malone, they made your Day RIP.

Wednesday, December 25, 2013

From: Jerry Maietti
E-Mail: Jerry485@yahoo.com
Shop: 26 shop

Just revisited the site & read about Dominick ( the Bear ). What a great guy & welder.
We worked many years together & had many laughs together. He will be sorely missed.

Wednesday, December 25, 2013

From: Ron Miller
E-Mail: ronfish2002@yahoo.com
Shop: 31

Good tidings to you, Yardbirds, where ever you are. I wish you a Merry Christmas, and a Happy, Healthy New Year.

Tuesday, December 24, 2013

From: Dennis Kaiser
E-Mail: den69125@hotmail.com
Shop: Shop 11

To all my friends and associates of the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard and the Naval Foundry and Propeller Center, I am hoping you all have a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year.

Tuesday, December 24, 2013

From: Tom Maiorano
E-Mail: tmaiorano14@comcast.net
Shop: 38 Shop

I'd like to wish all my Shipyard brothers and sisters a Merry Christmas and a very Happy New Year.

Sunday, December 22, 2013

From: Jim Merkins
E-Mail: jj.merkins@comcast.net
Shop: 06/31/81/88

Good luck Patty! Keep Ed working....Time with him, well.....Seriously, you were always a pro and working with you made us all better!!

Saturday, December 21, 2013

From: Dennis Kaiser
E-Mail: den69125_1@msn.com
Shop: Shop 11

One more PNSY Alumni has decided to retire after 40 ˝ years of service. Pat D’Amico (Nee Stewart) is retiring effective January 2014. Pat was the Administrative Officer, Code 302, back in the Shipyard. And is retiring as the HUMAN RESOURCES OFFICER at the OCHR Philadelphia Operations Center

Pat was recruited by then Captain Bergner to help with the monumental task of, while closing the shipyard, try to take care of as many employees as possible by whatever means possible. He moved Pat over to the Human Resources Office with John Conwell, and gave her card blanch to accomplish this task. The Career Transition Center was established. The rest is in the history books: $30 million in retraining money, 1,400 employees placed in PPP, 7,000 individual transition plan s for retraining, VSIPS, private sector jobs, unemployment compensation; relocation and housing assistance.

This is only a snippet of the accomplishments of this outstanding Civil Servant. But it was one of her many accomplishments that directly affected the employees of The Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, and I for one thank her for her service and her friendship. Good luck, with whatever you decide to do in retirement.

Friday, December 20, 2013

From: Joe Corda
E-Mail: jvcs127@hotmail.com
Shop: 026

Sorry to hear of Dominic Ferraiolo's passing. I worked a lot of overtime and shared a lot of laughs with "The Bear" on the Saratoga and Daniels. He was a helluva guy and a great welder. Rest in peace Bear.

Friday, December 20, 2013

From: JACK BALKIR
E-Mail: JBALKIR@GMAIL.COM
Shop: 51 SHOP/CODE 1200

On December 17, Flo D'Avocato's son Paul passed away. I am looking for funeral information for Paul.

Thursday, December 19, 2013

From: G EVANS
E-Mail: GEVANS1054@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 26 SHOP

Sorry to hear about Dominic Ferraoilo (THE BEAR). Great guy, great worker, Great Welder.

Tuesday, December 17, 2013

From: Jay Billups
E-Mail: jokersec@comcast.net
Shop: 026

FERRAIOLO
DOMINIC J. SR., Dec. 15, 2013. Beloved husband of Rita (nee DiTullio), devoted father of Dominic (Lizanne) Ferraiolo, Jr. and the late Alexander Ferraiolo, grandfather of Alex (Cristen), Gina, Alexis and Steven, great grandfather of Jovanna and Nylah, brother-in-law of Carmen (Ann) DiTullio and Frank Chiavrole; also survived by many nieces and nephews. Viewing Wednesday evening 7 to 9 P.M. from THE STOLFO FUNERAL HOME, 2536-38 S. Broad St. Also Viewing Thursday morning after 8 A.M. in the Funeral Home. Funeral Mass 9:30 A.M. in St. Monica Church, 17th and Ritner Sts. Interment SS. Peter and Paul Cemetery.
 

Friday, December 13, 2013

From: hank giordano
E-Mail: giordanohank@comcast.net
Shop: x31

happy holidays to all the yardbirds
 

From: SAOC West <saocwest@shaw.ca>
To:  Julio@Philly-Yardbird.com

11-21-2013
 

Hallo Julio & greetings from Canada ...

The Canadian Submarine Force Centenary occurs during 2014 & we're researching dates relevant to Argonaut's history ... later commissioned into the Canadian Navy as HMCS Rainbow SS75).

Argonaut underwent Fleet Snorkel conversion at Philadelphia Naval Shipyard during 1952 & would you be aware of an information source to confirm her 1952 in / out dates from the Yard ?

Yours Aye & Cheers,
Bob Emery (for SAOC West)
eMail or 250-727-0927
Victoria, BC

www.saocwest.ca

Friday, November 8, 2013

From: John W. Adcock
E-Mail: jadcock@epix.net
Shop: 72 Riggers

I was just browsing through the comments here and saw the obituary of Harry Ennis. I knew Mr. Ennis when I was an apprentice Rigger from 1968 to 1972. At one point he was my Foreman. I remember him as a very nice man to work for. I was 18 at the time. Rest in Peace Harry.

John

Tuesday, October 29, 2013

From: Chris Mason
E-Mail: masoncs@comcast.net
Shop: 064, PERA CV, NAVSHIPSO

Forrestal Scraping ~ If you read closely, the Navy PAID All Star Metal 1 cent ($0.01) to take the FID, not All Star "buying" her from the Navy...see the following website http://coltoncompany.com

Chris

Thursday, October 24, 2013

From: G EVANS
E-Mail: GEVANS1054@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 26 SHOP

JUST HEARD THAT THE USS FORESTAL WAS SOLD FOR ONR CENT TO A TEXAS SCRAP DEALER. SARRATOGA AND CONSTALLATION ARE ALSO FOR SALE.

ANYONE GOT A CENT?

Wednesday, October 23, 2013

From: Jim Kuhn
E-Mail: jjkatlad1@aol.com
Shop: 41 Shop

Sorry to announce the death of Pat Gallagher X41 Shop. Pat passed after a long battle with cancer. Another good man gone. Obituary below...

PATRICK J. GALLAGHER Sr.
Death Notice
GALLAGHER PATRICK J. SR., October 19, 2013, age 72, born in South Philadelphia, he was a U.S. Army Veteran, retired Superintendent Boilermaker Shop Philadelphia Naval Ship Yard, who operated Gallagher's Pack & Ship with his wife in Media, PA. Past President of the Springfield Youth Club, proud member of the following: Gallagher's Irish Society, Joseph E. Montgomery AOH Division #65, The Knights of Columbus DeLaSalle and The Greater Wildwood Elks Club #1896. An avid Eagles and Phillies fan he enjoyed year round visits to his Wildwood Crest home with his grand-children, family and friends. He was predeceased by his parents Daniel and Mary Gallagher and his brother Daniel. Beloved husband of Kathleen M. (nee Copeland) Gallagher; father of Patrick J., Jr. (Jennifer), Daniel J. (Meaghan), Colleen Gallagher, Ellen (Frank) Cignetti and Brian Gallagher; brother of the late Daniel (Margie) Gallagher, Catherine (the late Frank) Armstrong, Mary (the late Frank) Martin, Anna May (Tom)!
Cocco, and Monica (Bill) Stefanik. Also survived by 12 grandchildren. Relatives and friends are invited to his viewing Thursday evening 6 - 8 P.M. at St. Francis of Assisi Church Saxer Ave., Springfield where his Funeral Mass will be Friday morning at 11:00 A.M. There will also be a viewing at RUFFENACH FUNERAL HOME, 4900 Township Line @ Burmont Rd., Drexel Hill, on Friday morning from 9 - 10 A.M. Interment private. In lieu of flowers donations in Pat's memory to The Springfield Youth Club, P.O. Box 231, Springfield, Pa. 19064 or Crozer Keystone Hospice at Taylor Hospital, 175 E. Chester Pike, Ridley Park, Pa. 19078 would be appreciated.

Thursday, October 17, 2013

From: Dennis Kaiser
E-Mail: den69125@hotmail.com
Shop: Shop 011

A Yardbird has turned Auther. Jim Brennan, a 26 shop Welder as well as NAVSHIPSO employee (Retired) has written a book. I haven't read it but I will. Just wanted to get the info out to any one interested, in what I believe, will be a good read.

The Title is: Twenty-Four Years to Boston My Journey from the Vegetable Aisle to Boylston Street

ISBN 978-1-937943-13-4 • 180 pages • $24.95 St. Johann Press
315 Schraalenburgh Road
Haworth, NJ 07641

Order from Amazon.com, your independent bookstore, or directly from St. Johann Press, P.O. Box 241, Haworth, NJ 07641.
Jim Brennan

This book began as a series of scribbling that Jim kept while training for his second marathon. It had been twenty years since he had run in the 1981 Philadelphia Marathon and he was curious as to how his body would perform after the passage of two decades. A few years ago, he reviewed his notes leading up to the 2001 Philly Marathon and for the first time he found a story that needed to be told. Surprisingly, the marathon was only a backdrop to the story of his life. Running had been with him from his underachieving childhood when he was placed in the Vegetable Aisle (a row of classroom desks that housed students who were determined to be in a vegetative state) to the Boston Marathon finish line on Boylston Street. It was a story about the challenges and triumphs of an aging marathoner who inadvertently discovered that running had helped him overcome his insecurities and succeed in life.

Running transcended physical conditioning and taught lesson on how to live, how to be present and how to appreciate the important things in live—health, family, friends, and the world around us. This journey began along the trails in the Philadelphia region, and the narrative germinated into a story on trails across the country.
On terrains as diverse as the Sonoran Desert, the Rocky Mountains, the plains of Iowa and the Southern California coast, Jimmy found that running is a universal language that reveals all runners share an irrepressible passion for life.

Wednesday, October 16, 2013

From: hank giordano
E-Mail: giordanohank@comcast.net
Shop: x31

pulled the plug 8/02/13 15yrs at the yard 15 yrs. at us mint time to enjoy retirement will always remember years spent at the yard

Monday, October 14, 2013

From: Julio Casiano
E-Mail: Julio@Philly-Yardbird.com
Shop: 67964-026
 

I too retired at the end of August.  12 years with the Yard and 20 with the Federal Bureau of Prisons.

Although the prison work was interesting at times, there's nothing like watching that ship go down the river after years of hard work.

Monday, October 14, 2013

From: Ray Haffelfinger
E-Mail: raym1207@aol.com
Shop: X56/360 & 263.3

Just retired from federal service after 34 years ( August 31,2013) 16 with the 'yard, 5 yrs. with the post office and the past 13 yrs. with the U.S. Mint and enjoyed it all, especially the yard will never forget those times and people. Worked with a lot of 'birds at the mint all good guys.Now working for the Marple Newtown trasportation dept. and loving every minute of it. Semi-retiremnt is GOOD we all should try it, don't wait until it's too late WE ALL deserve it.

Wednesday, October 2, 2013

From: Frank Dinan
E-Mail: bxtd@msn.com
Shop: 56

Just a short note to thank Jack for his hard work getting this year's reunion together. Hope more people attend next year.

Wednesday, September 11, 2013

From: Mike Miller
E-Mail: Mikemiller3325@gmail.com
Shop: 26 shop

Any body remember a welder name Jake Harris? He worked on 2nd shift most of the time. If any one that is in touch with him, could I get his email or phone number from you. Take Care Mike Miller

Thursday, September 12, 2013

From: Ray Smith
E-Mail: hooraysmith54@gmail.com
Shop: x51 shop Forman

Hi guys long time I am down here in the great state of Tx. (heat city)

Sunday, September 1, 2013

From: Mike Bower
E-Mail: bruddaboo71@msn.com
Shop: 26 Shop

Kathleen, I remember Ricky very well, I'm sorry to here of his passing. He was a very funny guy, always making you laugh. I remember one job, I forget which ship, Ricky was standing on a bucket doing overhead welding. I was laying on the ground doing flat welding (I,m 6'10"). I say to Ricky, "What The Heck", he dives off of the bucket, onto me, and commences to pound on me yelling and screaming. Of course it was all in fun, that's how he was. RIP Ricky.
 

August 29, 2013

From : kathleen padulese <kathleenp@comcast.net>

Hello, I came upon your website when I remembered what shop my husband worked at back in the '80's. He was a welder and worked in the 26 shop. His name is Richard Padulese. He passed away last year, and I was just wondering if anyone remembered him. I know he worked with Tony Bell and Anthony Pappalardo. Unfortunately, Anthony passed away quite a few years ago.
sincerely,

Kathleen Padulese

Friday, August 23, 2013

From: Ellen Booth
E-Mail: Ellen.Booth@comcast.net
Shop: 26

Got lost a few years in cyberspace between California and Philly.
Please note my current and local e-mail address. Thank you.

Sunday, August 11, 2013

From: ted bochanski
E-Mail: tedbo@rcn.com
Shop: 56

56 SHOP Marine Pipefitters Unite!

https://www.facebook.com/groups/365805690188700/?fref=tck

August 6, 2013

I think all Yard-Birds will find the information provided on the below link interesting. The 68 page Plan, as updated for 2013, shows what is in store for our beloved PNSY 18 years after closing. The Navy Yard Master Plan is provided by Phila Industrial Development Corp, Phila Authority for Industrial Development, Liberty Property Trust and Synterra Partners

I can only remember what the Yard was to me, in my 38 year career


Chris Mason, x64, NAVSHIPSO


http://www.navyyard.org/master-plan-2013/#/1/zoomed

Sunday, August 4, 2013

From: Joe Walker
E-Mail: jkwalker63@gmail.com
Shop: USS LaSalle 1981/82

First time in the yard went down with my dad from Logan to see his ship, the USS Macon in reserve. Then find myself on the LaSalle years later. Remember the yardbirds were great guys, mostly kind and a wide variety of personalities. I recall Bob Harrigan, and an old welder named Seymore.

Wednesday, July 31, 2013

From: Cliff Nash
E-Mail: pnsycliff@aol.com
Shop: 06

Attention shop 06, 31 & 38

MACHINIST (Winslow Township NJ)

Looking for an experienced Machinist (3+ years). Your experience will determine the hourly rate.

Set-up & operator manual mills, manual lathes, drill presses and grinders. Candidate must have precision tooling associated to the trade. A working knowledge of machining techniques & methods.

Full benefits include medical, prescription, dental and vision plan is available.

401K available

This is a full-time, first shift position with the opportunity for overtime when needed.

Please respond to this ad via email

Location: Winslow Township NJ
Compensation: Hourly rate based on experience

Wednesday, July 17, 2013

From: John Ferraina
E-Mail: johnferraina@comcast.net
Shop: 11 shop

Sorry to see the passing of Pete Purifoy, We had great times with him and doc stella from 17 shop they were two wild and crazy guys.
RIP Pete.

Monday, July 15, 2013

From: Ron 'Garbage' Reeves
E-Mail: pnsy17shop@comcast.net
Shop: 17

Yo Animal !!!!!! Where you at !!!! Garbage Man here. I remember those Keilbasa Sandwiches you had on the Luce at lunchtime !!! Boy were they good !!!! Remember the Mayport trip where you 'decided' the rental car had too much sand in it, and you rode us all to the beach and drove the car into the ocean to wash it all out !!!!! I'll never forget that...... Glad to hear you're still alive in Florida home of old people send me an email.... Garbo....

Wednesday, July 10, 2013

From: robert hakim sr.
E-Mail: Robert.hakim@djj.state.fl.us
Shop: X11

just found this site and think it is great will be following up and adding stories/comments soon Animal

Wednesday, July 10, 2013

From: Dennis Kaiser
E-Mail: den69125@msn.com
Shop: 011, NFPC

The Naval Foundry and Propeller Center in association with The Collegiate Consortium for Workforce and Economic Development is seeking qualified applicants for Machinist & Foundry Molder Apprenticeship Programs

Successful completion of these programs provide full-time employment, journeyperson status, and an Associate Degree in Applied Science

*Informational briefings will be held at:
Delaware County Community College
Marple Main Campus
901 S. Media Line Road
Media, PA 19063

Information sessions are scheduled for:

Tuesday July 9, 2013 6:00 – 7:00 PM Room #1403
Tuesday July 16, 2013 8:30 -- 9:30 AM Room #1407
Tuesday July 16, 2013 6:00 – 7:00 PM Room #1403

Seating is limited, RSVP required 24 hours in advance

Please call (610) 355-7156, 359-5063 for more information

Monday, July 8, 2013

From: Ron "Garbage' Reeves
E-Mail: pnsy17shop@comcast.net
Shop: 17

I see Where Spanky Joe passed. Denny Kaiser told me about it In my opinion, he was a good leader.

Thursday, July 4, 2013

From: Ron (Garbage) Reeves
E-Mail: pnsy17shop@comcast.net
Shop: 17

Cindy & Family... I was saddened just now to learn of the death of Pete one of my shipmates, we had tons of fun together during our years at the shipyard. He always had a smile regardless of the circumstances, and I will miss him dearly, he's smiling now from heaven. My utmost condolences. No one calls me to pass the word not even Nacho. What a shame to hear of this type of message as our family gets older and thins out we as shipmates should stick together God Bless :-)

Wednesday, July 3, 2013

From: stephen kempczynski (ski)
E-Mail: 8paws6205@comcast.net
Shop: 51 shop

worked from 1987-1994 looking for guys from the old gang

Wednesday, July 3, 2013

From: Tom Maiorano
E-Mail: tmaiorano14@comcast.net
Shop: 38 Shop

To all my shipyard brothers and sisters, have a safe and Happy 4th of July.

Friday, June 28, 2013

From: Jimmy Williams
E-Mail: jhw0217@live.com
Shop: X56,07,PW

A little shipyard humor:
I have a problem. I have two brothers, One brother works at the shipyard, the other is sentenced to death in the electric chair. My mother died from insanity when I was three years old. My two sisters are prostitutes and my father sells narcotics.
Recently I met a girl who has just been released from an institution where she served time for smothering her ill-legitimate child. I love this girl very much and want to marry her.

My problem is this: should I tell her about my brother that works at the shipyard?

Tuesday, June 25, 2013

From: Jerry Keer
E-Mail: jerrykeer@verizon.net
Shop: 56

Apprenticeship in 1955 to resignation 1964. Experiences were very valuable to my life in private industry. Last Yard assignment was pipe detailing in 620 Building at Dry-dock 4.

Saturday, June 8, 2013

From: Chuck Kessler
E-Mail: chuckoluck123@wi.rr.com
Shop: 17 Shop

I was sad to learn of the passing of Milton ( Pete ) Puriefoy. He was a great guy and always very friendly and caring. R.I.P.

Monday, June 3, 2013

From: John Benckert
E-Mail: jbenckert@comcast.net
Shop: 11

I was a shipfitter apprentice back in the late 60's to early 70's.
Is there any place where any of the old training manuals can be purchased?

Friday, May 24, 2013

From: GERRY EVANS
E-Mail: GEVANS1054@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 26 SHOP

FYI; JOE COSTELLO PASSED AWAY THIS WEEK. A PORT RICHMOND BOY, NORTH CATHOLIC GRAD. A FORMER SHIPFITTER' SUPR METAL INSPECTOR. WWII VETERAN, NAVY SEABEE, WHO BUILT SECRET AIR BASES IN CENTRAL ANERICA DURING THE WAR. ANOTHER OF THE GREAT GENERATION HAS PASSED ON.

Wednesday, May 22, 2013

From: RICHARD BEGGS
E-Mail: RICH.BEGGS@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 64

I was saddened to see the obituary of Sam Alexander, a Shipwright from 64 shop. Sam was the finest gentleman I have ever met at the shipyard.

May 13, 2013

From: Cynthia T <ladyct106@hotmail.com>
Date: Sun, May 12, 2013 6:52 am

It is with my deepest regrets that I inform you of the passing of Mr. Milton Puriefoy Sr. (Shop 17) which occurred on Wednesday, May 8, 2013 after a lengthy battle with heart failure.

Funeral services will be held on Saturday May 18th 2013 at
Sayre United Methodist Church
6101 Catherine St
Philadelphia, Pa

Viewing 9-10am
Service 10am

Feel free to contact my for further information at this email address.

Sorrowfully Submitted,

Cynthia Talley (Shop 17)
ladyct106@hotmail.com

Wednesday, May 8, 2013

From: Jimmy Williams
E-Mail: jhw0217@live.com
Shop: X56,07,PW

William A. Repp William A. Repp, on May 5, 2012, age 80 of Broomall for 44 years, formerly of Darby.
Born in Philadelphia, he graduated from Overbrook High School in 1950,where he was involved with the Math Club. He was employed by the US Navy as a Estimator/Plumber for the US Navy for 35 years, retiring in 1986.
He then was employed as a school bus driver (Bus #9) for the Marple Newtown High School for 17 years, retiring in 2008. He was a veteran of the Korean War in the US Army reaching the rank of Cpl as a Turret Artillery Mechanic.
He enjoyed helping his kids, grandkids and friends with all of there needs. He was a former coach in the Larchmont Little League, and he himself was active in club sports as a youth. He was married to the former Dorothy (nee Miller), they were married in June of 1955 and she passed away in March of 2002.
Survivors: His children Donna (Joseph) Wassel of Aston, Steve (Kerri) Repp of West Chester, Jennifer (Joseph) Shannon of Downingtown, his grandchildren, Joseph, Matthew, Brandon, Shane, Katie, Conor and Bridget, his brother Ed Repp of Cape Coral, FL, his sisters Alice Repp of Phila., and Helen Deffler of Sicklerville, NJ, he was predeceased by his brother Frank and Charles Repp.
Calling Hours: Relatives and friends are invited to his calling time on Wednesday eve, 6:00 to 8:00 PM, and Thursday, 10:00 to 11:00AM, in the Frank C. Videon Funeral Home, Sproul and Lawrence Rds., Broomall, followed by his funeral service at 11:00. Memorials may be sent in his name to: the , 501 St. Jude Place, Memphis, TN 39105.
Interment: Edgewood Memorial Park
 

Tuesday, May 7, 2013

From: Mike Pettineo
E-Mail: mpettineo@aol.com
Shop: 56 & Naval Station Shops

Just wanted to inform everybody that Bill Repp passed away on sunday may 5 ,2013.Bill was a plumber and a planner / estimator for 07 shop for 35 years. He was 80 yrs. old

Tuesday, May 7, 2013

From: John Rola
E-Mail: jjr109@aol.com
Shop: 31/093

Just wanted to pass on that Ron Benckert, 31 shop Machinist, passed away on April 22, 2013.

Tuesday, April 30, 2013

From: Ed Worff
E-Mail: edsworff@verizon.net
Shop: x51 Test Gang & C/365

Sorry to hear of the passing of Joe Barecca. Joe & I first met when we started our apprenticeship together in 51 shop in 1961. He was a proud WW2 Marine vet. Yes, he had a tough exterior but I came to know him as a warm friend.

Tuesday, April 30, 2013

From:
E-Mail: mm2e1@yahoo.com
Shop: 38

I thought by now that someone would of corrected the obiituary for Ray Thrash who passed on Oct. 24 2012. In part it reads a member of the Tin Cup veterans group, Shouldn't it be Tin Can veterans group

Monday, April 29, 2013

From: Ed Norkus
E-Mail: norkused@verizon.net
Shop: 51, NFPC

Sorry to report the loss of another yardbird

John E. Lange(1949 - 2013)

AGE: 63 • Barrington

John E. Lange, of Barrington, passed peacefully on April 27, 2013, surrounded by his family. Age 63. Beloved husband of Sandra (nee Moritz). Devoted father of Steven, Alex and his wife Lindsay and Kevin and his wife Tara. Loving grandfather of Chloe Ava and Maya Elizabeth. Dear brother-in-law of Janet McNamee. Loving uncle of Kyle McNamee. John worked for the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Shop 51, for 35 years. He was a US Army veteran. Relatives and friends are invited to attend the viewing Wednesday morning from 9 to 11am at GARDNER FUNERAL HOME, RUNNEMEDE. Funeral Service Wednesday 11am at the funeral home. Entombment New St. Mary's Mausoleum, Bellmawr. In lieu of flowers the family requests that donations be made in John's name to the Animal Adoption Center, P O Box 4017, Lindenwold, NJ 08021.

Saturday, April 27, 2013

From: Corey Bates
E-Mail: pipefitter81@msn.com
Shop: 56 shop

Hey Brothers I just found out about the web site... That is great...

Peace always...
Corey
56 shop

Friday, April 26, 2013

From: Frank Walsh
E-Mail: stingray231@comcast.net
Shop: X51, P&E

I'm saddened to tell you that my old friend Joe Barreca has passed. Joe aways put on tough exterior when you had to ask him for help in 51 Shop. When I started working wth him in P&E however I came to discover that he actually had a heart of gold and would give anyone the shirt off his back if asked. He was a rare breed and will truely be missed.

Monday, April 15, 2013

From: RICHARD BEGGS
E-Mail: RICH.BEGGS@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 64 SHOP - SHIPWRIGHTS

Ken: thanks for the great pictures. The one showing dry dock 2 caisson docked in dry dock 1 brings back memories. The dock side walls were timber until about 1950 when dry dock 1 was rebuilt. The caption for the picture notes that dry dock 2 cassion was in dock to repair the rubber gasket. It seems the yard waas having problems with the gasket then, as we did later.

Friday, April 12, 2013

From: Ron "Garbage' Reeves
E-Mail: pnsy17shop@comcast.net
Shop: X-17

In May 1945, the captured U-858 was moved to PNSY for overhaul on the rail. I have a photo of it, and there's a large building south of it, and painted on the roof is 'Yacht Storage' maybe one of you guys that worked the rail knew of it, and can tell me when it was torn down, and maybe the building number of it ? PNSY maps I have do not show it. The blasting area for X-71 I think stands where it was near the bridge... Thanks.

Friday, April 12, 2013

From: RICHARD BEGGS
E-Mail: RICH.BEGGS@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 64 SHOP

Mike: The picture of a sub on the marine railway is the only nuclear hull (Albercore) ever docked there. It was a test hull (no nuclear plant or any machinery inside. We had to do extensive work on the railway to get the sub on the blocks. Why it was ever docked, or worked on is still a mystery to me.

Sunday, April 7, 2013

From: Joe Rosenberg
E-Mail: rosey08062@gmail.com
Shop: 64

Mike Dougerty I am still around. I spent most of my aprenticeship at pier D and maybe a year or so after I got out of my time. Most of our work was in the battery wells,formica install,and cork insulation. I made trips to Keywest Florida and Point Loma California to do sub battery work. When I made Foreman they shipped me out front but by that time most sub work was over. Do you remember when Turk from 38 shop came down the browl off of a sub river run swinging a tennis racket. 57 pipe cover shack was next to out wedge shanny at the head of pier D. Just wanted to let you know a pier D guy is still around and remembers to back cannel.

Saturday, April 6, 2013

From: Mike Dougherty
E-Mail: mikedougherty63@yahoo.com
Shop: 56 shop

Thanks Ken,I enjoyed the pictures,especially the marine railway.I remember being part of that group.We never wanted to work the "waterfront" again.I even got to make a river run on a sub.I was berthed in the aft torpedo room when we did the crashback dive I was sure we were finished.The noise and my fear was incredible.The yard sure was good to me.Are there any other back channel boys around?

Friday, March 29, 2013

From: Tony Santini
E-Mail: anthony.santini@navy.mil
Shop: IRO

Ex-Yardbirds welcomed.

Federal Employees (and their friends!)
“Welcome Spring Happy 3 Hours"
Thursday, April 4th, 2013
5-8 pm at…

Xfinity Live! Philadelphia (South Philly) In the NBC Sports Arena,1100 Pattison Ave., Phila. PA 19148

$3 draft beers; $3 well drinks; $3 house wines. Free pizza! Free Parking!(Adjacent in the 11th Street lot)

The Phillies and Flyers have away games this night so you can watch them on the large screen. Table/menu service will be available at any of the other venues within XFinity Live!

Upon arrival, guests must obtain a wristband from the host/hostess at the NBC Sports Arena Stand by mentioning“Federal Employees Happy Hour”

Tuesday, March 26, 2013

From: Danny O'Kane
E-Mail: dannyboydpo@rcn.com
Shop: 11 Shop

Thank you , Ken , for the information and photos of the Yard. I'm a history buff and this is awesome. Worked at the Yard from 1966 to 1989 out of the Shipfitter Shop. Met some "interesting" characters along the way. Never a dull moment !! Again , thank you..

Sunday, March 24, 2013

From: Ken Goldberg
E-Mail: kenneth.s.goldberg@usace.army.mil
Shop: Design Code 264

http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/pa3416/
Very good set of photos and historical information about the yard that was prepared by the department of interior right around the time of the closure.

From: Tony Santini
Shop: IRO

Don't be fooled like me!

There is a new kids fashion trend of shirts, sweaters and bags with large script letters which appear to be “PNSY".

At first glance, I thought that someone had designed a retro Philadelphia Naval Shipyard shirt!

Actually, the letters are “PSNY” and this is a new line of pre-teen, boys and girls clothing from Aeropostale.

Don't get caught questioning the little kids who are wearing these shirts. They get very nervous and start looking for the authorities.

Wednesday, March 6, 2013

From: Danny O'Kane
E-Mail: dannyboydpo@rcn.com
Shop: 11 Shop

R.I.P. Mr. Bochanski a member of THE GREATEST GENERATION and VETERAN. Slow hand salute......
My thoughts and prayers to the family ,Danny O'Kane God Bless Our Troops !!!

Sunday, March 3, 2013

From: Jack Balkir
E-Mail: jbalkir@gmail.com
Shop: 51 SHOP / CODE 1200

I am so sadden to hear the passing of Charlie White (51 Shop G/F) recently. Charlie and I were very good friends and working partners for a long long time. I miss you Charlie, rest in peace.

Sunday, March 3, 2013

From: Andy Dank
E-Mail: Old foagie@yahyoo.com
Shop: 47

George V. Bochanski
 

"Grandpop you will always be remembered for the great man..."
- Julia Bochanski

George V. Bochanski, born in Philadelphia on September 4, 1921 to the late Joseph and Helen Bochanski. Mr. Bochanski most recently resided in Secane, PA, but lived in Sharon Hill, PA for more than 50 years and was a faithful and active parishioner of Holy Spirit Church for over 60 years.
He was married for 56 years to the late Irene M. McLaughlin. He was a combat-wounded Army infantry veteran who saw action in France and Germany in World War II and received a Purple Heart with Oak Leaf Cluster and the Bronze Star.
Mr. Bochanski retired as a Group Superintendent from the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard in 1985. During his 35 year career, he held positions of increasing responsibility in the rigging group (72 Shop) at the shipyard. He was president of the National Association of Supervisors - Federal Government (now the Federal Managers Association)and a graduate of The Comey Institute of Industrial Relations at Saint Joseph's University.
Never known to be idle, following retirement Mr. Bochanski remained busy with renovation projects at his summer home in Wildwood, NJ and at the homes of numerous family members throughout the area.
Survivors: his six children; Irene M. Hart (Thomas) of Glenolden, PA, George V. Bochanski Jr. (Kathleen) of Lansdowne, PA, Francis X.
Bochanski (Joanne) of Turnersville, NJ, John J. Bochanski (Virginia) of Sewell, NJ, Theodore W. Bochanski (Cynthia) of Folcroft, PA, and Joseph P. Bochanski of Williamstown, NJ. He was also the father in law of the late Deborah Bochanski, wife of Joseph.
Mr. Bochanski had 25 grandchildren and 23 great grand children.
Visitation: 9 to 10:30 AM on Tuesday, March 5th, at Holy Spirit Church, Sharon Hill, PA Mass of Christian Burial: to follow at 10:30 AM Burial: Holy Cross Cemetery, Yeadon In lieu of flowers contributions may be made in his name to the Holy Spirit Memorial Fund, 1028 School Street, Sharon Hill, PA 19079

Saturday, March 2, 2013

From: G EVANS
E-Mail: GEVANS1054@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 26 SHOP

MORE ON ALUMINUM PT BOATS.
IN THE LATE 1940'S BUREAU OF SHIPS (BUSHIPS) WANTED TO USE ALUMINUM IN SHIP CONSTRUCTION. AIR REDUCTION (AIRCO) DEVELOPED A WELDING PROCESS, MANUAL INERT GAS (MIG). MELTING ALUMINUM WIRE WITHIN A INERT GAS SHIELD. THEIR WIRE FEEDER (TURTLEBACH) WAS DIFFICULT TO WORK WITH AND ALMOST IMPOSSIBLE TO USE ONBOARD A SHIP.
THE WELDERS AND 06 SHOP ELECTRIANS RECONFIGURED THE COMPONENTS AND MADE A WIRE FEEDER (DOODLEBUG)WHICH COULD BE MOVED AROUND BY HAND.
THEY MARRIED THIS FEEDER WITH A FLAME CUTTING TRACTOR AND PRODUCED THE FIRST AUTOMATIC MIG WELDING MACHINE.
SOME OF THE WELDERS AND ELECTRIAN RECEIVED PATENTS ON PARTS USED IN THE MANUFACTURE OF THESE FEEDERS. THE YARD WENT ON TO BUILD 20 UNITS. THEY RECEIVED A BENNY SUG AWARD OF $250.00.
THE PROCESS CHANGED ITS NAME TO GAS METAL ARC (GMA) AND TODAY IT IS USED IN 80% OF ALL HEAVY METAL FABRICATION.

Tuesday, February 26, 2013

From: Joe Bochanski
E-Mail: Joebo@comcast.net
Shop: 56 shop pipe fitter

Just wanted to let everyone know that we lost a true a true legenald of the Navy Yard last night. My father who was know as Big George passed last night at the age of 91!
He loved his time at the yard as we all did! He Had a peaceful death that reunited with his wife and siblings thank you all we will always be a family at the shipyard for sure.

Monday, February 25, 2013

From: Joe Bochanski Jr
E-Mail: Jb311@comcast.net
Shop: 72

I regret to inform everyone that my grandfather, George Bochanski (72 shop) passed away this afternoon February 25 2013 at the age of 91. I will post more information when I receive it.

Wednesday, February 20, 2013

From: Jim Walker
E-Mail: walk38@ptd.net
Shop: 41, type desk

Paternosters comment reminded me of the coldest experience of my life.Winter 1961, they wanted to take the british gas turbine out of this boat to be sent to a display at the Naval Academy and I got sent out to remove the exhaust system. The boat was up on blocks on wharf "K" where the two rivers meet.There was no utility hook up and the fasteners were English sized different from ASE and not Metric. We hoofed it over a mile to call for heat, and light. Nothing ever showed up. While waiting I found the log book from the tests they ran on this boat. There was a lot of vibration damage and sea worthiness problems.
It was first aluminum hull and they found out a lot about the design changes needed But gave up on the boat.The CO asked several times to be allowed to take the boat to calmer warmer waters But was denied.
Never got the job done. Only one of two times I can remember giving up. They wound up cutting the unit out of the boat.

Tuesday, February 19, 2013

From: silvio menna
E-Mail: silvio.menna@navy.mil
Shop: 71

still have never really gotten over the birds i had the pleasure to work with and befriend in my 18 years there. it wasn't the ideal work enviroment but somehow it just "worked", and even though i'm still working for the navy in a safer enviroment with real nice people, nothing will ever compare to my time spent there at PNSY. to those that i knew and remember and those that i don't, thanx for a real quality time in my life, the best group of men and women i've ever had the pleasure to be a part of.
sincerely,
Silvio

Monday, February 11, 2013

From: R. Paternostro
E-Mail:
Shop:

I never worked at the Navy Ship yard, but remember fondly flying over it everytime we flew home into the philly airport. I was in awe everytime.

I have recently been into reading about WWII, and how Buckley wanted to build a Patrol Torpedo Boat, the only one built out of Aluminum, while all the others were built of wood by outside contractors. It was built at the Navy Shipyard, in Philadelphia. Although, it did not win the compitition, known as the plywood durbey, it was part of history of WWII, the history of The Philadelphia Navy Ship yard, and the history of Philadelphia.

Wednesday, February 6, 2013

From: Robert Hannon
E-Mail: robertchannon@msn.com
Shop: shop11

I still miss all of the days back in PNSY. Still working and hanging sponsons. Just finished another carrier and will work 5 more years and then retire with 40 years of service. Hope that all is well.

Thursday, January 24, 2013

From: Rich Gonzoph
E-Mail: richard.gonzoph@navy.mil
Shop: 11/C231


George J. O'Brien

AGE: 81 • Medford

George J. O'Brien, on January 21, 2013, of Medford, formerly of Camden. Age 81. Beloved husband for 56 ľ years of Rose (nee Hilbmann). Devoted father of Timothy, Dennis and Michele. Loving grandfather of Brandon Hook, Cody Patrick & Gianna Iuliucci, Dennis O'Brien and Joseph DeCrosta. Dear brother of Edward, Marie Balser and the late Francis, Jr., Patricia Longstreet, and John "Jack" Campbell. Predeceased by his parents, Francis A., Sr. and Marie O'Brien (nee McVeigh). Mr. O'Brien was born in Fishtown, PA. He was known for his love for his family, his pride in honorably serving his country as a U. S. Marine, his ready wit, and his love of coffee (often served up by his diner friends). He was rarely without a quip or a coffee cup. "Obie" was a "Yard Bird" for 32 years, retiring from the US Naval Shipyard in Philadelphia, PA in 1993. He started out as a welding apprentice, had a short stint as a DOD Policeman, then progressed to welder, welding instructor, planner/estimator, and welding engineering technician. There will be a viewing from 11:30am to 12:30pm Saturday at GARDNER FUNERAL HOME, RUNNEMEDE. Funeral service 12:30pm Saturday at the funeral home. Interment private at the request of the family. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in George's memory to the charity of the donor's choice or to the American Cancer Society, 1851 Old Cuthbert Road, Cherry Hill, NJ 08034 or the American Diabetes Association, 150 Monument Road, Suite 100, Bala Cynwyd, PA 19004. Family and friends may share memories at www.GardnerFuneralHome.com. Semper Fi, George.

Monday, January 21, 2013

From: dennis w raitter
E-Mail: draitter@tds.net
Shop: 51 shop

Joseph C. White (charlie)

AGE: 74 • W. Deptford

Joseph C. White "Charlie" age 74, passed away on January 18, 2013. He was a resident of W. Deptford and a former resident of Camden. Charlie was a retired United States Airforce Veteran. He was an Electric General Supervisor at the Philadelphia Navy Yard for 32 years, and has been a member of the Moose Lodge #548 in Lindenwold for 24 years. Also Charlie was a very devout Catholic.

He is the beloved husband of Beatrice R. "Penny" (nee Tait). Dear father of Patricia White, JoAnn White, both of Blackwood, NJ and Corrine McLeod of West Deptford, NJ. Special grandpop of Rachael, Courtney, Cheyenne and Alexis "his Babe" and loving great-grandfather of 3. He is the brother of James, Gerald, Maryjane, Cathy (Ron), and the late Lorretta. Also he is survived by numerous nieces and nephews.

Relatves and friends are invited to his viewing Wednesday eve 7pm at the Alloway and Donnelly Funeral Home & Cremation Service (523-25 Cumberland St Gloucester City) Religious Services will begin 8:30pm at the Funeral Home. Int. Private. Family strongly requests memorial donations in his memory be made to the S.C.E.A. at www.secondchanceequine.com.

Monday, January 21, 2013

From: John F Bonella
E-Mail: Bonellajb@msn.com
Shop: 31 and apprentice program

I have a composite picture which is 36" long. There are over 3 hundred men picutred in 6 rows. the pix was taken Dec 13,1936. the shops ID as 11, 23,26 and 41. my father was a leadingman in 11 shop and then promoted to quarterman when WW11 broke out. Was there about 30 years with a short stay at "Cramps" in N.E. Phila.
I was there as a young boy to see the USS Washington and later the Wisconsin launched. Have some items left, but most were donated to the New Jersey Memorial. Would like to identify the shops in the pix and any others that might be available.

Sunday, January 20, 2013

From: Ron Miller
E-Mail: ronfish2002@yahoo.com
Shop: 31

I guess my previous e-mail didn't make it, so I'll try again. Anyway, sad to report the passing of 31 Shop machinist, Al Strohmetz on January 6, 2013. He was a meticulous machinist/mechanic and a good worker. Al and I kept in touch after the Yard closed and I always enjoyed his company, and his crusty sense of humor. Rest in peace old friend.
Ron Miller
31 Shop

Thursday, January 17, 2013

From: Dennis Kaiser
E-Mail: den69125_1@msn.com
Shop: 11, 250, 920, 39, HRO

There will be a "Celebration of Life Mass” for Chris Kuhls on SATURDAY --- JANUARY 26TH -- At 11:00 AM At:

The ASSUMPTION BVM CHURCH
300 STATE ROAD
WEST GROVE, PA.

Wednesday, January 16, 2013

From: Renee (Denny) O'Hara
E-Mail: Ohara.renee@gmail.com
Shop: 31/39/2900/NMIC

Is anyone else out there preparing for the pending 'furlough'? Give me a break, Navy!!!! I'm starting to take this personally!

To Whom It May Concern,

I am helping a 91 yr old Naval Officer write his biography.

I am have trouble finding the correct agency to assist with information pertaining to his years in the Navy.

Could you please direct me to the correct contacts...please.

The type of information I desperately need...which would probably help his "memory" somewhat are...

Any personal files on Harrison Miller Moseley. He was drafted and immediately made a Naval Officer in the early 1940s. He worked on the Manhattan Project (TheAtomic Bomb)

If there are group pictures with Nathan Rosen, Philip Abelson...there is a good chance Miller would be in the photos... He was a 23 yr old kid.

He would be transferred from Anacosna (home base) to the Philadelphia Naval yard and to Oak Ridge constantly. He said, he never knew where he would be the next day.

He said he sat in front of Oppenheimer in a meeting at the end of the war (I think?) in which the speaker was Urey.
Any pictures or information about such a meeting?

Gunn was investigating a UFO that had fallen into the English Channel.....in the 1940s.... How can I find what happened?

Any assistance is GREATLY appreciated.

Stella Brooks
1104 Montego Rd
Fort Worth, TX 76116
8173123598
SEBrooks3@yahoo.com

Friday, January 4, 2013

From: Chalie Ries
E-Mail: criesjr@comcast.net
Shop: 41 shop

Hope everyone had a good holiday season and will enjoy the New Year.
I pulled the plug yesterday after 39+. I was lucky to go to Public Works after the closure and ended up with Social Security for 12 1/2 years.
A long enough ride and the best was in 41 Shop at the Yard. Hope everyone gets a chance to retire and enjoy it.

Tuesday, January 1, 2013

From: Rob Reagan
E-Mail: reagan3rd@live.com
Shop: 56

Remenicing about my Navy Yard years...lost my Dad this time last year..
I really miss taking the ferry home and talking to him about how the day had gone..

Monday, December 24, 2012

From: Tom Maiorano
E-Mail: pnsytom1@verizon.net
Shop: 38 Shop

I would like to wish all my Shipyard brothers and sisters a Merry Christmas and a very Happy New Year.

Thursday, December 20, 2012

From: Dennis Kaiser
E-Mail: den69125_1@msn.com
Shop: 11, C250, 39 Shop, C920

I just wanted to let everyone know we lost Chris Khoules last night. He passed away at home with his family all around him.
Sorry to be the bearer of bad news.

Dennis Kaiser

Tuesday, November 20, 2012

From: Jim Merkins
E-Mail: jj.merkins@comcast.net
Shop: 06-31-88-81

Shop 17 was near the boat shop in the building where the riggers moved into, right off of Broad St.

I think the building where shop 17 was originally was Bldg. 25

Monday, November 19, 2012

From: Marc Calabrese
E-Mail: cram.spam@yahoo.com
Shop: n/a

My grandfather, Peter Palumbo, work in the yard up until shortly before his death in 1965 from lung cancer (surprise?) He worked as a sheet metal worker in 17 shop. I, too, work on the former base, so I did some research and determined 990 bldg was where 17 shop was located. Except I also learned 990 bldg was built in 1969 after his death.

I'm trying to find out if anyone knows the former home of 17 shop prior to moving into bldg 990?

Many thanks!

-Marc

Saturday, November 3, 2012

From: Michael Antonio
E-Mail: erikamikeantonio@yahoo.com
Shop: 071

Jim was a good man and friend. R.I.P. Jim..

Tuesday, October 16, 2012

From: Ray Freda
E-Mail: raymond.freda@dla.mil
Shop: 06

Jim Fahy from 99 shop passed away on Sunday evening due to complications of lung cancer. As per Jim's request there will be no viewing or funeral. He was working as the Electrical supervisor at the VA Hospital since 2005. Before that he was the Fire Alarm Tech at Navfac in the Northeast. (Tabor Road)

Monday, October 15, 2012

From: Chuck Kessler
E-Mail: chuckoluck123@wi.rr.com
Shop: 17shop

R.I.P Senator Arlen Specter, he did his best to fight for us. Chuck Kessler 17shop

Monday, October 15, 2012

From: Chuck Kessler
E-Mail: chuckoluck123@wi.rr.com
Shop: 17 shop

I just found out about Carl, my condolences go out to the Madonna family. Chuck Kessler 17shop

Monday, October 15, 2012

From: Dan Madonna
E-Mail: mr.madonna527@gmail.com
Shop: 26

On behalf of our family I like to thank all of you for your kind thoughts,words and prayers during this sad ordeal. It was great to see so many old friends again -just a shame it was under these circumstances. To all the guys from the old 26 shop and other shops to all the men and woman from the prop shop thanks. I am sure Carl was listening and laughing at all the stories being told.

Wednesday, October 10, 2012

From: Bob Daley
E-Mail: hogdale@hotmail.com
Shop: 51

Whatever became of Bill (ROTTEN RALPH) Adair 51 shop foreman ????

Tuesday, October 2, 2012

From: Big Mike Bower
E-Mail: bruddaboo71@msn.com
Shop: 26 Shop

I am saddened to hear Carl Madonna has passed, he was a great guy and always treated me fairly. My condolences to the Madonna family.

Friday, September 28, 2012

From: Bruce Conte
E-Mail: sphilly_20659@yahoo.com
Shop: Shop56 P&E

Sad to hear about the passing of Carl Madonna. Met Carl many years ago down the yard. I was introduced to Carl by Dan (or Danny which I always called him). Danny and I went to Southern (South Philadelphia High) together. Carl was a great guy, and so is my buddy Danny. I want to express my sincere condolences to the Madonna family, especially to my friend Danny. I am so sorry for your loss.

Bruce Conte

Thursday, September 27, 2012

From: GERRY EVANSmailto:GEVANS1054@VERIZON.NET
E-Mail: GEVANS1054@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 26 SHOP

SORRY TO HEAR ABOUT CARL MADONNA. A GREAT PERSON.
WHEN I WAS RUNNING THE WELDING SCHOOL EDNA MCCABE,IRO, CALLED AND SAID SHE HAD SUMMER AIDS, HOW MANNY CAN I TAKE. GIVE ME TEN, IF THEY ARE FREE.
I LOOOKED AT THE NAMES ON THE LIST. CARL'S NAME WAS ON IT. AT 16 YEARS HE STARTED AT PNSY. HE DID 2YEARS AS A SUMMER AID, HIRED HIM ON AS A HELPER, SWITCH TO APPRENTICE WELDER.
CARL WORKED WITH ME AS A WELDER, FORMAN, GERERAL FORMAN, AND WHEN HE BECAME SUPERINTENDENT IT GAVE A LITTLE PRIDE TO SAY "I KNOW THIS MAN".

Wednesday, September 26, 2012

From: Dennis Kaiser
E-Mail: den69125_1@msn.com
Shop: 11

Got word today that Carl Madonna, Former 26 Shop Superintendent @ PNSY passed away last night after a battle with an illness. Carl was 1ne of the good guys and thre is and were many at PNSY. He will be greatly missed.

Services:
Viewing Sunday 9/30, 6-9 PM Gangemi Funeral Home
2232-2240 So. Broad St. (Broad & Wolf Sts.)
Philadelphia, Pa 19145
215-467-3838

Funeral Mass Monday 10/1, 10AM
St. Monica's Church
17th & Ritner Street
Philadelphia, PA 19145

Wednesday, September 26, 2012

From: Dan Madonna
E-Mail: dmadonna@philasd.org
Shop: 26 shop

Carl "Lefty-Crash" Madonna passed away at the age of 59 on Sept. 25 after a courageous battle with cancer. His viewing will be held on Sunday nite Sept. 30 hours 6 till 9 pm at Gangemi's Funeral parlor located on the corner of Broad and Wolf streets in South Philadelphia. Viewing also Mon. 830 till 930 AM followed by a mass of Christian Burial at St. Monica's Church at 17th and Ritner Streets. He will be laid to rest at St. Patricks Cementery Kennett Square PA.

My brother was a good man and will be sadly missed.

Wednesday, September 26, 2012

From: Jay R. Billups
E-Mail: jay.billups@navy.mil
Shop: 26

Sad news, Carl Madonna, Former Production Superintendent 26 Shop PNSY, Maintenance Manager NFPC passed away Tuesday Sept. 25, 2012.
Services:
Viewing Sunday 9/30, 6-9 PM
Gangemi Funeral Home
2232-2240 So. Broad St.
(Broad & Wolf Sts.)
Philadelphia, Pa 19145
215-467-3838
Funeral Mass Monday 10/1, 10AM
St. Monica's Church
17th & Ritner Street
Philadelphia, PA 19145

NEWS FLASH:


I have been informed by The Victor's Pub this morning about mistakenly booking two events on Saturday, October 20 by two different managers.


Consequently, our reunion date has been changed from Saturday, October 20 to Saturday, October 27 with no changes on event times (remains 5-8 PM). Please remark your calenders.


Thank you for your understanding and I hope this change did not cause any inconveniences.


Jack Balkir

Website: www.pnsyreunion.com


VISIT US IN Facebook (Search: PNSY REUNION)

Hello Everyone,

The Philadelphia Naval Ship Yard 2012 Reunion will be held at The Victor's Pub in Camden, NJ on Saturday, October 27, 2012 between 5-8 PM. The pub is located at 1 Market Street (Corner of Cooper & Market, old RCA building) and the free parking is provided cross the street from pub.

The cost per person is $20.00 for dinner plus $15.00 wrist band for (2) hour bar (includes all draft or bottle beer, all wines and well drinks) for total of $35.00 per person, if you decide to purchase the wrist band. Otherwise, the dinner cost will be $20.00 per person. The bar wrist band will be provided to you at the check-in desk on event day, if you purchased it.

Make your check payable to JACK BALKIR and send it to:

JACK BALKIR
3808 INWOOD LN
PHILADELPHIA, PA 19154

IMPORTANT:
YOUR PAYMENT MUST BE RECEIVED NO LATER THAN TUESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2012 WITHOUT ANY EXCEPTION. I AM OBLIGATED TO REVEAL THE FINAL GUEST NUMBER TO VICTOR'S PUB ON WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 17 IN ORDER GET AN ACCURATE SUPPORT AND SERVICE. I WILL CONFIRM YOUR PAYMENT (WITH OR WITHOUT WRIST BAND) VIA EMAIL UPON RECEIPT. IF YOU DO NOT UTILIZE EMAIL, PLEASE MAKE SURE TO PROVIDE YOUR CURRENT ADDRESS WITH YOUR PAYMENT. DO NOT SEND CASH PLEASE.

The dinner will be self serve style and menu includes the following:

*Cesar Salad
Hand tossed romaine lettuce with home made dressing and croutons.
*Baked Ziti
Ziti tossed in homemade red sauce with ricotta cheese baked and topped with fresh mozzarella.
*Deli Wraps
Assortment of deli meats and cheeses in tortilla wraps with lettuce, tomato and onion accompanied by an assortment of sandwich spreads.
*Chicken Fingers and French Fries
Lightly battered and fried chicken tenderloins accompanied by an assortment of dipping sauces
*Roast Beef Sandwiches
Slow roasted and shaved thin and served in au jus with the freshest possible rolls
accompanied by horseradish cream sauce.
*Coffee, tea, soft drinks included with dinner.

*THE ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES ARE NOT INCLUDED WITH THE DINNER PACKAGE, YOU MUST PURCHASE THEM SEPARATELY.

As always, it will be great to see you all at the reunion.

Take care,

Jack Balkir

Website: www.pnsyreunion.com

VISIT US IN Facebook (Search: PNSY REUNION)
 

Thursday, September 13, 2012

From: Frank Graf
E-Mail: pnsyfrank@verizon.net
Shop: 031 Shop/ Supply

I just seen Renee's posting that Jimmy Reed passed. So many Stores he was a good guy. Jim say hello to Billy May and Charlie Madson I'm sure the 3 of you are have a few drinks together. Dam I miss that place.

Frank

Sat, 8 Sep 2012


Rocky "Thomas" V. Ciprane, age 51, of Maysville, suddenly passed away on July 9, 2012.

Rocky was born in Pennsylvannia, moved to Delaware in 1972, and graduated from Claymont High School in 1979.

Rocky was employed at Sun Ship Building, Pa., Philadelphia Naval Shipyard and was currently employed with MCB Camp LeJeune as a boiler mechanic.

He was a positive person who impacted many lives and was a unique individual capable of taking an interest in whomever he met. He volunteered with the American Red Cross (Multi Gallon Club), Onslow County NCSSA Bike Run for Teens, and many other organizations. He was caring, loving, respected, loved, and would give you the shirt off his back (If he had one on).

He was preceded in death by his parents, Anthony V. and Henrietta M. Ciprane.

Rocky is survived by L. Anthony and Barbara J. Ciprane, Camille and Clyde Fawcett, goddaughter (niece) Sheri Fawcett, and nephew Adam Thomas Fawcett, daughters Terri and Tami and their mother Cindy, his grandchildren Damian, Zoey, Samantha, Sarah, and Mia Bella and his father-in-law, Lester McLaurin.

Rocky is also survived by his adopted sisters, Cathy, Trudy and Megan; and brothers, Rich, Seth, Jim, Timmy, Uwe, Bud, Doug, Moose, Steve, Bob, Fred, Hammy, and all the bikers he knew and loved as brothers and sisters.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Onslow County NCSSA Bike Run for Teens in Rocky's name.

A memorial service will be held at 2 p.m. Saturday, July 14 at Northwoods United Methodist Church.

Arrangements by Johnson Funeral Home of Jacksonville.

Rocky made his home in Maysville his Final Ride.



John F Walls Jr

Jurisdictional Inspector

FM Global

Monday, August 27, 2012

From: Phil V. Cufaro
E-Mail: Philip.Cufaro@dla.mil
Shop: Design.....Zone Tech Office

To Joe Del Grande's Family
I knew Joe for many years, a friend for a long time, not only from the shipyard...knew him when he sliced lunch meat for me at the Pike Cold Cuts in Delamr Village,Folcroft back in the late 60's. Before he had the P&E pogey bait candy store. Had that same smile back then and just as funny. Gonna miss you Joe. Rest in peace. God bless you and your family.

Monday, August 27, 2012

From: Ray
E-Mail: Haffelfinger
Shop: X56/C-360/263.3

I just returned from vacation and was deeply saddened by reading of the passing of Joe Del Grande. Joe and I worked for many years together on a daily basis for the "Ironman" Bobby Wright. And after working in Bldg. #4 I would stop down and see him and he'd tell me about the boys. My relationship with Joe and Anna Marie went beyond work, I had been to Joe's house for picnics and just hanging out on a Saturday night along with Bobby, myself and Jules Tamaccio and our wives, had many a pitcher of beers @ the Boathouse on Rt.252, times I have not forgotten. Joe was a class act,loved his family and always enjoyed working on his house. When Joe was in bldg. #1 I would stop by and talk after paying my Phillies tickets even after I left the yard just to catch up on things. Joe you were a "good buddy" I will miss you I hope you "rest in peace", now that your are with Anna Marie.

Friday, August 24, 2012

From: Bruce Conte
E-Mail: sphilly_20659@yahoo.com
Shop: 56/P&E

I had the pleasure of working with Joe Del Grande in P&E. A wonderful, funny and good hearted man. "Pogey bait" was one of kind. I was lucky to meet and know Joe. Truly a great guy. I want to express my condolences to his family and friends. Joe way be gone but never forgotten. Rest in peace my friend.

Wednesday, August 22, 2012

From: Larry S
E-Mail: schnepp@rcn.com
Shop: 56/P&E

Sad news about a fellow pipefitter and the "candy man" of Bldg 4;

Joseph F. Del Grande,64 Loving son, husband, father and brother Joseph F. Del Grande, 64, of Glen Mills, formerly of Norwood, passed away August 16, 2012 at his home. He was born May 1, 1948 the son of Gloria M. (nee Ciampi) Del Grande and the late Joseph Anthony Del Grande. Retired as an Engineer at the Philadelphia Naval Yard after 34 years of service; was a U.S. Army Veteran of the Vietnam War. He was an active parishioner at St. Thomas the Apostle Church where he was also very involved. Mr. DelGrande was an avid outdoorsman who enjoyed boating, fishing and he took pleasure in raising pheasants and oysters. He also loved spending time in Avalon with his family. Family: His wife, the late Anne Marie (nee Czyzewski / Casey) Del Grande; children Christopher and Michael; siblings Stephen and the late Anthony Del Grande; also survived by his nieces, nephews, cousins and friends Visitation/Service: Relatives and friends are invited to his visitation Thursday 9:15 AM until his Funeral Mass at 10:30 AM in St. Thomas the Apostle Catholic Church, Valleybrook Rd., Glen Mills. Burial St. Thomas the Apostle Catholic Cemetery, Glen Mills. Contributions to Taylor Hospice, 300 Johnson Ave., Ridley Park, PA 19078.

Tuesday, August 14, 2012

From: Renee (Denny) O'Hara
E-Mail: rohara@nmic.navy.mil
Shop: 31/39/SHIPSO

Hey Guys,

I didn't notice an obit from the family, so I thought I'd offer a mention for loss of x31 Jimmy Reed. I believe he passed in June or July. Jimmy was a long time 2nd shifter, he was a good man and a trusted friend. If I can get a copy of his obituary, I will post it for his family. RIP Jimmy.

Tuesday, August 14, 2012

From: Ron Miller
E-Mail: ronfish2002@yahoo.com
Shop: 31

I see that the USS Porter (DDG 78) collided with an oil tanker in the Strait of Hormuz. It is now in port at Jebel Ali, Dubai for repairs. Will PNSY be sending a tiger team? Who is taking avilability? What is the per diem these days? Sixteen hour workdays? So many questions.

Saturday, August 11, 2012

From: JACK BALKIR
E-Mail: JBALKIR@GMAIL.COM
Shop: 51/CODE 1200

PNSY REUNION is in Facebook now. Check it out and forward your comments.

In addition, I am working on the reunion event for this fall, stay tuned for more info.

Sunday, August 5, 2012

From: Danny O'Kane
E-Mail: dannyboydpo@rcn.com
Shop: 11 Shop

God Bless Our Troops !!! If you or any one in your family has a service member returning from deployment and you would like to give them a special WELCOME HOME you can contact us at this web site and we will escort them home in Rock Star Style !! Contact www.aheros-welcome.org or you can phone ,,484-679-1717 . Any questions you might have you can e-mail me . Danny O'Kane . Thank you ..

Sunday, August 5, 2012

From: Danny O'Kane
E-Mail: dannyboydpo@rcn.com
Shop: 11 Shop

" The Dink ",,,Tom Nannay,,,wonder how he's doing ??

Thursday, August 2, 2012

From: Wade Pollock
E-Mail: wadewado@aol.com
Shop: 11 Shop

Greetings Yardbirds, I was going through an old desk last week and found a "Dink Dollar". It would never buy much at the "Blind Man" but it brought a big smile to my face that day. I'm doing well and hope that everyone else is also.

Friday, July 13, 2012

From: Megan Tiberio (Daughter of Steve Tiberio)
E-Mail: megarose19@hotmail.com
Shop:

My dad, Steve Tiberio, worked at the Navy Yard and passed away this March from Mesothelioma. Please join us on Sunday, September 16, 2012 at 3pm for a 1-mile fun walk in memory of Steve Tiberio. The walk will start and end at Oakmont Fire Company in Havertown, PA. All donations will go to Penn Medicine Mesothelioma and Pleural Program. Please visit http://superstevestroll.weebly.com for more information. Please share his information with your family and friends and co-workers. Thank you for your continued support of Steve Tiberio and our efforts to cure Mesothelioma

Sun, 8 Jul 2012


From: Dcsckp@aol.com

Hello All

Two recent losses from the PNSY community were Steve Tiberio of Havertown Pa. and Tom Fee from Philly.

Steve was the pipefitter instuctor and moved on to the US Mint after the closing. He died sometime in the Spring of this year (2012). Tom was the Rigger Diver and Loft supervisor. He left us in July of this year. I don't have any other details at this time.

Thanks for the hard work keeping the spirit alive.

Dan Cashin
Rigger Instructor
 

Tue, 12 Jun 2012

 
From: Ted Wright <writhe82@gmail.com>
 

My grandfather, Jesse Mervyn Wright, worked at the Shipyards and I wanted to know where I could go to research when he worked there and what he worked on. Any information you might have would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks Much
Theodore D Wright
 

Tuesday, June 5, 2012

From: Danny O'Kane
E-Mail: dannyboydpo@rcn.com
Shop: 11 Shop

Summer is here but we never had a winter in the Philadelphia area and that's okay with this ex- yardbird. Would like to give a shout to all that if you are on the Chesapeake Bay this summer stop in at Great Oak Landing Marina on Fairlee Creek and look me up . My boat , ISLAND GIRL " is on the tee head of F - Dock right across from the fuel dock .
We've been here for 15 years after leaving Wildwood ,NJ. This place has it all : Mangroves restaurant , pool and hot tub , tennis courts , 6 hole pro golf course , Jelly - Fish - Joels Tiki Bar and a private beach . When not at the dock we have our trawler out on the bay and we monitor ch. 16 . So if you are ever on the Upper Bay and need to kick back , give me a call . Captain Dan on ISLAND GIRL .

June 5, 2012

My nme is Jim Lapp and I am a member of the USS Denver Asoociation as my father served on the USS Denver CL-58 during WWII. The Denver was built at the New York Shipbuilding facility in Camden NJ and was housed at the Philly Navy Yard after the war until she was scrapped in 1960. I just completed a 2 part pictorial history of the Denver which includes two oral history interviews and the video's have been uploaded to YouTube. I am sending you a copy of the e-mail that I sent to everyone who helped contribute to this project which includes the links to the videos. Not sure if this is something that you would like to link with you website on the Philly Navy yard but there are some photos of the Philly Navy yaard at the beginning of part 1.

Thanks

Jim Lapp




From: theduke_1776@verizon.net
Date: Jun 3, 2012 9:35:57 PM
Subject: Revised USS Denver CL-58 Tribute/Pictorial History
To: Undisclosed recipients: ;


Now hear this!! The revised "USS Denver CL-58 Pictorial History & Tribute has been uploaded to YouTube and is a 2 part video. The details and links to the videos are listed below.


Part 1 385 photos and video clips for a length of 58:55 minutes
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MhX00Wi3Nbs


Part 2 455 photos and video clips for a length of 1 hour 23 minutes
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nHfkmCU9y2Y


The new video has narrated letters to home from sailors; 350 new photos from the national archives; photos from the Navy Memorial and photos from more sailors and or their families. There are 2 interviews included as well, one from John Bloomer and one from a brother of a sailor who spent 3 days on the Denver visiting her while she was anchored in Manila Harbor. I have also added a personal tribute to the men killed on the Denver which is at the end of part 2. I was also able to find a song book called "Songs For Salty Bards" containing songs sung by the Denver men. I worked with the Rowan University men's chorus to perform 4 songs live and have them recorded to be used in this video, this would be the first time that these songs were played and heard in over 65 years. It took one year and three months to complete but it was worth every minute, at least for me who has such an interest in US history. I have connected with so many Denver sailors or their families from all parts of the United States. As you can see these videos are lengthy so schedule your viewing accordingly; make sure you have enough snacks and enjoy the videos. Thanks to everyone who assisted with compiling the photos and stories your efforts are greatly appreciated.


Sincerely,
Jim Lapp

Monday, June 4, 2012

From: Cliff Nash
E-Mail: pnsycliff@aol.com
Shop: 06

Social Security WEP & GPO offsets

Please join the fight to get the above offsets repealed.

http://www.ssfairness.com/contact-us/

A lot of yardbirds under CSRS will be affected by WEP and if worked under SS and paid 40 quarters of Social Security premiums, your monthly SS check will be reduced up to 50%. Your spouse will be affected by the GPO offset also.

Sunday, June 3, 2012

From: John Rola
E-Mail: jjr109@aol.com
Shop: 31

Just wanted to let former employees from 31 shop know that Al Strohmetz, from the hydraulic gang, is seriously ill with cancer. I recently spoke with Al and despite his illness he is in good spirits.

Wednesday, May 16, 2012

From: Mike Dougherty
E-Mail: mikrdougherty16@yahoo.com
Shop: 56 shop

I spent most of my career at the yard but I did work other places.A lot of us worked building the Salem Nuclear Plant in the 70's.Our skills were needed but what was lacking was a culture of fairness.The president of local 121 was also the superintendent and most of the bosses were local men.I was so happy to get back to the yard.No system is perfect but I found most of my bosses to be good,fair men.The women in personnel,like Linda Shay,made sure the rules were followed.Pete Mignogna demonstrated this culture of fairness.I never met Norbert Armstrong but I know badmouthing good people isn't fair

Thursday, April 26, 2012

From: Rob Ellzey
E-Mail: Rellzey@masongrahamcompany.com
Shop: 543, 12

I was only 16 when the PNSY closed but my dad was in the service for 44 years so I practically grew up in the yard. It was such a sight to see back then, even the Navy Hospital on Pattison is gone now, but all of the different things going on at the time was amazing. I just want to thank everyone for their service and hope one day industry like that comes back to the US.

Now days I'm part of the rebuilding of the yard and have been in many of the older buildings. Not sure of the building numbers but was a part of the Urban Outfitters projects. It was so sad to see the buildings converted into what they are now. I lost my dad in 2004 to liver failure related to the chemicals used back then but he had many stories about working there. Good luck to you all and I really enjoyed reading your stories.

Saturday, April 14, 2012

From: RICHARD BEGGS
E-Mail: RICH.BEGGS@VERIZON.NET
Shop: 64

LORI GERBER REPRESENTED ME AT THE DIFFICULT DISCOVERY PROCESS IN MY ABESTOS LIGATION. HER ADVICE, PROFESSIONALISM AND KNOWLEDGE OF ASBESTOS LIGATION ENABLED ME TO REACH A SATISFACTORY SETTLEMENT AT TRIAL. I WOULD ADVISE ANYONE CONSIDERING ABESTOS LIGATION TO CONTACT LORI.

Thursday, April 12, 2012

From: John Stangler
E-Mail: jcstangler@aol.com
Shop: 26

Bob was a Shipfitter Shop Planner, Very Nice Man

McMONIGLE
ROBERT J., age 78, April 10, 2012. Beloved husband of Wanda, for 51 years. Loving father of Theresa Kimble (Jim), Linda Costello (Robert), Mary McMonigle (Bob), and Sandra Shinn. Devoted Pop-Pop of Maureen, Stephanie, Robert, Grace, and Brett. Also survived by his sister-in-law, Maryann Carl. Robert was employed at the Phila. Naval Shipyard and as a Lieutenant in the Phila. Police Dept. Relatives and friends are invited to his Viewing Monday morning, 8 to 9:15 A.M., BURNS FUNERAL HOME, 9708 Frankford Ave. (S. of Grant Ave.). Funeral Mass, 10 A.M., St. Charles Borromeo Church. Interment Resurrection Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations in his memory to St. Francis Inn, 2441 Kensington Ave., Phila. PA 19125, or the charity of your choice would be appreciated.

Wednesday, April 11, 2012

From: Lori Garber
E-Mail: lgarber@lorigarberlaw.com
Shop:

It is very important to be tested for mesothelioma and lung cancer. The ramifications of asbestos remain a serious concern especially for shipyard workers. If you have any questions or need help finding a physician please call Lori Garber, Esquire at (856) 261-0442. I have been education people about asbestos for some time now and have a lot of good information that can prove invaluable. Thank you.

Friday, March 16, 2012

From: mike mcgeehan
E-Mail: mcmike5@yahoo.com
Shop: 56

Got word of another of our brothers has passed away. Don "Mac" Mc Neil. Don't know the particulars, but I believe he had been sick for awhile. He was a good guy, we had a lot of good times. mike mc

Wednesday, March 14, 2012

From: John D'Aprile
E-Mail: johndaprile@gmail.com
Shop: 31,093,c/232,227,284

RIP, MY SHIPYARD BROTHERS !

Wednesday, March 14, 2012

From: mike mcgeehan
E-Mail: mcmike5@yahoo.com
Shop: 56

Sorry to hear about Steve Tiberio. He was a good man. Worked with him at the Mint before the Yard. He told me he had Mesothelioma, which doesn't have a cure yet. He will be missed.
As I have stated here before, Get your chest x-rays each year,even if you have to pay for it yourself. Don't know much about the Meso. but Lung cancer, if you catch it early you can beat it. I've been one year clear,so far.
-----GET THEM CHEST X-RAYS !!!!!!! mike mc

Wednesday, March 14, 2012

From: Ray Haffelfinger
E-Mail: raym1207@aol.com
Shop: 56/c-360/design 263.3

With sadness that we add Steve Tiberio to list of yardbirds who have passed away. I knew Steve from the 'Yard but got to him so much more from working with him @ the U.S.Mint the last 12 years. Steve could "ruffle some feathers' when needed but he certainly knew what he was talking about he did his homework first, a pretty smart guy. Steve contracted Mesotheliomaa little over a year ago,and he fought it very hard to the end. Steve passed away this past Sunday morning March 11,with his devoted family surrounding him,Kathy,Katie,and Megan. Viewing is for Wednesday the 14th @ Stetch Funeral home in Havertown(Eagle Rd.) from 6-9 PM and again on Thursday from 9-10:30 and Mass @ St. Denis at 11 AM and burial also @ St. Denis.

Wednesday, March 14, 2012

From: Ken Bradley
E-Mail: kbradley128@yahoo.com
Shop: 11

Tom Sheedy, 26 Shop Welder Extraordinaire and US Army Vet has passed.
His funeral is on Friday, 9:00 AM at the Kociubinsky Family Funeral Home, 307 East Girard Ave, Phila, PA. That is in Fishtown.
Tom was a good guy.

Tuesday, March 13, 2012

From: jerry moresi
E-Mail: jerryblast@comcast.net
Shop: 57 & suppply

Very sorry to hear about the passing of Steve Tiberio of x56. Worked with him in the apprentice school and the one thing that I always took from him is that he was not an ass kisser like so many people at the navy yard were. A real stand up guy. Wish I knew more people like him at the yard.

Sunday, March 4, 2012

From: Dennis Kaiser
E-Mail: den69125@hotmail.com
Shop: 11, NFPC

Please add to the Obits

JOSEPH W. KRULIKOWSKI
(Joe ‘K’)

Died March 1, 2012.
He was the loving husband of Kathryn (nee Sweeney), the beloved father of Kathleen Tezla (Anthony), the grandfather of Elizabeth and Joseph, and the brother of Jane Charpentier. Joe K was the Head structural engineer at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard when it closed. He was assigned as the Director at the Naval Foundry and Propeller Center (Norfolk detachment) from where he retired. All services private at the family's request.

Monday, February 27, 2012

From: Lee Jones
E-Mail: ljones7@rcn.com
Shop: 41 Shop, NAVSHIPSO, DCMA


LEIGH R.Williams, 64, formerly of Glen Mills PA, passed away unexpectedly on Feb. 22, 2012.
Leigh was employed by the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard and Kvaerner Shipbuilding in Philadelphia. He served as a Marine medical corpsman in the Vietnam War. In 2004 Leigh and his wife Deborah moved to Vermont.
He is survived by his wife of 32 years Deborah (Thomas) Williams of Waterford VT, his mother Ellen Williams of Haddonfield NJ, his sister Lynne Moran and husband Michael of Haddon Township NJ; his parents-in-law William and Mildred Thomas of Brookhaven PA; brother-in-law Keith Thomas of Somers Point NJ, nieces, nephews and their families: Christopher Moran, Andrew Moran, Ryan Moran, and Adrienne Moran; Melissa Thomas and William Thomas V. He was predeceased by his father Dale Williams and brother-in-law William Thomas IV.
Services will be held in Littleton NH on Saturday, Feb. 25. Given his love of animals, contributions marked in his memory may be made to the Kingdom Animal Shelter, PO Box 462, St. Johnsbury VT 05819. Online condolences may be shared with the family pri-vately at www.saylesfh.com.

Monday, February 20, 2012

From: Tom Maiorano
E-Mail: pnsytom1@verizon.net
Shop: 38 shop

Hey Jesse Tucker,

Tom Maiorano here. We worked for Kevin many years ago. Ran into Harry Laquintano several times at the Aviation Supply Office in the Northeast between '96 and '97, my last year of government service before I got pensioned out. I do remember running into you at one of the early reunions. I believe Kevin was there too. Tried to email you but it came back undeliverable, maybe because it's a government address? Not sure. Get back to me when you can. Good to hear from anyone from 38 Shop. Lots of good memories.

Tuesday, February 14, 2012

From: Melissa M. Frankowski
E-Mail: mfrankowski@anapolschwartz.com
Shop: Shop 11

Good Afternoon,

Edward Merwitz recently died from Mesothelioma, leaving his wife and two children. Ed worked at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard from 1965 to 1970. He worked on the USS Shangri-La, the USS Saratoga, the USS Chilton and the USS New Orleans. We would like to speak with anyone who remembers working with Ed during those years. If you are willing to help, please call Melissa Frankowski at 215-735-1130 Extension 1249.

Thank you,

Melissa M. Frankowski

Monday, February 13, 2012

From: George Thompson
E-Mail: gsthompson3@verizon.net
Shop: 38

JOSEPH E. POWER Jr.


JOSEPH E. JR., 79, on February 10, 2012, of Runnemede. Born and raised in South Philadelphia. He was the beloved husband of the late Elizabeth (nee May). Devoted father of Kathleen (Paul) P. Krulish, Linda J. (Kevin) Gill, Barbara A. (Mark) Salerno, Mary E. (Gary) Kindle, Sister Elizabeth Grace(Laurie) and the late baby Joseph Power. Son of the late Joseph and Elizabeth(nee Hamilton) Power. Loving stepfather of Michael Gable, Diane Gable, Ellen (James) Hrkach and Frank (Karen) Gable. Loving grand-father of 17 and great grand-father of one. Dear brother of Joan (Alexander) Arrow and the late Francis Stairiker, Mary Sasso and Martin Power. Beloved uncle of many nieces and nephews. Joseph was a 1950 graduate of Southeast Catholic High School. He proudly served as a U.S. Marine Corps Corporal during the Korean War. For many years, Joseph worked for the Philadelphia Navy Yard as a foreman and marine machinist for Shop 38. After retiring, he later became superintendent of Hodson Commons in Cherry Hill. Joseph was a member of St. Maria Goretti RC Church. Family and friends are invited to call from 7 to 9P.M. Monday evening and 8:15 to 9:15A.M. Tuesday morning at GARDNER FUNERAL HOME, 126 S. BLACK HORSE PIKE, RUNNEMEDE, NJ. His Funeral Mass of Christian Burial will be held at Holy Child Parish, St. Maria Goretti RC Church, Runnemede, NJ, Tuesday at 10:00 A.M. Interment will follow at St. Joseph's Cemetery, Chews Landing, NJ. Expressions of sympathy may be made in Joseph's memory to the Marine Corps Scholarship Foundation, 121 S. St. Asaph St., Alexandria, VA. 22314.
Family and friends may share memories at www.GardnerFuneralHome.com

Monday, February 13, 2012

From: Jesse Tucker
E-Mail: Jesse.Tucker@dcma.mil
Shop: 38 Shop

Hey Yardbirds! I haven't been on this website in a long time and had forgotten what a great thing it is! I was only at the yard for five years (1981-1985), but they are some of the best years of my government career. I worked for Kevin Philpott and made a lot great freinds in a short time working together. I just wanted to say hi to all the guys that used work for Philpott. I would really like hear from anybody that I used to work with and I hope that everyone is doing well. Talk at you soon

Thursday, February 2, 2012

From: William Murphy
E-Mail: emtmurph@yahoo.com
Shop: 99 & 106.2/3

Just visited Bill Bartel, shop 99 & 106.3 in Our Lady of Ludes Hospital, Willingboro,NJ. He is not doing well. Please pray for him.
Heaven cal wait for this pipefitter. Murph

Wednesday, February 1, 2012

From: Dennis Kaiser
E-Mail: den69125@hotmail.com
Shop: 11

For the OBIT Section

WILLIAM H. "CRABMAN" JOHNSON III

WILLIAM H. III "CRABMAN", January 29, 2012, a veteran of the U.S. Army. Dearest of son Mildred House. Loving father of William H. IV , Jesse (Sarah) and Michelle Hesler. Dearest grandfather of Elijah and Natalie. Dear brother of Gaile Murphy and Charles E. Johnson. Loving companion of Ann Marie Kerr. Also survived by nieces and nephews. Relatives, friends, former employees of Phila. Naval Shipyard, employees of Aker Shipyard, members of St. John of the Jordan Club and members of VFW Mason-Dixon Post No. 7234 are invited to his Memorial Viewing Friday morning from 11 A.M. to 1 P.M. at SHEA FUNERAL HOME INC., 29th and Dickinson St., Phila., PA 19146. Int. private.

Published in Philadelphia Inquirer & Philadelphia Daily News on February 1, 2012

Monday, January 30, 2012

From: Lee Jones
E-Mail: ljones7@rcn.com
Shop: 41 Shop, NAVSHIPSO, DCMA

I received word last night that Bill "Crabman" Johnson, 72 Shop Rigger died of a heart attack yesterday (Sunday, January 29th). No details on funeral arraingments yet. I will post when they are available.

I grew up with Billy in Southwest Philly. He was a great guy, great rigger and he will be missed. God Rest His Soul.

Lee Jones

Thursday, January 26, 2012

From: Bob Daley
E-Mail: hogdale@hotmail.com
Shop: 51 Shop


Whatever became of Bill Adair Shop 51 foreman? Anyone know?

Thursday, January 12, 2012

From: Julio Casiano
E-Mail: Julio@Philly-Yardbird.com
Shop: 67964-026

I didn't know Paul Midiri very well, but I remember him being a top notch pipe welder in the pipe shop. I don't think many of his weld joints ever failed RT inspection.

Tuesday, January 10, 2012

From: John Stangler
E-Mail: jcstangler@aol.com
Shop: 26

PAUL ANTHONY MIDIRI SR.

MIDIRI
PAUL ANTHONY, SR., on January 8, 2012, of Runnemede. Age 88. Beloved husband of 61 years of Helen J. (nee Smith). Loving father of Diane Kochon (Christian), Paul, Jr. (Elizabeth) and Joseph (Ericka). Dear grandfather of the joys of his life Christian, Joey and Elaina. Brother of Rose D'Angelo and Marie Midiri. Brother-in-law of Joan Redgate. Also survived by nieces and nephews. Mr. Midiri proudly served in the US Navy in the South Pacific during WWII. He retired from the Philadelphia Naval Yard after 40 years as a welder, a job he loved. There will be a Viewing from 7 to 9 P.M., Wednesday eve, and 9:15 to 10:15 A.M., Thursday morning, GARDNER FUNERAL HOME RUNNEMEDE, 126 S. Black Horse Pike, Runnemede NJ. Funeral Mass, 11 A.M., Thursday, at Holy Child Parish, St. Teresa's RC Church, Runnemede. Interment private. Family requests, in lieu of flowers, donations be made in Mr. Midiri's memory to Trinity Lutheran Church Food Pantry, 200 E. Clements Bridge Rd., Runnemede NJ 08078.

Sunday, January 1, 2012

From: Ron "Garbage" Reeves
E-Mail: pnsy17shop@comcast.net
Shop: 17

A belated Merry Christmas, and a most prosperous New Year 2012 !!! Maybe we can clean house this year, and get rid of the rat in the big house.... Similar to Ed Grater... No one that ever worked at PNSY likes this guy, and if you did you're a fool, and not really one of the family !! I hate to talk politics, but I feel I must relate my sentiments. We that suffered for two years, without any raises to our pensions and SS hopefully we'll do our best to get rid of this pest once and for all. Meanwhile, we'll carry on with our lives best we can. I sure miss all of my family, and I was made homeless in 1996 when the 'yard closed, and I hope all that knew of me feel the same. I see some persons now and then, and we reminicse about the good times, and fellowship we had, and no one can take away our memories. I ran onto a woman the other day that had one of those Code 920 jackets that was handed out, and I asked if she worked at the 'yard she said no, but her father did, and I asked what shop & etc., but she was real rude, and told me to f... off. I told her we were a family and she started cursing so I left that go. Any other yardbird would be glad to take some time and reminisce... "yall take care now, and God Bless....

Saturday, December 31, 2011

From: Ron Miller
E-Mail: ronfish2002@yahoo.com
Shop: X31

Enjoy the holidays and best wishes for a Happy, Healthy New Year.

Friday, December 30, 2011

From: Ray Haffelfinger
E-Mail: Raym1207@aol.com
Shop: 56, C/360 & 263.3 Design

Happy New Year to all Yardbirds, worked there for 16 years and still miss the good times. Each Phillies game I can afford to go to with my daughters and going over the Platt bridge I look to the right at the 'yard and fondly remember the people I was fortunate to have known and worked with,knowing this week we would be on "Holiday Routine" To all take care and have a Happy and Healthy 2012


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